IMDb > Cary Grant > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Cary Grant (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995

1-20 of 86 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The top 25 secret agents in film

27 August 2015 6:43 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ahead of American Ultra's arrival in UK cinemas, here's our pick of the 25 finest, sneakiest secret agents in film...

Operatives. Spies. Moles. Infiltrators. Secret agents go by many names. In fact, Britain's national security agency doesn't even call them agents - they're covert human intelligence sources, or simply “officers".

Whatever we choose to call them, secret agents lead necessarily furtive and obscure lives - so obscure that most of what we know about them is defined by what we've seen and read in books and movies.

During the Cold War, the image of the secret agent as a well-groomed sophisticate in a suit proliferated all over the world, and even in the high-tech landscape of the 21st century, that image still stands - just look at such movies as Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and, of course, the Bond franchise. But secret agents can come in many other guises, »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


A Unique Superstar: 20th Century Icon Garbo on TCM

26 August 2015 5:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Greta Garbo movie 'The Kiss.' Greta Garbo movies on TCM Greta Garbo, a rarity among silent era movie stars, is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” performer today, Aug. 26, '15. Now, why would Garbo be considered a silent era rarity? Well, certainly not because she easily made the transition to sound, remaining a major star for another decade. Think Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, William Powell, Fay Wray, Marie Dressler, Wallace Beery, John Barrymore, Warner Baxter, Janet Gaynor, Constance Bennett, etc. And so much for all the stories about actors with foreign accents being unable to maintain their Hollywood stardom following the advent of sound motion pictures. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer star, Garbo was no major exception to the supposed rule. Mexican Ramon Novarro, another MGM star, also made an easy transition to sound, and so did fellow Mexicans Lupe Velez and Dolores del Rio, in addition to the very British »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Forgotten Actress Bruce on TCM: Career Went from Dawn of Talkies to L.A.'s Punk Rock Scene

25 August 2015 9:02 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Virginia Bruce: MGM actress ca. 1935. Virginia Bruce movies on TCM: Actress was the cherry on 'The Great Ziegfeld' wedding cake Unfortunately, Turner Classic Movies has chosen not to feature any non-Hollywood stars – or any out-and-out silent film stars – in its 2015 “Summer Under the Stars” series.* On the other hand, TCM has come up with several unusual inclusions, e.g., Lee J. Cobb, Warren Oates, Mae Clarke, and today, Aug. 25, Virginia Bruce. A second-rank MGM leading lady in the 1930s, the Minneapolis-born Virginia Bruce is little remembered today despite her more than 70 feature films in a career that spanned two decades, from the dawn of the talkie era to the dawn of the TV era, in addition to a handful of comebacks going all the way to 1981 – the dawn of the personal computer era. Career highlights were few and not all that bright. Examples range from playing the »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 7, 'Monkey Business': No Use to Man or Beast

23 August 2015 8:01 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Previously: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 6: The Trial and Error of 'Two Scents' The Syllabus In Howard Hawks' antic comedy, "Monkey Business" (1952), buttoned-up chemist Barnaby Fulton (Cary Grant) ingests an elixir of youth and spends a freewheeling afternoon with buxom secretary Lois Laurel (Marilyn Monroe). The experience, he relates later, is one of "maladjustment, idiocy and a series of low-comedy disasters," but this screwball spirit unfortunately fails to translate to tonight's "Masters of Sex." Culminating with a scene in which Bill Masters (Michael Sheen) aims his recent cruelty at erstwhile partner Virginia Johnson (Lizzy Caplan), the episode fails to make hay from its droll premise, preferring instead a bewildering blend of squeamish humor, strange secrets, and slight camp. "Monkey Business" may be designed as a mischievous double entendre, but it blares its tired understanding of the battle of »

- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 7, 'Monkey Business': No Use to Man or Beast

23 August 2015 8:01 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Previously: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 6: The Trial and Error of 'Two Scents' The Syllabus In Howard Hawks' antic comedy, "Monkey Business" (1952), buttoned-up chemist Barnaby Fulton (Cary Grant) ingests an elixir of youth and spends a freewheeling afternoon with buxom secretary Lois Laurel (Marilyn Monroe). The experience, he relates later, is one of "maladjustment, idiocy and a series of low-comedy disasters," but this screwball spirit unfortunately fails to translate to tonight's "Masters of Sex." Culminating with a scene in which Bill Masters (Michael Sheen) aims his recent cruelty at erstwhile partner Virginia Johnson (Lizzy Caplan), the episode fails to make hay from its droll premise, preferring instead a bewildering blend of squeamish humor, strange secrets, and slight camp. "Monkey Business" may be designed as a mischievous double entendre, but it blares its tired understanding of the battle of...

»

- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Non-stop action: why Hollywood’s ageing heroes won’t give up

17 August 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Shootouts and fist-fights are no longer a young man’s game. Hollywood is rebranding ageing actors as action heroes – but it still discards older women

Male careers in the movies have always been longer than female ones, but until recently there was only one real route to on-screen immortality – to the certified, gold-standard agelessness of, say, Cary Grant. (In North By Northwest, Grant, then 55, not only appeared opposite a woman 20 years younger than him, Eva Marie Saint, his screen mother was played by someone only seven years his senior.) The key principle is suavity: the refusal to break a sweat; sophistication with the faintest hint of self‑mockery; the actor letting us know that he is old enough to know how silly this all is.

There are still disciples following that path up the mountain to the sunny uplands of longevity – perhaps we should think of this as Mount Rushmore »

- Adam Mars-Jones

Permalink | Report a problem


From Robinson's Toyboy to Intrepid Drug Smuggler: Fairbanks Jr on TCM

15 August 2015 11:31 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. ca. 1935. Douglas Fairbanks Jr. was never as popular as his father, silent film superstar Douglas Fairbanks, who starred in one action-adventure blockbuster after another in the 1920s (The Mark of Zorro, Robin Hood, The Thief of Bagdad) and whose stardom dates back to the mid-1910s, when Fairbanks toplined a series of light, modern-day comedies in which he was cast as the embodiment of the enterprising, 20th century “all-American.” What this particular go-getter got was screen queen Mary Pickford as his wife and United Artists as his studio, which he co-founded with Pickford, D.W. Griffith, and Charles Chaplin. Now, although Jr. never had the following of Sr., he did enjoy a solid two-decade-plus movie career. In fact, he was one of the few children of major film stars – e.g., Jane Fonda, Liza Minnelli, Angelina Jolie, Michael Douglas, Jamie Lee Curtis – who had successful film careers of their own. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


TV’s ‘Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Robert Vaughn on Early Influences, Natalie Wood

14 August 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

With director Guy Ritchie’s new bigscreen take on the beloved ’60s TV spy series “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” rolling out globally, the original star of that series, Robert Vaughn, is naturally busy with interviews about his iconic turn as suave master spy Napoleon Solo. Vaughn’s also recently done a one-man stage production as blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo and appeared in TV’s “Law and Order: Svu” and upcoming indie film “The American Side.” His first time in Variety was for performing in the 1954 Los Angeles revival of Gb Shaw’s “Misalliance” for the Stage Society.

Performing Shaw on stage isn’t the obvious path to playing one of our favorite spies.

My goal was always to get better roles and in my case, performing on stage really led to great opportunities. My breakthrough came when I did Calder Willingham’s “End as a Man” on stage and was spotted by Max Arnow, »

- Steven Gaydos

Permalink | Report a problem


TV’s ‘Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Robert Vaughn on Early Influences, Natalie Wood

14 August 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

With director Guy Ritchie’s new bigscreen take on the beloved ’60s TV spy series “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” rolling out globally, the original star of that series, Robert Vaughn, is naturally busy with interviews about his iconic turn as suave master spy Napoleon Solo. Vaughn’s also recently done a one-man stage production as blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo and appeared in TV’s “Law and Order: Svu” and upcoming indie film “The American Side.” His first time in Variety was for performing in the 1954 Los Angeles revival of Gb Shaw’s “Misalliance” for the Stage Society.

Performing Shaw on stage isn’t the obvious path to playing one of our favorite spies.

My goal was always to get better roles and in my case, performing on stage really led to great opportunities. My breakthrough came when I did Calder Willingham’s “End as a Man” on stage and was spotted by Max Arnow, »

- Steven Gaydos

Permalink | Report a problem


The Man From U.N.C.L.E. – The Review

13 August 2015 2:56 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Oh my, is it be “spy time” once more? Already? Wow, 2015 has been a big movie year for all those “cloak and dagger” undercover men (and women)! Early in the year, audiences were introduced to the “hush-hush” exploits of Kingsmen: The Secret Service, ripped fresh from a very adult graphic novel. As Summer began to heat up, funny lady Melissa McCarthy took satiric aim at the genre in Spy (aided by action vets Jason Statham and Jude Law). And just two weeks ago, film fans were gasping at the daredevil work of Tom Cruise, risking life and limb in his fifth go-round as Ethan Hunt, leader of the Imf in Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation (number one at the box office for the last couple weekends). And before the end of the year, the king of “gentlemen agents”, 007 Aka James Bond returns in his (official) twenty-fourth action extravaganza feature film Spectre. »

- Jim Batts

Permalink | Report a problem


Alfred Hitchcock's Top 25 Films, Ranked

13 August 2015 1:59 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Debates about Alfred Hitchcock have been raging for decades. Was he a cruel genius who treated his actors like cattle, torturing his icy blondes' performances out of them? (Some, like established movie star Grace Kelly, handled him better than others.) Some critics prefer the more whimsical British Hitchcock, tongue tucked in cheek, although his first breakout hit "The Lodger" (1927) was a sign of things to come. Clearly, Hitchcock learned from early Hollywood mentor David O. Selznick, who taught him a great deal, points out David Thomson in "The New Biographical Dictionary of Film." Over 50 years, the filmmaker always had visual flair and a distinct style, and knew how to implicate audiences in his dark, often opaque characters. Cary Grant, especially, excelled at playing charismatic men whose motives and true nature were open to interpretation, from "Suspicion" to "Notorious." Hitchcock was a true artist in the sense that he often »

- TOH!

Permalink | Report a problem


Beautiful, Talented, Scene-Stealing 'The Artist' Canine Has Died: One of Rare Four-Legged Movie Stars

12 August 2015 2:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Uggie: 'The Artist' dog star. Uggie, 'The Artist' scene-stealing dog star, has died The biggest non-human movie star of the 21st century, Uggie, whose scene-stealing cuteness helped to earn Michel Hazanavicius' The Artist the 2011 Best Picture Academy Award, has died. According to his official Facebook page, Uggie had been suffering from prostate cancer; he was euthanized last Friday, Aug. 7, '15. Born in 2002, Uggie was 13 years old. An announcement posted on Tuesday night, Aug. 11, on the Fb page Consider Uggie read: We regret to inform to all our friends, family and Uggie's fans that our beloved boy has passed away. We were not planning on posting anything until we healed a little more but unfortunately somebody leaked it to TMZ and they will be announcing it. In short, Uggie had a cancerous tumor in the prostate and is now in a better place not feeling pain. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Early Black Film Actor Has His Day

11 August 2015 8:06 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Rex Ingram in 'The Thief of Bagdad' 1940 with tiny Sabu. Actor Rex Ingram movies on TCM: Early black film performer in 'Cabin in the Sky,' 'Anna Lucasta' It's somewhat unusual for two well-known film celebrities, whether past or present, to share the same name.* One such rarity is – or rather, are – the two movie people known as Rex Ingram;† one an Irish-born white director, the other an Illinois-born black actor. Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” continues today, Aug. 11, '15, with a day dedicated to the latter. Right now, TCM is showing Cabin in the Sky (1943), an all-black musical adaptation of the Faust tale that is notable as the first full-fledged feature film directed by another Illinois-born movie person, Vincente Minnelli. Also worth mentioning, the movie marked Lena Horne's first important appearance in a mainstream motion picture.§ A financial disappointment on the »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Squirrels Unite: The Forgotten Genius of Kendrew Lascelles

11 August 2015 7:17 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

L.A. is a strange town. Where have I heard that statement before? It is unique in the

world – grown from the Hollywood seed, it has developed its own culture . . . and is,

in parts, quite dysfunctional.

A culture of creative paranoia. Did you know that an agent will not talk to anyone

unless he or she already knows that person, or there is a personal introduction.

Sound anything like Pride and Prejudice?

“Do I know you Miss Elizabeth?”

“We have yet to be introduced, Mr. Darcy.”

No one will read anything – forget a script - even an email – without a

recommendation from a trusted colleague. I pity the folk at 2000 Avenue of the Stars

when the unknown fireman tries to evacuate the building in a crisis.

“I’m sorry sir, the people on the 12th floor refuse to accept that you are a real

person. Do you have an appointment? »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’

10 August 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whatever tough-guy notion of 1960s masculinity Robert Vaughn and David McCallum once embodied as reluctantly paired Cold War rivals has clearly gone the way of the Berlin Wall in the otherwise retro-flavored “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” a PG-13-rated loose-nukes caper whose target audience is too young to remember the classic spy show that inspired it — much less the once-frosty deadlock between American capitalism and Soviet communism that pits its distractingly handsome leading men against one another. Starring Henry Cavill as American art thief Napoleon Solo and Armie Hammer as Kgb operative Illya Kuryakin, Guy Ritchie’s latest feels more suave and restrained than his typically hyperkinetic fare, trading rough-and-tumble attitude for pretty-boy posturing. And though the pic is solidly made, its elegant vintage flavor simply doesn’t feel modern enough to cut through the tough summer competition. Those seeking stylish spies will surely wait for “Spectre” or that promised “Kingsman” sequel instead. »

- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Locarno Film Review: ‘Schneider vs. Bax’

8 August 2015 11:24 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Provocative Dutch director Alex van Warmerdam puts a contract out on his own life, so to speak, in “Schneider vs. Bax,” a darkly comedic broad-daylight thriller in which two for-hire hitmen are simultaneously tasked with taking one another out. No stranger to acting in his own films, van Warmerdam casts himself as Ramon Bax, a disheveled sitting duck whose substance-abuse problem could do him in before his rival even arrives, while Tom Dewispelaere plays Schneider, who approaches the assignment like a pro, optimistic that if all goes well he’ll be home in time for a birthday dinner with his two young daughters.

A relatively straightforward genre exercise compared with last year’s Cannes-competing “Borgman,” “Schneider vs. Bax” (which has already opened in its native Netherlands, where it did arthouse business rather than action-movie numbers) likely wouldn’t have interested festivals or foreign distribs if not for the career-rekindling acclaim his previous feature attracted. »

- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Long Before Day-Lewis, Oscar-Nominated Actor Played Lincoln: TCM 'Stars' Series Continues

8 August 2015 5:19 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Raymond Massey ca. 1940. Raymond Massey movies: From Lincoln to Boris Karloff Though hardly remembered today, the Toronto-born Raymond Massey was a top supporting player – and sometime lead – in both British and American movies from the early '30s all the way to the early '60s. During that period, Massey was featured in nearly 50 films. Turner Classic Movies generally selects the same old MGM / Rko / Warner Bros. stars for its annual “Summer Under the Stars” series. For that reason, it's great to see someone like Raymond Massey – who was with Warners in the '40s – be the focus of a whole day: Sat., Aug. 8, '15. (See TCM's Raymond Massey movie schedule further below.) Admittedly, despite his prestige – his stage credits included the title role in the short-lived 1931 Broadway production of Hamlet – the quality of Massey's performances varied wildly. Sometimes he could be quite effective; most of the time, however, he was an unabashed scenery chewer, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Hepburn Day on TCM: Love, Danger and Drag

7 August 2015 4:24 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Katharine Hepburn movies. Katharine Hepburn movies: Woman in drag, in love, in danger In case you're suffering from insomnia, you might want to spend your night and early morning watching Turner Classic Movies' "Summer Under the Stars" series. Four-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Katharine Hepburn is TCM's star today, Aug. 7, '15. (See TCM's Katharine Hepburn movie schedule further below.) Whether you find Hepburn's voice as melodious as a singing nightingale or as grating as nails on a chalkboard, you may want to check out the 1933 version of Little Women. Directed by George Cukor, this cozy – and more than a bit schmaltzy – version of Louisa May Alcott's novel was a major box office success, helping to solidify Hepburn's Hollywood stardom the year after her film debut opposite John Barrymore and David Manners in Cukor's A Bill of Divorcement. They don't make 'em like they used to Also, the 1933 Little Women »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Hiroshima 70th Anniversary: Six Must-Watch Movies Remembering the A-Bomb Terror

6 August 2015 10:38 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'The Beginning or the End' 1947 with Robert Walker and Tom Drake. Hiroshima bombing 70th anniversary: Six movies dealing with the A-bomb terror Seventy years ago, on Aug. 6, 1945, the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Ultimately, anywhere between 70,000 and 140,000 people died – in addition to dogs, cats, horses, chickens, and most other living beings in that part of the world. Three days later, America dropped a second atomic bomb, this time over Nagasaki. Human deaths in this other city totaled anywhere between 40,000-80,000. For obvious reasons, the evisceration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been a quasi-taboo in American films. After all, in the last 75 years Hollywood's World War II movies, from John Farrow's Wake Island (1942) and Mervyn LeRoy's Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) to Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan (1998) and Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor (2001), almost invariably have presented a clear-cut vision »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


'Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation': Exploring Easter Eggs, Set Pieces, Stunts, Homages and Other Odds and Ends

5 August 2015 9:26 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Photo: Paramount Pictures Note: This article contains spoilers for Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation. If you haven't yet seen the movie, you've been warned. I love listening to podcasts. Whether I'm driving across town, going for a run, cleaning my house or relaxing on the couch, you're likely to find me playing a podcast to help score the scene. Some podcasts are better than others, but if you enjoy learning about movies and everything that goes into making them I encourage you to check out "The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith", in which the titular host sits down with actors, directors and writers to discuss what it takes to bring a film to the screen, from both a business standpoint and a creative one. Together they break down scenes, give background, tell stories and lend perspective on a film that listeners might not otherwise hear. Goldsmith's most recent episode is »

- Jordan Benesh

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995

1-20 of 86 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners