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Marat/Sade (1967)

Not Rated | | Drama, History, Music | 13 April 1967 (Sweden)
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1:55 | Trailer

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In an insane asylum, Marquis de Sade directs Jean Paul Marat's last days through a theater play. The actors are the patients.

Director:

Peter Brook

Writers:

Peter Weiss (play), Geoffrey Skelton (English translation by) | 2 more credits »
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2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Patrick Magee ... Marquis de Sade
Ian Richardson ... Jean-Paul Marat
Michael Williams ... Herald
Clifford Rose ... Monsieur Coulmier
Glenda Jackson ... Charlotte Corday
Freddie Jones ... Cucurucu
Hugh Sullivan Hugh Sullivan ... Kokol
John Hussey ... Newly Rich Lady
William Morgan Sheppard ... A Mad Animal
Jonathan Burn ... Polpoch
Jeanette Landis Jeanette Landis ... Rossignol
Robert Langdon Lloyd Robert Langdon Lloyd ... Jacques Roux (as Robert Lloyd)
John Steiner ... Monsieur Dupere
James Mellor James Mellor ... Schoolmaster
Henry Woolf ... Father
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Storyline

July 13, 1808 at the Charenton Insane Asylum just outside Paris. The inmates of the asylum are mounting their latest theatrical production, written and produced by who is probably the most famous inmate of the facility, the Marquis de Sade. The asylum's director, M. Coulmier, a supporter of the current French regime led by Napoleon, encourages this artistic expression as therapy for the inmates, while providing the audience - the aristocracy - a sense that they are being progressive in inmate treatments. Coulmier as the master of ceremonies, his wife and daughter in special places of honor, and the cast, all of whom are performing the play in the asylum's bath house, are separated from the audience by prison bars. The play is a retelling of a period in the French Revolution culminating with the assassination exactly fifteen years earlier of revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat by peasant girl, Charlotte Corday. The play is to answer whether Marat was a friend or foe to the people of France. ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | History | Music

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 April 1967 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

A Perseguição e o Assassinato de Jean-Paul Marat Desempenhados Pelos Loucos do Asilo de Charenton Sob a Direção do Marquês de Sade See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Several lines in de Sade's play give the impression that Charlotte Corday was a royalist (as she was portrayed, for instance, in the British press at the time of her trial). In fact she belonged to a revolutionary sect, the Girondins, more moderate than Marat's. See more »

Quotes

Herald: Crucifiction, all good Christians know, is the most sympathetic way to go.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening credits - the play's title, stage credits and the actors appearing in the film - pop on the screen, one word at a time, until it is filled. The closing credits - the film's production staff - start off with a full screen of words; they then pop off the screen, one word at a time, until it is completely empty...just as it was when the film began. See more »

Alternate Versions

The first VHS video release of the film, through Water Bearer Films, includes an expositional opening monologue over the opening titles on black. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Asylum: Episode #1.4 (1996) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Amazing Acting/Spectacular Film
11 June 2004 | by middleburgSee all my reviews

When Marat/Sade was first shown--those of us used to the traditional Hollywood film entertainments were just stunned. What a tour de force of acting, story, makeup, style, filming and music. We didn't know what to make of it. On the one hand it was the scariest, most disturbing film we had seen, on the other

hand it was a grand entertainment with absolutely intriguing characters. Was it historically accurate? Is it a dream? Was that really supposed to be the

Marquis de Sade up on the screen? The film has amazing bookends: The

opening film credits appearing in complete silence one word at a time and then disappearing one word at a time, has to be sort of a classic of film titles-- anticipating the minimalist art movements in the visual arts. Before the film even begins, we are off kilter, completely disoriented. The horrifying ending at the time was a shocker. One is really unprepared for this spectacular brutality--and the fact that it just ends in the midst of the chaos with zero resolution again is totally disorienting. This remains a great film--with some of the most amazing acting ever caught on screen. For most of us here in the U.S., it was the first time we saw Glenda Jackson. Her voice, her presence, her amazing acting

technique--she became instantaneously recognized as one of the great screen

actresses. And sure enough shortly thereafter, she won her two academy

awards. If you enjoy great theatre, and great film treatments of theatrical

material--this film is simply not to be missed.


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