In an insane asylum, Marquis de Sade directs Jean Paul Marat's last days through a theater play. The actors are the patients.

Director:

Peter Brook

Writers:

Peter Weiss (play), Geoffrey Skelton (English translation by) | 2 more credits »
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4 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Patrick Magee ... Marquis de Sade
Ian Richardson ... Jean-Paul Marat
Michael Williams ... Herald
Clifford Rose ... Monsieur Coulmier
Glenda Jackson ... Charlotte Corday
Freddie Jones ... Cucurucu
Hugh Sullivan Hugh Sullivan ... Kokol
John Hussey ... Newly Rich Lady
William Morgan Sheppard ... A Mad Animal
Jonathan Burn ... Polpoch
Jeanette Landis Jeanette Landis ... Rossignol
Robert Langdon Lloyd Robert Langdon Lloyd ... Jacques Roux (as Robert Lloyd)
John Steiner ... Monsieur Dupere
James Mellor James Mellor ... Schoolmaster
Henry Woolf ... Father
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Storyline

July 13, 1808 at the Charenton Insane Asylum just outside Paris. The inmates of the asylum are mounting their latest theatrical production, written and produced by who is probably the most famous inmate of the facility, the Marquis de Sade. The asylum's director, M. Coulmier, a supporter of the current French regime led by Napoleon, encourages this artistic expression as therapy for the inmates, while providing the audience - the aristocracy - a sense that they are being progressive in inmate treatments. Coulmier as the master of ceremonies, his wife and daughter in special places of honor, and the cast, all of whom are performing the play in the asylum's bath house, are separated from the audience by prison bars. The play is a retelling of a period in the French Revolution culminating with the assassination exactly fifteen years earlier of revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat by peasant girl, Charlotte Corday. The play is to answer whether Marat was a friend or foe to the people of France. ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | History | Music

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The October 30, 2005 edition of the comic strip "Frank and Ernest" started with Frank saying that the printing press was down and they would have to do all the posters for the Bijoux's double bill by hand. Frank, of course, assigned himself the poster for M (1931), and assigned Ernest the poster for "Marat/Sade," with the full title written out. See more »

Quotes

Herald: The revolution came and went, And unrest was replaced by discontent.
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits - the play's title, stage credits and the actors appearing in the film - pop on the screen, one word at a time, until it is filled. The closing credits - the film's production staff - start off with a full screen of words, and they then pop off the screen, one word at a time, until it is completely empty...just as it was when the film began. See more »

Alternate Versions

The first VHS video release of the film, through Water Bearer Films, includes an expositional opening monologue over the opening titles on black. See more »

Connections

Featured in Changing Stages (2000) See more »

User Reviews

 
Strange History
30 June 2017 | by gavin6942See all my reviews

In an insane asylum, the Marquis de Sade directs Jean Paul Marat's last days through a theater play. The actors are the patients.

Did something like this actually happen? I could imagine the Maquis de Sade putting this sort of thing together, because what else is he going to do with his time? But did they actually allow this? And, of course, the real inmates could not possibly have been such good actors and singers... could they? As others have noted, this film can be enjoyed by anyone but probably has much more significance for those who grasp the politics and philosophy of the French Revolution. To try to fully comprehend the class distinctions and other angles without some background would be a challenge. To say I fully grasped the competing views of the inmates, Sade and the warden would be a lie.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 April 1967 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Marat/Sade See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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