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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 29 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

21 August 2014 10:01 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train »

- Ricky

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Hitchcock Takes Over Paramount and State This Week

12 August 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

By Frank Calvillo

Few other filmmakers lived to see their name become synonymous with a specific brand of filmmaking quite like Alfred Hitchcock did. This month, as part of their Summer Classic Film Series, the Paramount and Stateside Theaters have lined up a weeklong tribute to Hitchcock featuring the likes of Psycho and The Birds, among other gems from the master of suspense; each of which, regardless of how many prior viewings, remains a thrilling pleasure to see on the big screen.

"We're playing the hits, and a few B-sides too," proclaims Paramount's official site in describing Hitchcock week. Hits is right with North by Northwest, Vertigo and Notorious also scheduled to screen, while "second-tier" Hitchcock classics Rebecca and Strangers on a Train (screening the following week) also make appearances. However, it's the four interestingly chosen aforementioned B-sides that prove interesting highlights and really speak to Hitchcock's versatility as a filmmaker. »

- Contributors

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Grace of Monaco review: "What was Nicole Kidman thinking?"

2 June 2014 2:19 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director: Olivier Dahan; Screenwriter: Arash Amel; Starring: Nicole Kidman, Tim Roth, Paz Vega, Milo Ventimiglia, Parker Posey, Derek Jacobi, Frank Langella; Running time: 103 mins; Certificate: PG

There are countless missed opportunities in Grace of Monaco, a sponsorship deal with Ferrero Rocher being chief among them. Like the choccies doled out by that cheapnik ambassador, this portrait of Grace Kelly 'the royal years' aspires to refinement and class when, in reality, it's just an afternoon sugar buzz for bored housewives. No wonder the Cannes glitterati turned up their noses, but you don't have to be a connoisseur to know this is a pile of Nutella.

What was Nicole Kidman thinking? For one thing she is two decades too old to be playing Grace Kelly from the late '50s to early '60s (the star was only 26 when she went from Hollywood's High Society to the House of Grimaldi). Kidman does »

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Cannes: Early Competition Films Upstage Graceless ‘Monaco’

15 May 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The 2014 Cannes Film Festival got off to an excellent start on Wednesday evening, as journalists heralded the arrival of an emotionally wrenching, fact-inspired drama set in a formerly French-ruled colony coming under threat of hostile siege. I am referring, of course, to “Timbuktu,” the deeply stirring new film from the Mauritanian-born filmmaker Abderrahmane Sissako, which had its first screening for journalists around the same time that the program’s official curtain-raiser, “Grace of Monaco,” was making its way up the red-carpeted Palais steps — its first high-profile stop en route to its final destination in cinematic oblivion.

It is, by now, a familiar formula: Kick off the proceedings with a lightweight confection that will supply all the glamour and star wattage a hot-ticket event like Cannes demands, while at the same time shocking the press next door with a hard-hitting piece of social realism. That way you get your empty-headed Hollywood frippery, »

- Justin Chang

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Review: 'Grace of Monaco' opens Cannes on a graceless note

14 May 2014 3:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

With apologies to Three Six Mafia, it's hard out here for a princess. In the past year, first-world problem films – the plush brand of non-issue cinema exemplified by last year's Cannes entry “A Castle in Italy,” in which linen-clad lunchers fretted prettily about what to do with their priceless original Brueghels – have been threatened by the Princess Problem Picture, a currently thriving subgenre that sets out to measure the true weight of a tiara. Whether the wearer is a closeted Scandi ice maiden who just wants, Garbo-style, to be left alone (“Frozen”) or a hounded British divorcee who just wants, Lauper-style, to have fun (“Diana”), female royalty hasn't seemed such a drag since the age of Henry VIII. Enter Olivier Dahan's “Grace of Monaco,” a biopic that announces its intention to further remove the scales from our eyes with an opening quote from its subject: “The idea of my life as a fairytale, »

- Guy Lodge

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​'Gaslight': 7 Everlasting Legacies of the Ingrid Bergman Classic

9 May 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

1. The term "gaslight." The Ingrid Bergman thriller "Gaslight" -- released 70 years ago this week, on May 4, 1944, wasn't the original use of the title. There was Patrick Hamilton's 1938 play "Gas Light," retitled "Angel Street" when it came to Broadway a couple years later. And there was a British film version in 1939, starring Anton Walbrook (later the cruel impresario in "The Red Shoes") and Diana Wynyard.

Still, the glossy 1944 MGM version remains the best-known telling of the tale, with the title an apparent reference to the flickering Victorian lamps that are part of Gregory's (Charles Boyer) scheme to make wife Paula (Bergman) think she's seeing things that aren't there, thus deliberately undermining her sanity in order to have her institutionalized so that he'll be free to ransack the ancestral home to find the missing family jewels.

This version of Hamilton's tale was so popular that it made the word "gaslight"into a verb, »

- Gary Susman

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Madonna, Michelle Williams, Kerry Katona: Stars playing Marilyn Monroe

23 April 2014 8:54 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Jessica Chastain has been cast as Marilyn Monroe in director Andrew Dominik's upcoming biopic Blonde.

Brad Pitt's Plan B and Worldview Entertainment will produce the adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates's 2001 novel of the same title, which Naomi Watts originally signed up to star in.

From Michelle Williams to Kerry Katona, we compile 12 other actresses who have portrayed or paid tribute to Hollywood's original blonde bombshell below.

Michelle Williams

Michelle Williams was Oscar-nominated for her critically-acclaimed performance as Monroe in Simon Curtis's My Week with Marilyn (2011). The movie centered on Monroe's fraught relationship with her then co-star Laurence Olivier, played by Kenneth Branagh, during the production of The Prince and the Showgirl in Britain.

Reflecting upon the role, Williams said: "Gosh, sometimes I can't even believe I did it because the challenges were just...

"In a way, you had to remove the fact that she was an »

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Jamaica Inn: No place for a girl

19 April 2014 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Ahead of a new TV adaptation this Easter weekend, Julie Myerson revisits Daphne du Maurier's classic tale of Cornish smugglers, and discovers a much darker novel than she remembers reading as a teenager

I was 14 when I first stumbled upon them pleasingly fat, bright yellow, cellophane-covered Gollancz hardbacks, which I carried home from Nottingham library. The pictureless covers with thick, red-and-black lettering were unapologetically, seductively adult. Rebecca. Frenchman's Creek. Mary Anne. The Parasites. Even the titles were sternly bereft of frills. These books meant business and oh, the joy of discovering that your new favourite author had written not just two or three novels, but many.

I read them all at 14 and then re-read most of them as an adult. Jamaica Inn was one of the few I'd not yet got around to, but the ghastliness of certain details had stuck. Who could forget that godforsaken tavern in the »

- Julie Myerson

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Linkomaniac Pt. 1

18 March 2014 10:52 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The Daily Beast talks to Uma Thurman about Lars von Trier and gender politics

Five Thirty Eight parses Shakespeare and finds that Romeo & Juliet have a relationship that's not totally based on getting to know one another. Duh!

The Wire reviews Doll & Em, a new miniseries starring Emily Mortimer 

Playbill Katharine McPhee has landed a series lead gig in a CBS show called Scorpion. (I guess they never saw Smash?)

Salon on the eve of the release of Divergent, a reminder that not every Ya best-seller aiming for Hunger Games phenom status succeeds: Beautiful Creatures, City of Ember, The Host and more...

The Guardian Brittany Murphy's final film, Something Wicked, is completed four years after her death

Vulture 294 "issues" Glee has addressed in its first 99 episodes

Variety they went really young casting Peter Pan for that self proclaimed "international" and "diverse" Pan film which keeps casting white people in »

- NATHANIEL R

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Oscars 2014: What Are the Odds of a Best Picture-Best Director Split?

26 February 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The 85-year history of the Academy Awards is rife with statistical oddities, and one that has the potential to play out this Sunday is among the most intriguing: a split between the films that win Best Picture and Best Director.

Though conventional wisdom has long held that only one film will walk away with both prizes on Oscar night, many pundits are predicting that the awards will instead go to two different movies this year, with "Gravity" director Alfonso Cuaron expected to snag the Best Director statuette, while "12 Years a Slave" (or "American Hustle," depending on where your loyalties lie) is the favorite to win Best Picture.

While such a split has occurred just 22 times since the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences started handing out trophies in 1929, four of the first five ceremonies produced a divide between the Best Director and Best Picture prizes. "Wings," dubbed the original »

- Katie Roberts

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Underrated Hitchcock

25 February 2014 9:00 PM, PST | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

Alfred Hitchcock never won an Oscar as Best Director, but the first year he worked in Hollywood he made a pair of memorable films. Rebecca was nominated for 11 Academy Awards (including Best Director) and won two, for George Barnes’ cinematography and for Best Picture. The second release, which appeared in theaters just four months later, also earned a handful of nominations—including Best Picture—but isn’t cited as often as it should among the director’s finest work. Foreign Correspondent is one of my all-time favorites and it’s been given deluxe treatment in a terrific new Blu-ray/DVD release from The Criterion Collection. In a video essay called “Hollywood Propaganda and World War...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] »

- Leonard Maltin

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Oscar Loves a Woman on the Edge: Eight Iconic Best Actress Snubs (Clips)

25 February 2014 10:40 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Why does cinema favor the mad woman? It's easy to see why Oscar does: roles like Jasmine French give an actress space to not only chew but swallow and spit up scene after scene. Cate Blanchett will almost certainly win Best Actress this year for her frittered, diabolical performance in "Blue Jasmine" as cinema's archetypical woman-on-the-verge: that pill-popping, martini-swilling mad Medea who men fear and women sometimes dream of (being? playing? escaping into?).Thus, here are eight classic Oscar snubs in the Best Actress category. Bow down to Gena Rowlands in "A Woman Under the Influence." Watch clips after the jump. Also, check out our Toh! feature on eight scene-stealing female performances from 2013.1940 Who Won: Ginger Rogers ("Kitty Foyle") Who Should've Won: Joan Fontaine ("Rebecca") Who Was Nominated: Bette Davis ("The Letter"), Katharine Hepburn ("The Philadelphia Story"), Martha Scott ("Our Town") Hitchock's delirious and deliciously twisted English gothic »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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The greatest Best Actor race? Where does this year's class rank in Oscar history?

24 February 2014 3:20 PM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

This year’s Best Actor race is shaping up to be one of the greatest of all time. And by greatest, I mean both the most competitive and also the most outstanding, in the sense that each nominee is excellent — hypothetical winners in almost any other year. They also reflect the depth of superb male performances in 2013. Consider: Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips), Robert Redford (All Is Lost), Joaquin Phoneix (Her), Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis), and Michael B. Jordan (Fruitvale Station) all missed the cut.

EW’s Owen Gleiberman recently analyzed this year’s Best Actor race, calling it the most “fiercely, »

- Jeff Labrecque

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New on Video: ‘Foreign Correspondent’

20 February 2014 9:48 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Foreign Correspondent

Written by Charles Bennett and Joan Harrison

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

USA, 1940

As if his British films weren’t evidence enough of his talent, Alfred Hitchcock made quite the impression when he came to Hollywood in 1940. His first picture in the states, Rebecca, was nominated for Best Picture at the 1941 Academy Awards. So was his second, Foreign Correspondent, also released in 1940. While Rebecca would ultimately win, many – then and now – consider the achievement as belonging more to producer David O. Selznick than to the director. This is not without some justification. Though Rebecca bears more than a few notably Hitchcockian touches, between the two features, Foreign Correspondent looks and feels more appropriately like Hitchcock’s previous and later works. The Criterion Collection, recently very kind to Hitchcock on Blu-ray, now gives this latter feature a suitably well-rounded treatment, with a documentary on the film’s visual effects, an »

- Jeremy Carr

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The Prototype For Alfred Hitchcock’s American Movies

18 February 2014 10:30 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

After directing more than twenty feature films in Britain, Alfred Hitchcock’s big introduction to Hollywood came in the form of two films released only four months apart in 1940, both of which were nominated for that year’s Best Picture Academy Award. The gothic chamber drama Rebecca ended up taking home the Oscar, while the trans-continental wartime adventure Foreign Correspondent eventually became all but a footnote in the Hitchcock canon. While Rebecca is no doubt a complex, layered masterwork with its fair share of brilliant Hitchcockian touches (check out IndieWire’s excellent take on the film’s lesbian themes), critics and historians have contended that Rebecca was at least as much a David O. Selznick film as it was a Hitchcock entry. In fact, Hitch himself told Truffaut that he didn’t see Rebecca as a Hitchcock picture because of its lack of humor. But Foreign Correspondent (whose Criterion treatment was released this week) displays a more »

- Landon Palmer

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Criterion Collection: Foreign Correspondent | Blu-ray Review

18 February 2014 8:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Criterion adds another illustrious Alfred Hitchcock title to the collection this month with Foreign Correspondent, which followed hot on the heels of Rebecca in 1940, the beginning of the director’s American period. Though not a perfect film, it does register as one of his most unfairly overlooked films, even as it shows various signs of outside tampering as a film belonging very much to the period in which it was made. Though suffering from the effect of too many cooks in the writing kitchen, it’s a title as filled with plot twists as it is wit, as well as Hitchcock’s signature elaborate set pieces.

Opening with a dedication to the bravery of those foreign correspondents and others that risk their lives in war time, we enter into the realm of a Us newsroom where frustration is running high at the lack of actual coverage worthy news filtering in from the correspondents. »

- Nicholas Bell

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The Best Blu-ray/DVD Releases of the Week: ‘Foreign Correspondent’ and the Third Season of ‘Game of Thrones’

18 February 2014 8:00 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. Game of Thrones: The Complete Third Season The naval assault against the Lannisters has failed, and that little prick Joffrey remains atop the throne. Elsewhere, Daenerys is gathering an army to join her and her trio of dragons, Robb Stark is working to mend fences and create allies, and the White Walkers are continuing their ridiculously slow journey towards civilization. I’ve never read the novels, and I can’t imagine doing so without photos so I can recognize who’s who in the enormous list of characters, but this is some wonderfully dense and entertaining television. Season three continues to follow numerous story threads and characters, and while some are more engaging than others there’s not a single dud among them. The production value remains high resulting not only in strong performances »

- Rob Hunter

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'Foreign Correspondent' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

17 February 2014 9:32 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent is exactly the kind of film that benefits from a Criterion Collection release. I don't consider this to be one of Hitch's "best", but at the same time it's got the elements that make his films fascinating, and, most importantly, entertaining. And Criterion always does a great job bringing a focus to some of Hitchcock's less discussed gems. Add to that, Foreign Correspondent carries an additional weight as a result of its place in history as a propaganda film, emphasized most in Joel McCrea's speech at the end of the film amid the bombing of London, warning those back in the U.S. just what exactly Germany was up to. The scene was added after filming had already wrapped, just over a month before the film would actually hit theaters. Following Rebecca, Foreign Correspondent was Hitchcock's second American feature. Both would be nominated for »

- Brad Brevet

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Blu-ray Review: Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Foreign Correspondent’ Joins Criterion Club

15 February 2014 7:11 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Cinema history has a few great double-up years: 12-month periods in which a classic filmmaker had not one but two great films. Mel Brooks may be the most notorious, releasing two of the best comedies of all time in 1974 (“Blazing Saddles” & “Young Frankenstein”) and Steven Spielberg has arguably done it a few times, inarguably in 1993 (“Jurassic Park” & “Schindler’s List”) and he would double-up again in 2002 (“Minority Report” & “Catch Me If You Can”) and 2011 (“Tintin” & “War Horse”).

One of the most-often forgotten double-up years was Alfred Hitchcock’s first year as an American filmmaker — 1940, which saw the premiere of “Rebecca” in April and “Foreign Correspondent” in August. The former has been a Criterion inductee for years and the latter joins the most important club in Blu-ray/DVD history this week in a finely-transferred and wonderfully accompanied release.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

Rebecca” has the higher historical pedigree, largely because it’s less dry »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Review: Hitchcock's "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), Criterion Dual Format Release

15 February 2014 3:32 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Hitchcock’s War Face

By Raymond Benson

Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film Foreign Correspondent is often underrated or forgotten when it comes to lists of the director’s “best” films. In fact, it was nominated for an Oscar Best Picture the same year as Rebecca (which won), and, personally, I think it’s the better movie. It’s certainly more of a “Hitchcock film” than Rebecca, as it is one of those cross-country espionage adventure-thrillers along the lines of The 39 Steps, Saboteur, and North by Northwest.

It was the director’s second Hollywood movie. Although Hitchcock was contracted to David O. Selznick (who produced Rebecca), Hitch’s deal allowed Selznick to “farm out” the director to other studios and producers, for a piece of Hitchcock’s salary, of course. In this case, Foreign Correspondent was produced by Walter Wanger (who had also produced John Ford’s Stagecoach). It’s interesting that »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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