A young American studying in Paris in 1968 strikes up a friendship with a French brother and sister. Set against the background of the '68 Paris student riots.

Writers:

Gilbert Adair (screenplay), Gilbert Adair (based on the novel)
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797 ( 4)
2 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Michael Pitt ... Matthew
Eva Green ... Isabelle
Louis Garrel ... Theo / Brother
Anna Chancellor ... Mother
Robin Renucci ... Father
Jean-Pierre Kalfon ... Self
Jean-Pierre Léaud ... Self (as Jean-Paul Leaud)
Florian Cadiou ... Patrick
Pierre Hancisse Pierre Hancisse ... First Buff
Valentin Merlet Valentin Merlet ... Second Buff
Lola Peploe Lola Peploe ... The Usherette
Ingy Fillion Ingy Fillion ... Theo's Girlfriend
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Storyline

Paris, spring 1968. While most students take the lead in the May 'revolution', a French poet's twin son Theo and daughter Isabelle enjoy the good life in his grand Paris home. As film buffs they meet and 'adopt' modest, conservatively educated Californian student Matthew. With their parents away for a month, they drag him into an orgy of indulgence of all senses, losing all of his and the last of their innocence. A sexual threesome shakes their rapport, yet only the outside reality will break it up. Written by KGF Vissers

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Bertolucci returns to politics & sex. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated NC-17 for explicit sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Eva Green was surprised when the film was edited down to removed some of the nudity and sexual content. See more »

Goofs

When Matthew returns to the room to discover Theo in bed with Isabelle, Isabelle's expression and hair keeps changing position during shots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Matthew: The first time I saw a movie at the cinématèque française I thought, "Only the French... only the French would house a cinema inside a palace."
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Crazy Credits

A Carbonneutral production through Future Forests. Indigenous trees have been planted to balance the carbon dioxide created through the production of this film. See more »

Alternate Versions

US R-rated version runs ca. 3 minutes shorter than the uncut NC-17-rated version. See more »

Connections

References The 400 Blows (1959) See more »

Soundtracks

Hot Voodoo
(1932)
taken from the OST of Blonde Venus (1932)
Music by Sam Coslow
Lyrics by Ralph Rainger
Published by Famous Music Corporation/BMG Music Publishing International Ltd.
Courtesy of Universal Pictures, A division of Universal City Studio, LLP
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User Reviews

 
A romantic confession of a great filmmaker
1 August 2004 | by theachillesSee all my reviews

Paris, May 1968. Revolution breaks out and the world seems to be in a critical turning point, but inside the four walls of an apartment, three youngsters experience their very own revolution.

Yes, it's true. In the year 2004, one of the best cinematic experiences is offered by Bertolucci. Many are those who'd thought that he had nothing more to give, but with THE DREAMERS, the creator is reborn and next to his heroes he witnesses again the passage from adolescence and innocence to the age of responsibilities. A great fan of cinema himself, he doesn't hesitate to pay a number of tributes, just like Godard used to do in the past and Tarantino very recently. As he puts his view into the eyes of his protagonists, the girl and the boys seem to live inside the movies they adore. They're playing with lines from known films, they imitate characters, they put themselves into the sequences they love.

Despite their young age, all three actors not only do they show that they're worth of starring in a Bertolucci film, but they also go even further giving in every scene the necessary vividness and realistic tension. Ignoring the cosmogony taking place in the streets, they surrender to their own cosmogonic changes, to the wild sexual awakening, to the game between friendship and love, pleasure and pain. Eventually they commit themselves to the struggle between the game itself and real life. And that's where the heroes violently return in the thrilling final sequences in order to face their duty towards history.

THE DREAMERS is by far one the best motion pictures of the year, so daring but at the same time so energetic that seems able to touch anyone as a pure and romantic confession of a great filmmaker.


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Details

Country:

UK | Italy | France | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

20 February 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Dreamers See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$142,632, 8 February 2004

Gross USA:

$2,532,228

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$24,152,155
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (R-rated)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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