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King of Hearts review – boisterously Rabelaisian anti-war satire

Set during the first world war, Philippe de Broca’s drama imagines a French town booby-trapped by fleeing German forces

Three years before Richard Attenborough’s movie version of Oh! What a Lovely War there was this anti-war satire, set in 1918, now on rerelease – Philippe de Broca’s King of Hearts. Regarded by many, including its director, as a classic, it nonetheless flopped hard at the box office. Watching it again now, I find myself not quite able to hail it as a masterpiece, more of an engaging and contrived oddity – like a U-certificate Marat/Sade – exoticised by the spectacle of non-English-speaking actors dubbed in order to play Scottish soldiers.

Just before the end of the first world war, the German forces retreat from a French town but booby-trap it with a bomb timed to go off at midnight. The inhabitants flee in panic and the patients of a local
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Glenda Jackson: Tony Award for ‘Three Tall Women’ will make her 24th Triple Crown winner

Glenda Jackson: Tony Award for ‘Three Tall Women’ will make her 24th Triple Crown winner
Glenda Jackson is almost certain to win her first Tony Award on Sunday for her acclaimed performance in the first Broadway production of Edward Albee’s 1991 Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Three Tall Women.” She will become the 24th performer to win the Triple Crown of show business awards and cap off a comeback after an absence of almost a quarter of a century.

Jackson walked away from acting in 1992 to began a second career in politics, winning election to the British parliament. Yes, Ronald Reagan did the same thing but he had never reached the level of acclaim and success that Jackson had in Hollywood.

She is one of only 14 two-time Best Actress Oscar winners and she pulled off this double act in just four years. What makes that even more surprising is that she expressed a certain disdain for awards and didn’t attend any of the four Academy Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Blu-ray Review: Women In Love

Prolific director Ken Russell made his third feature film Women in Love in 1969 (the year it was released in the U.K.) with a terrific cast, starring the infamous Oliver Reed, as well as Alan Bates, Glenda Jackson, and Jennie Linden. The film was nominated for a number of prestigious awards, including several Oscars and BAFTAs; Jackson won the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1971. Based off of the novel by D.H. Lawrence, Women in Love is the story of gender and class battles in post-wwi industrialist Britain. The film follows a pair of independent women and sisters as they fall in love and navigate life's rocky emotions. Elementary school teacher and sister Ursula (Linden) falls in love with wealthy school...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Nicol Williamson: Troubled Genius

  • CinemaRetro
(Author Gabriel Hershman has written "Black Sheep: the Authorized Biography of Nicol Williamson" (The History Press). Williamson, who passed away in 2011 at age 75, was an enormous talent. John Osborne called him "The greatest actor since Brando". However, he had many personal demons that sidetracked what should have been a far more successful career. Hershman explores the peaks and valleys of this temperamental man's dramatic life and career and in this article reminds us of why his talents and work should be rediscovered.)

By Gabriel Hershman

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Peter O’Toole, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed, Alan Bates, Albert Finney, Tom Courtenay and … Nicol Williamson. Just a few of the most influential actors of their generation.

Were you surprised when I mentioned Nicol’s name? He was, at the time of his death, the least well known of that generation of actors. And yet, in my opinion,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Review: "Women In Love" (1969) Starring Oliver Reed, Alan Bates And Glenda Jackson; Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“Or Is It About Men?”

By Raymond Benson

Ken Russell’s controversial but widely-acclaimed adaptation of D. H. Lawrence’s novel, Women in Love, might have had a better and more appropriate title—Men in Love. While touted as being an examination of the nature of love and sexuality between two men and two women, in the end we are left with the more potent notion that there is a love that can exist between two males—as friends—that is more powerful and “eternal” than the love a man will have for a woman.

Released in 1969 in Britain and in 1970 in the U.S. (hence, its four Oscar nominations for the year 1970), Women in Love has not aged well in terms of its arty and borderline pretentious direction… but as I tell my Film History students, “judge a film within the context of when it was released.” In that regard,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Women in Love

Finally — a satisfying home video edition of Ken Russell’s absorbing, argument-starting classic, in which D. H. Lawrence’s quartet of bohemians attempt to live out their progressive theories about love and sex. The intellectual arguments may be cold but the characters are warm and vivid. Exceptional performing from all — Alan Bates, Glenda Jackson, Oliver Reed and Jennie Linden, and outstanding cinematography from Billy Williams.

Women in Love

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 916

1969 / Color / 1:75 widescreen / 131 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 27, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Sir Alan Bates, Oliver Reed, Glenda Jackson, Jennie Linden, Eleanor Bron, Alan Webb, Catherine Willmer, Vladek Sheybal.

Cinematography: Billy Williams

Film Editor: Michael Bradsell

Original Music: Georges Delerue

Written by Larry Kramer

Produced by Larry Kramer, Martin Rosen

Directed by Ken Russell

In college, this one was guaranteed to keep couples up all night, debating the merits of each character’s notion of what constitutes a good relationship.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Movie Poster of the Week: Sir Alan Bates in Posters

  • MUBI
Above: UK one sheet for The Shout (Jerzy Skolimowski, UK, 1978)One of the greatest but perhaps less heralded of British actors, Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003) is being deservedly feted over the next week at the Quad Cinema in New York with the retrospective series Alan Bates: The Affable Angry Young Man. The title makes sense: before he had acted on film Bates was in the original West End and Broadway productions of Look Back in Anger, but he played not the disaffected anti-hero Jimmy Porter, made famous on film by Richard Burton, but the amiable Welsh lodger Cliff. Though a performer of great virility, intelligence and passion, he often played second fiddle to his more demonstrative co-stars—whether Anthony Quinn in Zorba the Greek (1964), Lynn Redgrave in Georgy Girl (1966), Julie Christie in Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) and The Go-Between (1971), or Jill Clayburgh in An Unmarried Woman (1978). Consequently, he is
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Raúl Ruiz, ‘The Heartbreak Kid,’ Alex Ross Perry, ‘Catwoman’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

A retrospective of the great, perpetually underseen Raúl Ruiz winds down its second part.

Anthology Film Archives

Films by Elaine May, Albert Brooks, Pialat, and Zulowski play in “Valentine’s Day Massacre.”

Erich von Stroheim’s Greed will play on Saturday and Sunday.

Metrograph

Retrospectives Alex Ross Perry and St.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The L-Shaped Room

The L-Shaped Room

Blu ray

Twilight Time

1962 / 1:85 / 126 Min. / Street Date December 19, 2017

Starring Leslie Caron, Tom Bell, Brock Peters

Cinematography by Douglas Slocombe

Written by Bryan Forbes

Music by Brahms, John Barry

Edited by Anthony Harvey

Produced by Richard Attenborough

Directed by Bryan Forbes

The winter of 1962 found British films at their most grandiose and self-effacing. Opening at the Odeon was Lawrence of Arabia, using every inch of that cavernous theater’s wide screen. Five minutes up the road Dr. No had just premiered in the smaller but no less lofty London Pavilion.

On the other side of the tracks art houses were bringing starry-eyed Brits back to earth with austere fare like John Schlesinger’s A Kind of Loving and Tony Richardson’s The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner.

Those sober-minded dramas, shot in low key black and white with ramshackle flats and grey skies as their backdrops,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018
Martin Scorsese is no stranger to The Criterion Collection, but that doesn’t make the announcement that his period drama “The Age of Innocence” will be officially joining the club in March 2018 any less exciting. Scorsese’s 1993 adaptation of Edith Wharton’s seminal novel will join other Scorsese films like “The Last Temptation of Christ” in the Collection.

Read More:‘Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ and More Join Criterion Collection in February 2018

“Innocence” is one of six new movies coming to Criterion in March 2018. Other new additions include Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent masterpiece “The Passion of Joan of Arc” and Volker Schlöndorff’s largely-unseen “Baal.” You can head over to The Criterion Collection website to pre-order the titles now. Check out all the new additions below. Synopses provided by Criterion.

Elevator to the Gallows

For his feature debut, twenty-four-year-old Louis Malle brought together a mesmerizing performance by Jeanne Moreau,
See full article at Indiewire »

Ken Russell’s Women In Love Coming To The Criterion Collection? New Restoration Hitting NYC’s Metrograph This Weekend

There are few things that bring joy to this young writer’s eyes than the monthly “wacky drawing” found in the Criterion Collection newsletter. Be it the small pieces hinting at a single pending release, or the one found in each New Year’s letter that leaves nerds searching for answers for the subsequent 12 months, these are exciting little puzzles that leave social media a buzz. And that’s ostensibly what happened once again, this time with some interesting twists.

Earlier this week Criterion sent out their newsletter with a drawing of two women playing a game of tennis, with the score tied at love-love. Now, some have seen this as a hint towards a pending release of the great Milos Forman picture Loves of a Blonde, but the more enticing possibility and the one that seems to be a better fit, Ken Russell’s Women In Love has a particular wrinkle worthy of note.
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘Women in Love’: Ken Russell’s Relentlessly Electrifying, Unorthodox D.H. Lawrence Adaptation

Ken Russell’s reputation as a stoker of controversy and flamboyant provocateur in extremis largely precedes his voluminous body of work. His best-known film, The Devils – condemned by the Catholic Church and edited significantly by the film’s producers before finally being released by Warner Bros. in 1971 – continues to uphold a sorcerer-like allure due, in part, to still-relative absence on home-video platforms and repertory circuits. It seems that, in some ways, Russell’s notoriety stems from how much censorship succeeded – an infamy bolstered by the continued inaccessibility of his most notorious efforts, even in the on-demand era, despite the loosening of moral standards since his films first passed through ratings boards. It’s hard to believe that, as far as content is concerned, a modern audience would still find his depictions of sexuality and religion so morally beyond the pale. But from a stylistic perspective, much of Russell’s formal
See full article at The Film Stage »

Walter Lassally obituary

Cinematographer who won an Oscar for the 1964 film classic Zorba the Greek

The title of the cinematographer Walter Lassally’s 1987 autobiography, Itinerant Cameraman, could not have been more apt. Lassally, who has died aged 90, was born in Germany (he had a German father and a Polish mother), lived and worked in the UK, and made films in, among many other countries, Czechoslovakia and Greece.

It was the last of these, where he shot Zorba the Greek (1964), which won him best black-and-white cinematography Oscar, that meant the most to him. Known locally as “Walter the Greek”, Lassally lived for many years outside the city of Chania, on the island of Crete, near the beach that had served as location for the movie’s celebrated final scene, with Anthony Quinn and Alan Bates dancing to the music of Mikis Theodorakis. He shot six films with its Greek director Michael Cacoyannis, but he
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ribbons of memory by Anne-Katrin Titze

Doug Nichol's California Typewriter brilliantly captures the percussion of the keys at Lincoln Plaza Cinemas Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Antiquarian typewriter collector Martin Howard over brunch in the garden of Narcissa, next door to the Standard Hotel, joined me for a conversation on California Typewriter, Doug Nichol's documentary featuring Tom Hanks, John Mayer, Jeremy Mayer, Pulitzer Prize winners David McCullough and Sam Shepard, and a reenactment of Ed Ruscha and Mason Williams' Royal Road Test execution. Martin is the glue of the film as we are taken on an historical journey for his search to purchase a Sholes & Glidden typewriter.

Martin Howard on typewriter Betty Grable: "She uses a Sholes & Glidden in The Shocking Miss Pilgrim." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Wrong Box (John Mills, Michael Caine, Ralph Richardson, Peter Sellers, Peter Cook, Dudley Moore), Royal Flash (Malcolm McDowell, Alan Bates, Florinda Bolkan, Oliver Reed), Waterloo (Rod Steiger,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

John Heyman, Distinguished Financier and Producer, Dies at 84

Film producer and financier John Heyman, who founded influential British agency International Artists and the World Group Companies, died Friday in New York, his family told Variety via statement. He was 84.

John Heyman passed away in his sleep today, Friday the 9th of June,” the statement read.

His son, David Heyman, is the producer of the Harry Potter films, among many others.

Heyman’s World Film Sales pioneered the foreign pre-sales of films on a territory by territory basis.

John Heyman produced films including “The Go-Between” (1971), family sci-fi film “D.A.R.Y.L.” (1985) and “The Jesus Film” (1979). He was also an uncredited executive producer on David Lean’s 1984 E.M. Forster adaptation “A Passage to India.”

Over the course of his career he arranged financing of more than $3 billion to co-finance films including “Awakenings” and “The Odessa File” (at Columbia), “Edward Scissorhands,” “Home Alone” and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” (Fox), “Victor/Victoria” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Heyman, Producer, Agent and Film Financier, Dies at 84

John Heyman, a producer, agent, film financier and father of Harry Potter producer David Heyman, has died. He was 84.

Heyman died Friday in New York City, his daughter, Dahlia Heyman, who also is a producer, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Heyman was the founder of the London-based International Artists Agency, with clients that included Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Michael Caine, Richard Harris, Shirley Bassey and Burt Bacharach, and among the films he produced was the Burton-Taylor starrer Boom! (1968).

He also produced Joseph Losey's The Go-Between (1971) — which starred Julie Christie and Alan Bates and won the Palme d'Or...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

John Heyman, Producer, Agent and Film Financier, Dies at 84

John Heyman, a producer, agent, film financier and father of Harry Potter producer David Heyman, has died. He was 84.

Heyman died Friday in New York City, his daughter, Dahlia Heyman, who also is a producer, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Heyman was the founder of the London-based International Artists Agency, with clients that included Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Michael Caine, Richard Harris, Shirley Bassey and Burt Bacharach, and among the films he produced was the Burton-Taylor starrer Boom! (1968).

He also produced Joseph Losey's The Go-Between (1971) — which starred Julie Christie and Alan Bates and won the Palme d'Or...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

"The Ruling Class" Screening, L.A., April 25

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

The Royal Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 45th anniversary DVD screening of Peter Medak’s 1972 film The Ruling Class. The 154-minute film, which stars Alastair Sim, Arthur Lowe, Caroline Seymour, Coral Browne, Harry Andrews, and Peter O'Toole, will be screened on DVD on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

Please Note: At press time, director Peter Medak is scheduled to appear in person for a discussion about the film following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

The Ruling Class (1972)

45th Anniversary Screening

Tuesday, April 25, at 7 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Followed by Q & A with Director Peter Medak

Presented on DVD

This biting black comedy, in the tradition of such British classics as Kind Hearts and Coronets, focuses on a fierce battle for succession within an aristocratic family. Peter O’Toole plays a
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Smurfs & Gramps Take One Last Swing At Box Office -- The Weekend Warrior

Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, as well as other cool events and things to check out.

Three New Movies May Have Trouble Making Much of a Mark

After a couple impressive March weekends with one new box office record, and a couple impressive openings, we’re now into April, and of the new movies, there just doesn’t seem like anything can defeat last week’s powerful duo of DreamWorks Animation’s The Boss Baby--which exceeded all predictions with $49 million, taking the top spot from Beauty and the Beast. Ghost in the Shell didn’t even do as well as I thought it may, opening with just $19 million, those late reviews helping to kill its weekend.

Sony Pictures Animation are giving the loveable blue Smurfs a third go at American audiences with The Smurfs: The Lost Village (Sony), after two previous movies,
See full article at LRM Online »

‘Mulholland Drive’ Restoration Trailer: David Lynch’s 2001 Masterpiece Gets a Brand New Look — Watch

‘Mulholland Drive’ Restoration Trailer: David Lynch’s 2001 Masterpiece Gets a Brand New Look — Watch
StudioCanal UK has released the brand new (and shiny) trailer for the restoration of David Lynch’s “Mulholland Drive.” Last August, the BBC conducted a poll of more than 177 film critics around the world to determine which were the best films of the 21st century, and Lynch’s iconic 2001 film topped the list. Now, 16 years after its premiere, the mystery/thriller has gotten a 4K restoration under the supervision of Lynch himself, and it’s ready to hit UK theaters.

Read More: David Lynch Revisited: Why We Need His Genius Now More Than Ever — Critics Debate

The surrealistic film follows a woman (Laura Harring) who becomes amnesic after a car accident on Los Angeles’ Mulholland Drive and an aspiring actress (Naomi Watts). The two embark on a search for clues throughout the city, where dreams and reality intertwine.

Read More: David Lynch and Kyle MacLachlan Start the ‘Twin Peaks’ Reunion
See full article at Indiewire »
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