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‘Hereditary’ and 9 Other Indie Horror Films to Watch Next (Photos)

‘Hereditary’ and 9 Other Indie Horror Films to Watch Next (Photos)
The best scares always come from unexpected places. Within the last few years, there’s been a wake of indie horror films breaking into the mainstream. Without the same star power or effects as your typical studio horror film, these are films that rely on mood, style and character to create a feeling of dread rather than jump scares. The latest is “Hereditary,” the debut film of Ari Aster that premiered at Sundance and is quickly earning a reputation as one of the scariest movies ever. If after seeing it you’ve got a renewed taste for blood, here are nine other recent horror gems that use their modest scale to their advantage.
See full article at The Wrap »

Transilvania Film Festival Raises Curtain on 17th Edition

Transilvania Film Festival Raises Curtain on 17th Edition
Cluj, Romania — The off-beat, the avant garde and the boundary-defying take center stage at the Transilvania Intl. Film Festival, which kicked off Friday night with a soggy start to the 17th edition.

Unspooling over 10 days in the lively medieval city of Cluj, a festival known for bold and provocative programming will feature 12 films in competition for the Transilvania Trophy, starting with fest opener “Foxtrot,” Israeli director Samuel Maoz’s Oscar-shortlisted portrait of a grieving family who lose their soldier son in the line of duty.

Though evening showers threatened to turn the night into a washout, the skies cleared over the historic Piata Unirii (Union Square), where Maoz’s controversial film, which won the Silver Lion in Venice last year, played to a damp but upbeat crowd.

With lightning flashing over what the Israeli helmer described as “the biggest screen and the biggest screening my film has ever had,” Maoz
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Friday One Sheet: Silent Cry Face, Downrange

One of the greatest modern posters, in my humble opinion, is Akiko Stehrenberger's striking key art for the American remake of Michael Haneke's Funny Games. In it, we see Naomi Watts, in high-contrast close-up, hair out of place, silent tears streaming down her face: the torture of one of Hollywood's famous stars. The design has been copied in the past, namely for the Alejandro Amenábar’s Regression, a forgettable horror picture with Emma Watson. And it is not just the ladies, consider last years surprise horror hit, and Daniel Kaluuya's tears in this variant poster for Get Out. Even more recently, Emily Blunt's visage sheds a silent tear in the post-apocalytic horror picture, A Quiet Place, which (coincidentally) opens today. So along comes this design, for...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Gender Bashing: Couple Dynamics in Home Invasion Horror

*Contains spoilers for The Strangers, Funny Games, and The Purge* Many home invasion films, while not always strictly horror, play in its register (Cape Fear, Dial M For Murder). Sometimes the script is flipped, with the invader becoming the hunted (Don’t Breathe, The People Under The Stairs, The Collector) or with a lone man as […]

The post Gender Bashing: Couple Dynamics in Home Invasion Horror appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Jamie Dornan & Sam Claflin To Headline Action Thriller ‘Borderline’

Imr International announced today that BAFTA® nominee Jamie Dornan (Fifty Shades trilogy, The Fall) and Sam Claflin (Me Before You, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire) will join BAFTA® nominee Brian Kirk’s (Game of Thrones, Luther) hotly anticipated action thriller, Borderland. The adaptation was written by BAFTA® nominee Ronan Bennett (Public Enemies), and will be produced by Chris Coen (The Childhood of a Leader, Funny Games) under the Unanimous Entertainment banner, Rebecca Brown (In the Dark), and Alan Moloney (Mary Shelley, Siege of Jadotville) for Parallel Film Productions.

Imr International will introduce the project to international buyers in Berlin, CAA will represent domestic rights with UTA.

Set in 1970’s London, Borderland is a high-octane character-driven thriller, in the vein of Michael Mann’s Heat. After his wife is accidentally shot dead in Ireland, a member of the Ira takes over an Active Service Unit in the English Capital. Their mission
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Michael Haneke heading to the small screen for Kelvin’s Book

According to Deadline, Oscar and Palme d’Or-winning filmmaker Michael Haneke (Funny Games, The White Ribbon) is teaming with FremantleMedia’s Ufa Fiction for his first ever TV series, Kelvin’s Book.

The site describes the project as a ten-part high-concept series “set in a dystopian world and will tell the adventurous story of a group of young people in a not too distant future. During a flight, they are forced to make an emergency landing outside of their home and are confronted with the actual face of their home country for the first time.”

“After ten TV movies and 12 films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once,” said Haneke as part of the series’ official announcement.

“No contemporary director has moved and inspired me more than Michael Haneke,” added producer Nico Hofmann. “Kelvin’s Book is an extraordinarily rich, gripping and ambitious story. With contemporary themes and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Michael Haneke to create first TV project

Michael Haneke to create first TV project
‘After ten TV-movies and twelve films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once.’

Source: Wiki Commons

Michael Haneke

Multiple Palme d’Or winner Michael Haneke is lining up his first TV series, partnering with FremantleMedia’s Ufa Fiction on the 10-part drama Kelvin’s Book.

The story takes place in a dystopian world set in the near future as a group of young people experience an emergency landing outside their home and are confronted with the actual face of their home country for the first time.

Nico Hofmann and Benjamin Benedict will serve as executive producers on the series for Ufa Fiction.

“After ten TV-movies and twelve films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once,” Haneke said.

Haneke won consecutive Palme d’Or awards for The White Ribbon and Amour, which won the Academy Award and Golden Globe for best foreign-language film, and won two BAFTA awards. The White Ribbon
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Haneke to direct first TV project

Michael Haneke to direct first TV project
‘After ten TV-movies and twelve films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once.’

Multiple Palme d’Or winner Michael Haneke is lining up his first TV series, partnering with FremantleMedia’s Ufa Fiction on the 10-part drama Kelvin’s Book.

The story takes place in a dystopian world set in the near future and is understood will reflect on the digital age. Nico Hofmann and Benjamin Benedict will serve as executive producers on the series for Ufa Fiction.

“After ten TV-movies and twelve films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once,” Haneke said.

Haneke won consecutive Palme d’Or awards for The White Ribbon and Amour, which won the Academy Award and Golden Globe for best foreign-language film, and won two BAFTA awards. The White Ribbon earned two Oscar nods. Haneke’s credits include Funny Games, The Piano Teacher and Caché.

“No contemporary director has moved and inspired memore than Michael Haneke,” Ufa CEO Hofmann
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Haneke to Create First TV Series With 'Kelvin's Book'

Michael Haneke — the award-winning director of Amour, The White Ribbon and Funny Games — is teaming up with Germany's Ufa Fiction to create his first-ever television series.

Kelvin's Book is described as a high-concept dystopian drama set in a near future. The 10-part, English-language series will follow a group of young people who are forced to make an emergency landing outside of their home country and, for the first time, are confronted with the true face of their nation.

“After 10 TV-movies and 12 films, I wanted to tell a longer story for...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Michael Haneke to Create First TV Series With 'Kelvin's Book'

Michael Haneke to Create First TV Series With 'Kelvin's Book'
Michael Haneke -- the award-winning director of Amour, The White Ribbon and Funny Games -- is teaming up with Germany's UFA Fiction to create his first-ever television series.

Kelvin's Book is described as a high concept dystopian drama set in a near future. The 10-part, English-language series will follow a group of young people who are forced to make an emergency landing outside of their home country and, for the first time, are confronted with the true face of their nation.

“After 10 TV-movies and 12 films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once,” Haneke said in a...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Natalie Portman Boards ‘Vox Lux’ (Exclusive)

Natalie Portman Boards ‘Vox Lux’ (Exclusive)
Oscar winner Natalie Portman will officially join Jude Law in “Vox Lux,” Variety has learned. In addition, Bold Films, which is backing the project and helped develop the film, has joined forces with Andrew Lauren Productions to finance and produce the picture. “Vox Lux” is written and directed by Brady Corbet, an accomplished actors whose credits include “Mysterious Skin” and “Funny Games. He made his feature film directorial debut in 2015 with “The Childhood of a Leader,” a kind of portrait of a fascist as a very young man that won two awards at the Venice Film Festival.

Rooney Mara had originally been attached to the film and when she dropped out Portman was circling the project. However, her involvement had been in question after producer Bold Films delayed shooting on the project as part of a company-wide restructuring that resulted in staff layoffs. Bold had been bruised by the box office failure of the Jake Gyllenhaal film “Stronger
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama
Austrian writer-director Michael Haneke has made many a masterpiece – and his latest, Happy End, isn't one of them. Yet this cinematic poke in the eye about an upper class family imploding still exerts a perverse fascination. From early provocations like The Seventh Continent (1989) through later boundary-pushing works like The Piano Teacher, Cache, The White Ribbon, Funny Games (both the original and it's English-language remake) and Amour, the fillmaker specializes in the toxic indifference that can kill a family or society as a whole. He offers no easy answers. As the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem

Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem
Michael Haneke received worldwide acclaim and two Oscar nominations for his tragic romance “Amour,” the mesmerizing tale of an elderly couple facing the inevitable specter of death. Though downbeat in the Haneke fashion, “Amour” also registered as the Austrian filmmaker’s most emotionally accessible work. His followup, “Happy End,” found a more mixed response — and yet, for serious Haneke devotees, it should hit all the right buttons. Still, Haneke remains such a singular director that, 30 years into his career, he continues to challenge even his greatest devotees.

For those among us, “Happy End” delivers one of the most enjoyably twisted movies of Haneke’s career. The story of a dysfunctional bourgeois family where self-loathing and suicidal thoughts loom large, it’s a profoundly cynical work so incisive that it renewed a once-familiar element in Haneke’s career trajectory: divisiveness. Following the filmmaker’s back-to-back Palme d’Or wins for “Amour” and “The White Ribbon,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Better Watch Out’ Review

Review by Matthew Turner

Stars: Levi Miller, Olivia DeJonge, Ed Oxenbould, Dacre Montgomery, Aleks Mikic, Patrick Warburton, Virginia Madsen | Written by Chris Peckover, Zack Kahn | Directed by Chris Peckover

Previously known as Safe Neighbourhood, this Australian Christmas horror falls firmly in the tradition of other festive frighteners such as Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984) or Black Christmas (1974). However, it comes with something of a secret weapon, in the form of a sharply-executed central twist, that allows for a subversive take on the genre and a disturbing look at toxic masculinity.

Set in Smalltown, USA, Better Watch Out stars Levi Miller (Pan) as 12 year-old Luke, whose affluent parents (Virginia Madsen and Patrick Warburton, both under-used) head out to a Christmas party, leaving him in the care of their regular baby-sitter, 17 year-old Ashley (The Visit’s Oliva DeJonge). However, unbeknownst to Ashley, Luke has become quietly obsessed with her and is planning to make his move,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Better Watch Out review – the deliciously nightmarish Christmas movie of the year

Chris Peckover delivers an early seasonal treat with this blackly funny slasher about a booze-swigging boy and his babysitter staving off a shadowy assailant

How very unexpected. The Christmas movie of 2017 has turned out to be a cheerfully unpleasant and bracingly nasty horror film: an ingenious and efficient black-comic shocker unfolding in real time over one seasonal evening in a prosperous American home. The twists and lurches are interspersed with bouts of boisterous carol-singing. It looks in many ways like a garden-variety home invasion drama, with hints of Home Alone and Funny Games. But there are suggestions of something older, like a well-made stage play. Dial S for Slasher?

Levi Miller plays Luke, a sensitive, somewhat pampered 12-year-old with a major crush on his babysitter Ashley (Olivia DeJonge), who has come round to look after him while his parents – amusing cameos for Virginia Madsen and Patrick Warburton – are out at some yuletide bash.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

LOLs with Haneke: I confess to the director about creating his cat-lover Twitter parody

Oscar-winner Michael Haneke can be as tough to interview as his films can be to watch. So what happened when our writer admitted to being the creator of a parody Twitter account that turned him into a tween-talking cat-lover?

There are a number of reasons to be nervous about interviewing Michael Haneke. The 75-year-old Oscar-winner has carved out a career filled with severity, from the cold-blooded torture of Funny Games to the sadomasochistic psychology of The Piano Teacher, to the bleak account of fascism in The White Ribbon. The Austrian’s off-screen persona has often been similarly austere: he’s painted as evasive, difficult and uncooperative.

But there was an added reason for my trepidation. In 2012, I launched a parody Twitter account in Haneke’s name. It was an extended joke that reimagined the director as a tween-talking, cat-loving, remarkably petty figure, who spent his time insulting Terrence Malick and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film News Roundup: Jennifer Ehle, Emory Cohen Join Naomi Watts’ Thriller ‘Wolf Hour’

Film News Roundup: Jennifer Ehle, Emory Cohen Join Naomi Watts’ Thriller ‘Wolf Hour’
In today’s film news roundup, Jennifer Ehle joins “The Wolf Hour,” Sherilyn Fenn is starring in “For Entertainment Purposes Only,” and Gary Oldman is honored by union hair stylists and makeup artists.

Castings

Jennifer Ehle, Kelvin Harrison Jr., Emory Cohen, Brennan Brown and Jeremy Bobb have joined Naomi Watts in the psychological thriller “The Wolf Hour.”

The movie began shooting on Nov. 27 in New York with Alistair Banks Griffin directing from his own script. The project is supported by the Sundance Institute Feature Film Program.

Griffin’s first feature film “Two Gates of Sleep” screened in Director’s Fortnight at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival and competed for the Camera D’Or.

Brian Kavanaugh-Jones and Bailey Conway Anglewicz from Automatik will produce the film along with Bradley Pilz, who will fully finance and produce under his newly formed Bradley Pilz Productions. HanWay Films is overseeing international sales and distribution with CAA handling the domestic rights.

Watts portrays
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch
Sony Pictures Classics has released the trailer for “Happy End,” Michael Haneke’s semi-sequel to “Amour.” Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant reprise their roles in the film, whose title is almost certainly ironic — Haneke’s movies, like “Funny Games” and “The White Ribbon,” are among the most severe in the world. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Happy End’ Review: In This Quasi-Sequel to ‘Amour,’ Michael Haneke is a Master of Bourgeois Despair

Here’s the synopsis, courtesy of AFI Fest: “The Laurent family has issues. Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), the aging patriarch of the wealthy Callais clan, is more interested in exiting this world than enjoying it. Anne (Isabelle Huppert) has a repellent adult son to deal with, and Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz) is having a graphic online affair. The match to this tinderbox of dysfunction is adolescent Eve, who moves in after her mother’s apparent suicide attempt, and in
See full article at Indiewire »

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…
Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael Haneke“All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”The Laurent Family in ‘Happy Ending’A snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family.

What is Michael Haneke’s vision in this film? We have seen his take on the young Adonises in Funny Games, the most devastating picture of modern sociopathology I have ever seen. And his view of the pathological origin of fascism in The White Ribbon, of the political scandal of the police mass murder and civilians turning a blind eye to the plight of Algerians in France in Cache, on sexual pathology run amock in The Piano Teacher.

Happy Ending features the best actors of a generation and of Haneke’s films, Isabelle Huppert (The Piano Teacher), Jean-Louis Trintignant who played the same character in Amour, is now shown from another angle,
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’
As much as we all love a stunning tracking shot or an impeccably stylized thriller, even the most discerning cinephiles have to admit: Sometimes, you just want a good cry. Often it’s the most gut-wrenching movies that remain in our collective cultural memory the longest; “Sophie’s Choice,” “Terms of Endearment,” and “Schindler’s List,” to name just a few. Even in an age when auteur-driven driven sci-fi and superhero franchises reign supreme, Hollywood will always love a good old-fashioned tearjerker. Which is why we thought it necessary to single out some of the saddest movies of the century — so far.

Read More:The 20 Scariest Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

Though it might sound trite, one doesn’t have to give up gorgeous cinematography or a tightly-wound script in order to be moved. Not only do the films on this list find beauty in the most heartbreaking of human experiences,
See full article at Indiewire »
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