An honest New York cop named Frank Serpico blows the whistle on rampant corruption in the force only to have his comrades turn against him.

Director:

Sidney Lumet

Writers:

Peter Maas (book), Waldo Salt (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
1,543 ( 533)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Al Pacino ... Serpico
John Randolph ... Sidney Green
Jack Kehoe ... Tom Keough
Biff McGuire ... Captain McClain
Barbara Eda-Young ... Laurie (as Barbara eda-Young)
Cornelia Sharpe ... Leslie
Tony Roberts ... Bob Blair
John Medici John Medici ... Pasquale
Allan Rich ... D.A. Tauber
Norman Ornellas Norman Ornellas ... Rubello
Edward Grover ... Lombardo (as Ed Grover)
Albert Henderson Albert Henderson ... Peluce (as Al Henderson)
Hank Garrett ... Malone
Damien Leake ... Joey
Joseph Bova Joseph Bova ... Potts (as Joe Bova)
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Storyline

Serpico is a cop in the 1960s-early 1970s. Unlike all his colleagues, he refuses a share of the money that the cops routinely extort from local criminals. Nobody wants to work with Serpico, and he's in constant danger of being placed in life threatening positions by his "partners". Nothing seems to get done even when he goes to the highest of authorities. Despite the dangers he finds himself in, he still refuses to 'go with the flow', in the hope that one day, the truth will be known. Written by Rob Hartill

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Many of his fellow officers considered him the most dangerous man alive - An honest cop.


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John G. Avildsen was originally to direct, but was replaced just before filming due to differences with the producer. See more »

Goofs

As the cops watch the drug dealer's apartment near the end of the movie, a Renault Dauphine is parked in the front of the building. It disappears after Frank enters the building. Once the police bust the two users leaving the building, the gray car parked across the sidewalk on the other side of the street disappears as well. See more »

Quotes

Frank Serpico: You know that I'm totally isolated in the department. I don't have a friend.
Chief Sidney Green: Oh, don't give me that bullshit about friends. I've been putting cops away for thirty years. My name's an obscenity to every shithouse wall in every precinct in the city.
Frank Serpico: I've observed that, sir.
Chief Sidney Green: Friends! And I fought my way up as a Jew in the department in the days you were supposed to have an uncircumcised shamrock between your legs. I have this nightmare. I'm on 5th Avenue watching the St. Patrick's Day parade and I ...
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Alternate Versions

There is one Australian VHS version released through RCA Columbia Pictures Hoyts Home Video in the 1980s which had all profanity overdubbed with tamer language, as well as some scenes of sexuality/nudity. Subsequent releases on DVD are uncensored. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Coonskin (1974) See more »

Soundtracks

Aria di Rinuccio
(uncredited)
from "Gianni Schicchi"
Music by Giacomo Puccini
Performed by Al Pacino
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User Reviews

Serpico
24 March 1999 | by Coxer99See all my reviews

A perfect, true to life film based on the true exploits of a young police officer named Frank Serpico. Serpico was an officer in a time when political corruption was rampant and many of his brethren were found "on the take." The true story is brought to the screen under the superb leadership and direction of Sidney Lumet and the brilliant performance of Al Pacino as Serpico. Serpico was said to be known for his eccentricity and Pacino plays it up every step of the way, from the hairy beard to the earrings; he immerses himself into the character. This is the first of two great pairings with Lumet and Pacino. They know character. You see it here and you see it in 'Dog Day Afternoon." They know the streets. Lumet is a avid filmmaker of "New York-style films." Pacino walks the beat in his hobo outfits and long hair as if he's a hippie, not a cop. Although an eccentric, Serpico cannot be bought and certainly cannot be had, by anyone... cop or crook Pacino was Oscar nominated, but lost to Jack Lemmon for his performance in "Save the Tiger." The film was also nominated for it's taut screenplay, based on the Peter Maas book of the same title.


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Details

Country:

Italy | USA

Language:

English | Italian | Spanish

Release Date:

5 December 1973 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Serpico See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$29,800,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$29,829,963
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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