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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995

13 items from 2016


Gallery: Best silver screen kisses

11 February 2016 4:42 PM, PST | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

William Holden (1918 - 1981) belatedly discovers the charms of chauffeur's daughter Audrey Hepburn (1929 - 1993) in 'Sabrina', directed by Billy Wilder.

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January 01, 1954| Credit: John Kobal Foundation

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Dustin Hoffman kisses Ann Bancroft in a scene from the film 'The Graduate', 1967.

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January 01, 1967| Credit: Archive Photos

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Burt Lancaster (1913 - 1994) and Deborah Kerr(1921 - 2007) in a scene from 'From Here to Eternity', Halona Cove, Oahu, Hawaii, 1953. The film was directed by Fred Zinnemann, for Columbia Pictures.

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January 01, 1953| Credit: Columbia Pictures, Getty Images

Cary Grant (1904 - 1986) and Ingrid Bergman kiss in 'Notorious'. Title: Notorious Studio: Rko Director: Alfred Hitchcock

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January 01, 1946| Credit: Hulton Archive

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Sean Connery and Japanese actress Mie Hama locked in a passionate embrace on a boat during the filming of 'You Only Live Twice', on location in the village of Akime, in South Japan.

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August 01, 1966| Credit: Keystone Features, Getty Images

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Grace Kelly (1929.1982) and Cary Grant (1904.1986) kissing in »

- Inside Film Correspondent

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Film Review: ‘Deadpool’

6 February 2016 9:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

At this point, a movie studio would have to torch its headquarters, donate its merchandising revenues to charity, and produce a seven-hour art film performed in Ukrainian sign language to do something that truly qualified as a subversive gesture. Until then, viewers should gladly submit to the gleefully self-skewering pleasures of “Deadpool,” a scabrously funny big-screen showcase for the snarkiest of Marvel’s comic-book creations — a disfigured and disreputable mercenary who likes to crack wise, bust heads and generally lay waste to the idea that he’s anyone’s hero. As a vehicle for the impudent comic stylings of Ryan Reynolds, this cheerfully demented origin story is many, many cuts above “Green Lantern,” and as a sly demolition job on the superhero movie, it sure as hell beats “Kick-Ass.” And given the resurgence of fanboy interest following a well-received trailer at last year’s Comic-Con (plus the benefit of Imax »

- Justin Chang

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Whit Stillman Talks Jane Austen, Kate Beckinsale, Realism in Movies, and ‘Love & Friendship’

1 February 2016 9:32 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Ever since his indie breakout Metropolitan in 1990, Whit Stillman has built a specific kind of comedy within class structure. From the strait-laced businessmen struggling to break free of themselves in Barcelona to the ambitious, two-faced college girls in Damsels in Distress, Stillman finds the laughter in the deviousness of human nature.

Love & Friendship, his fifth film, premiered at Sundance and is set to be released by Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions this spring. Adapted from Jane Austen‘s little-read, barely-published novella ‘Lady Susan,’ the costume-drama setting and biting social commentary allows for some of the funniest moments in Stillman’s career. It’s as though Austen was writing for a filmmaker like Stillman to adapt her. It’s a true match made in heaven.

Check out conversation with the director from Sundance 2016 below.

The Film Stage: Was this adaptation something that you had in your back pocket for some time? »

- Dan Mecca

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Remembering Oscar-Winning Gwtw Art Director Menzies

28 January 2016 3:24 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

William Cameron Menzies. William Cameron Menzies movies on TCM: Murderous Joan Fontaine, deadly Nazi Communists Best known as an art director/production designer, William Cameron Menzies was a jack-of-all-trades. It seems like the only things Menzies didn't do was act and tap dance in front of the camera. He designed and/or wrote, directed, produced, etc., dozens of films – titles ranged from The Thief of Bagdad to Invaders from Mars – from the late 1910s all the way to the mid-1950s. Among Menzies' most notable efforts as an art director/production designer are: Ernst Lubitsch's first Hollywood movie, the Mary Pickford star vehicle Rosita (1923). Herbert Brenon's British-set father-son drama Sorrell and Son (1927). David O. Selznick's mammoth production of Gone with the Wind, which earned Menzies an Honorary Oscar. The Sam Wood movies Our Town (1940), Kings Row (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943). H.C. Potter's Mr. Lucky »

- Andre Soares

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Whit Stillman and Oscar Snub 'Phoenix' Coming to Criterion Collection This April

18 January 2016 7:50 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: John Frankenheimer and Vittorio De Sica are Coming to Criterion Collection This March Christian Petzold's "Phoenix" earned some of last year's highest critical accolades when it opened over the summer, and it appears the Criterion Collection took notice, as it is bringing the German psycho-drama to its library this April.  Petzold's film will be joining classics from Whit Stillman, Howard Hawkes, Richard Drew and more.  Check out all of the titles hitting Criterion this April below, with synopses and special addition information provided by the collection. "Only Angles Have Wings" Electrified by the verbal wit and visual craftsmanship of the great Howard Hawks, "Only Angels Have Wings" stars Jean Arthur as a traveling entertainer who gets more than she bargained for during a stopover in a South American port town. There she meets a handsome yet aloof daredevil pilot, played by Cary Grant, who runs an airmail. »

- Zack Sharf

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The Woman Who Knew Too Little in Alfred Hitchock’s Suspicion

15 January 2016 9:57 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Released 75 years ago, Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspicion (1941), his fourth film to be made in the United States, was a departure from his previous films. Unlike The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935), or The Lady Vanishes (1938), Suspicion eschews the globetrotting and spying that made those films so exhilarating. It’s an intimate affair, a chamber drama (or chamber suspense film) primarily led by Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine, only occasionally breached by other supporting actors. Hitchcock had rarely worked on such a minimal scale before; even in Rebecca (1940); the mansion Manderlay was practically its own character. The isolation of Grant and Fontaine’s marriage is suffocating and without precedent in Hitchcock’s filmography. Though flawed due to Production Code restrictions, Suspicion remains one of Hitchcock’s most fascinating experiments.

Joan Fontaine plays Lina McLaidlaw, a woman presumably more interested in books than men (a woman wearing glasses in a »

- Brian Marks

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This week’s new film events

15 January 2016 5:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Slapstick | Horror-On-Sea

The mechanics and dynamics of silent comedy didn’t die with the advent of the talkies – just look at last year’s Shaun The Sheep Movie. A breadth of remit allows this silent and classic comedy film festival to stray beyond the confines of early cinema, although it always manages to find more of that out there. New (re)discoveries this year include Mancunian comedies (from the studio once known as “Jollywood”), silent westerns and a Soviet menage a trois. In addition you get sound-assisted slapstick such as Cary Grant’s breakthrough The Awful Truth (introduced by comedian Lucy Porter), and guests including Stephen Merchant, Ken Dodd, Tim Vine (on Sgt Bilko), and Marcus Brigstocke in conversation with the makers of Shaun The Sheep. And if all else fails, you can’t go wrong with an orchestrally accompanied screening of Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid.

Continue reading »

- Steve Rose

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A Star is Born

12 January 2016 10:00 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Cary Grant was originally entreated by co-star Judy Garland to play fading star Norman Maine in this remake of the 1937 original, but when he stepped out James Mason took over to provide one of his most iconic performances. Director George Cukor (who had filmed the first version of the story, What Price Hollywood?) was outraged when the studio dropped 47 minutes from the general release version. He refused to watch the film again until until the painstakingly restored 1983 release, but died before he could see it. »

- TFH Team

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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1

9 January 2016 4:55 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Well, we’ve finally reached the summit: the 10 most definitive romantic comedies of all time. Unlike the other sections of this list, there is not a movie here that approaches “bad.” As always, some are better than others, despite the order. But one thing is for sure: if you plan to have a rom-com binge-a-thon soon, this is where you start, no questions asked. In fact, after reading this, you should go do that and report back.

courtesy of reverseshot.com 10. Some Like It Hot (1959)

What’s funnier than men dressing in drag? Depends on who you ask. It’s Billy Wilder again with a fictional story of two musicians – Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) – who witness the St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Chicago and leave town. But, since the mob has ties everywhere, they need to disguise themselves as best they can: as women in an »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 20-11

9 January 2016 4:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

So, we’ve arrived at the top 20, slowly creeping toward those films that are exactly what a romantic comedy should be. We’ve seen films that fall into the category, but lean more toward other genres. We’ve seen romantic films that are funny enough to be comedies, but don’t entirely represent the spirit of the rom-com, despite being brilliant films. Now, we form a clearer picture of what a romantic comedy is. Not all of the films in this section are necessarily “good,” but they’re all iconic, definitive romantic comedies (hence their inclusion). Memorability does not necessarily come partnered with quality. It means right place, right time.

courtesy of totalfilm.com 20. Sleepless in Seattle (1993)

Tom Hanks had been the leading man in romantic comedies before (e.g. Splash). But the same year he took home his first Oscar (Philadelphia), he also starred opposite Meg Ryan in this »

- Joshua Gaul

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Close-Up on "Ball of Fire": Screwball Classic Skewers Stuffiness with Snappy Slang

8 January 2016 4:18 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Ball of Fire is playing on Mubi in the Us January 8 through February 7, 2016.To rephrase a popular literary adage, one shouldn’t judge a film by its credits. Many a noteworthy roster of talent has yielded a less than superior motion picture. Such is not the case, however, with the 1941 Samuel Goldwyn production, Ball of Fire. Aside from the legendary producer, who had over 100 movies under his belt by this point in his career, the film boasts an Oscar-nominated story by Thomas Monroe and Billy Wilder, a script by Wilder and frequent co-writer Charles Brackett, a supporting cast of famous faces like Dana Andrews, Dan Duryea, and Elisha Cook Jr., and superb star turns by Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck. Behind the camera, the music is by Alfred Newman, Gregg Toland is the cinematographer, Daniel Mandell is the editor, »

- Jeremy Carr

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British Film and Hollywood: What If Hitchcock Had Stayed in the UK? Interview with Film Historian Anthony Slide

5 January 2016 1:15 AM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Alfred Hitchcock, Cary Grant, and Ingrid Bergman: The 'Notorious' British (Hitchcock, Grant) and Swedish (Bergman) talent. British actors and directors in Hollywood; Hollywood actors and directors in Britain: Anthony Slide's 'A Special Relationship.' 'A Special Relationship' Q&A: Britain in Hollywood and Hollywood in Britain First of all, what made you think of a book on “the special relationship” between the American and British film industries – particularly on the British side? I was aware of a couple of books on the British in Hollywood, but I wanted to move beyond that somewhat limited discussion and document the whole British/American relationship as it applied to filmmaking. Growing up in England, I had always been interested in the history of the British cinema, but generally my writing on film history has been concentrated on America. I suppose to a certain extent I wanted to go back into my archives, »

- Andre Soares

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‘The Intern’ Review

2 January 2016 9:51 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway, Rene Russo, Anders Holm, JoJo Kushner, Andrew Rannells, Adam DeVine, Zack Pearlman, Jason Orley, Christina Scherer, Nat Wolff, Linda Lavin, Celia Weston, Steve Vinovich | Written and Directed by Nancy Myers

70-year-old widower Ben Whittaker (De Niro) has discovered that retirement isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Seizing an opportunity to get back in the game, he becomes a senior intern at an online fashion site, founded and run by Jules Ostin (Hathaway).

It’s hard to believe that it’s been six years since writer/director Nancy Myers took the reigns of a movie, what she’s been doing in the meantime I don’t know, but after seeing The Intern, I’m glad Myers and her particular brand of filmmaking, and humour, is back. Especially give just how brilliant her latest opus is. Yes, it might sound strange but even this horror-loving, »

- Phil Wheat

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995

13 items from 2016


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