The Betsy (1978) - News Poster

(1978)

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Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became a member of the WGA East in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Film Review: ‘Assassin’s Creed’

Film Review: ‘Assassin’s Creed’
It used to be that when a highly touted actor — a prestigious actor, a thespian — agreed to star in a piece of schlock, he might be grateful for the work, but the job was still undertaken with a pinch of shame. When Laurence Olivier played a leering rapacious soap-opera gloss on Henry Ford in Harold Robbins’ “The Betsy” (1978), or when Michael Caine gallivanted around the globe to star in paycheck movies from “Blame It On Rio” to “Jaws: The Revenge,” no one was fooling anybody.

How times have changed. “Assassin's Creed,” in which Michael Fassbender plays some sort of leaping, fighting, time-tripping — but still moody and sullen — bare-chested historic warrior dude, is a mediocre video-game movie that has branded itself in a most revealing way. The film is coming off 20 years of soullessly trashy and forgettable video-game spinoffs (the “Mortal Kombat” and “Streetfighter” films, “Max Payne” and “BloodRayne,” the “Lara Croft” series,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Stage Tube: On This Day for 5/22/16- Laurence Olivier

Happy Birthday, Laurence Olivier Born in 1907, Olivier remains one of the most revered actors of the 20th century. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. Olivier's career as a stage and film actor spanned more than six decades and included a wide variety of roles, from the title role in Shakespeare's Othello and Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night to the sadistic Nazi dentist Christian Szell in Marathon Man and the kindly but determined Nazi-hunter in The Boys from Brazil. Olivier played more than 120 stage roles Richard III, Macbeth, Romeo, Hamlet, Othello, Uncle Vanya, and Archie Rice in The Entertainer. He appeared in nearly sixty films, including William Wyler's Wuthering Heights, Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca, Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, Otto Preminger's Bunny Lake Is Missing, Richard Attenborough's Oh What a Lovely War,
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

King of the Gypsies | Blu-ray Review

A forgotten gem of the late 1970s comes to Blu-ray for the first time, Frank Pierson’s adaptation of the novel King of the Gypsies. Notable for several reasons, namely as the credited debut for actor Eric Roberts and a star studded cast packed to distraction, this is the kind of pulp oddity often whisked off the shelves of the bestseller list for glossy cinematic reinterpretation. This gypsy saga was based on a novel by Peter Maas, better known as the biographer of Serpico, which resulted in the novel inspiring Sidney Lumet’s classic 1973 film starring Al Pacino. Eventually, Maas’ works, often revolving around sensational true crime treatments, would be adapted mainly for television (including the 1991 Valerie Bertinelli Lifetime film, In a Child’s Name), and this sometimes outlandish antique feels like an exaggerated heirloom in the Harold Robbins’ vein (The Carpetbaggers; The Betsy; The Adventurers), a frumpy comparison
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Stage Tube: On This Day for 5/22/15- Laurence Olivier

Happy Birthday, Laurence Olivier Born in 1907, Olivier remains one of the most revered actors of the 20th century. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. Olivier's career as a stage and film actor spanned more than six decades and included a wide variety of roles, from the title role in Shakespeare's Othello and Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night to the sadistic Nazi dentist Christian Szell in Marathon Man and the kindly but determined Nazi-hunter in The Boys from Brazil. Olivier played more than 120 stage roles Richard III, Macbeth, Romeo, Hamlet, Othello, Uncle Vanya, and Archie Rice in The Entertainer. He appeared in nearly sixty films, including William Wyler's Wuthering Heights, Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca, Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, Otto Preminger's Bunny Lake Is Missing, Richard Attenborough's Oh What a Lovely War,
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84
William Bast, who wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two biographies of James Dean, died of complications from Alzheimer’s on May 4. He was 84.

Bast wrote scripts for episodes of series including “Combat!,” “Perry Mason,” “Ben Casey,” “The Outer Limits,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Honey West,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Mod Squad” and “It Takes a Thief.” He also wrote scripts for the BBC and British Independent Television, adapted Jean Giradoux’s play “Tiger at the Gates” for Granada Television and wrote episodes for classic series “The Prisoner.”

In 1976 he received the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for his telepic “The Legend of Lizzie Borden,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery. His 1977 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Man in the Iron Mask,” with Richard Chamberlain in the dual role, was nominated for an Emmy, and in 1982 his script for “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” with Anthony Andrews and Ian McKellen,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84
William Bast, who wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two biographies of James Dean, died of complications from Alzheimer’s on May 4. He was 84.

Bast wrote scripts for episodes of series including “Combat!,” “Perry Mason,” “Ben Casey,” “The Outer Limits,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Honey West,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Mod Squad” and “It Takes a Thief.” He also wrote scripts for the BBC and British Independent Television, adapted Jean Giradoux’s play “Tiger at the Gates” for Granada Television and wrote episodes for classic series “The Prisoner.”

In 1976 he received the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for his telepic “The Legend of Lizzie Borden,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery. His 1977 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Man in the Iron Mask,” with Richard Chamberlain in the dual role, was nominated for an Emmy, and in 1982 his script for “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” with Anthony Andrews and Ian McKellen,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

John Osborne on Film: The Entertainer

Part I. Anger, Suez and Archie Rice

“There they are,” George Devine told John Osborne, surveying The Entertainer‘s opening night audience. “All waiting for you…Same old pack of c***s, fashionable assholes. Just more of them than usual.” The Royal Court had arrived: no longer outcasts, they were London’s main attraction.

Look Back in Anger vindicated Devine’s model of a writer’s-based theater. Osborne’s success attracted a host of dramatists to Sloane Square. There’s Shelagh Delaney, whose A Taste of Honey featured a working-class girl pregnant from an interracial dalliance; Harold Pinter’s The Room, a bizarre “comedy of menace”; and John Arden’s Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance, which aimed a Gatling gun at its audience. Devine encouraged them, however bold or experimental. “You always knew he was on the writer’s side,” Osborne said.

Peter O’Toole called the Royal Court actors “an
See full article at SoundOnSight »

R.I.P. Edward Herrmann

Long-time character actor Edward Herrmann has lost a battle with brain cancer and has died at the age of 71. Herrmann was known for his strikingly tall physical presence, kind and sympathetic demeanour, and distinct voice. He is best remembered for his countless supporting parts in numerous films and TV shows.

Amongst his big screen works are key roles in films such as "The Lost Boys," "Overboard," "The Aviator," "The Cat's Meow," "Nixon," "Annie," "Reds," "The Great Gatsby," "The Betsy," "Intolerable Cruelty," "Born Yesterday," "The Great Waldo Pepper," "Harry's War," "Rko 281," "The Paper Chase," "Big Business," and "Richie Rich".

On the small screen he is best known for his regular role as Richard Gilmore on "Gilmore Girls," narrating countless History Channel docos, and guest starring roles galore on shows like "The Practice," "Oz," "Grey's Anatomy," "30 Rock," and two "Eleanor and Franklin" TV movies for which he scored Emmy nominations. He
See full article at Dark Horizons »

R.I.P. Edward Herrmann

Long-time character actor Edward Herrmann has lost a battle with brain cancer and has died at the age of 71. Herrmann was known for his strikingly tall physical presence, kind and sympathetic demeanour, and distinct voice. He is best remembered for his countless supporting parts in numerous films and TV shows.

Amongst his big screen works are key roles in films such as "The Lost Boys," "Overboard," "The Aviator," "The Cat's Meow," "Nixon," "Annie," "Reds," "The Great Gatsby," "The Betsy," "Intolerable Cruelty," "Born Yesterday," "The Great Waldo Pepper," "Harry's War," "Rko 281," "The Paper Chase," "Big Business," and "Richie Rich".

On the small screen he is best known for his regular role as Richard Gilmore on "Gilmore Girls," narrating countless History Channel docos, and guest starring roles galore on shows like "The Practice," "Oz," "Grey's Anatomy," "30 Rock," and two "Eleanor and Franklin" TV movies for which he scored Emmy nominations. He
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Stage Tube: On This Day 5/22- Laurence Olivier

Happy Birthday, Laurence Olivier Born in 1907, Olivier remains one of the most revered actors of the 20th century. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. Olivier's career as a stage and film actor spanned more than six decades and included a wide variety of roles, from the title role in Shakespeare's Othello and Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night to the sadistic Nazi dentist Christian Szell in Marathon Man and the kindly but determined Nazi-hunter in The Boys from Brazil. Olivier played more than 120 stage roles Richard III, Macbeth, Romeo, Hamlet, Othello, Uncle Vanya, and Archie Rice in The Entertainer. He appeared in nearly sixty films, including William Wyler's Wuthering Heights, Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca, Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, Otto Preminger's Bunny Lake Is Missing, Richard Attenborough's Oh What a Lovely War,
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Stage Tube: On This Day 5/22- Laurence Olivier

Happy Birthday, Laurence Olivier Born in 1907, Olivier remains one of the most revered actors of the 20th century. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. Olivier's career as a stage and film actor spanned more than six decades and included a wide variety of roles, from the title role in Shakespeare's Othello and Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night to the sadistic Nazi dentist Christian Szell in Marathon Man and the kindly but determined Nazi-hunter in The Boys from Brazil. Olivier played more than 120 stage roles Richard III, Macbeth, Romeo, Hamlet, Othello, Uncle Vanya, and Archie Rice in The Entertainer. He appeared in nearly sixty films, including William Wyler's Wuthering Heights, Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca, Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, Otto Preminger's Bunny Lake Is Missing, Richard Attenborough's Oh What a Lovely War,
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Oscars 2013: do his three Oscars make Daniel Day-Lewis the greatest?

Arguing whether Daniel Day-Lewis is a greater actor than, say, Laurence Olivier is like arguing whether Messi is more talented than Pelé. It's not just down to the statistics

Statistically speaking, with his third best actor Oscar in hand, Daniel Day-Lewis is now officially the greatest actor of all time. But statistics lie. Richard Burton, the greatest actor of his generation, was nominated for six Oscars and never won. Roberto Benigni did. Cary Grant, who almost single-handedly invented motion pictures, never won an Oscar. F Murray Abraham did. Heath Ledger, the most gifted actor of his generation, won his first and only Oscar – for best supporting actor – after he was dead. Art Carney, Nicolas Cage and Richard Dreyfuss were all very much alive when they were singled out as best actor of the year. Yes, Art Carney. As previously noted, statistics lie. Especially when they involve Nicolas Cage.

Arguing whether
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Stage Tube: On This Day 5/22- Laurence Olivier

Happy Birthday, Laurence Olivier Born in 1907, Olivier remains one of the most revered actors of the 20th century. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. Olivier's career as a stage and film actor spanned more than six decades and included a wide variety of roles, from the title role in Shakespeare's Othello and Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night to the sadistic Nazi dentist Christian Szell in Marathon Man and the kindly but determined Nazi-hunter in The Boys from Brazil. Olivier played more than 120 stage roles Richard III, Macbeth, Romeo, Hamlet, Othello, Uncle Vanya, and Archie Rice in The Entertainer. He appeared in nearly sixty films, including William Wyler's Wuthering Heights, Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca, Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, Otto Preminger's Bunny Lake Is Missing, Richard Attenborough's Oh What a Lovely War,
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Kenneth Branagh: The star who forgot how to shine

Two decades ago, Kenneth Branagh was "the new Olivier". Now he's directing a comic-book adaptation. Why? Because he was never meant to be an idol

In 1989, when he was not yet 30 years old, Kenneth Branagh appeared in a stirring version of William Shakespeare's Henry V. The film, which Branagh also directed, won tons of awards. God, was it stirring. Everybody thought the St Crispin's Day speech was just terrific, even the French, who came out somewhat worse for wear at the Battle of Agincourt and whom Shakespeare despised. Everybody wondered where this combustible young talent had come from. The answer: Belfast. Since the cultural megalith Laurence Olivier had already produced, directed and starred in his own Oscar-winning Henry V 44 years earlier, the year Adolf Hitler finally went down for the count, and since Branagh had more than held his own in this revival, it seemed obvious that the actor was throwing down the gauntlet,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hollywood's late bloomers

Hollywood may be obsessed with youth and speed, but just occasionally age and wisdom win out. Joe Queenan on the late bloomers who make a good case for biding one's time

Early next year, Annette Bening will garner an Oscar nomination for her tart, intense performance as Julianne Moore's control-freak lover in The Kids Are All Right. She could just as easily be nominated for her tart, intense performance as a neurotic middle-aged healthcare professional in the underrated film Mother and Child, another engaging arthouse release that surfaced a few months ago. In effect, after more than a decade of working infrequently, and even then mostly appearing in duds (Being Julia, The Women, Running with Scissors ) Annette Bening is making a serious comeback at the age of 52, 20 years after most leading ladies have arrived at the expiration date for their careers.

What makes this return to centre stage even
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Paul Ryan Rudd Died of Pancreatic Cancer

Beloved Broadway, film and television star Paul Ryan Rudd has lost his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 70. The entertainer died at his home in Greenwich, Connecticut on Thursday, August 12.

His Broadway credits include "The National Health" in 1974, a 1975 revival of Eugene O'Neill's "Ah, Wilderness!", and a revival of "The Glass Menagerie" that same year. He also starred in the original production of John Guare's comedy "Bosoms and Neglect" in 1979, was part of the original Broadway cast of David Rabe's "Streamers" in 1976, and starred as Romeo in a 1977 production of "Romeo and Juliet". Alongside Meryl Streep and Philip Bosco, Rudd played the title role in a 1976 production of "Henry V" for the New York Shakespeare Festival.

On U.S. television, he starred in "Beacon Hill", and in 1977 TV movie "Johnny We Hardly Knew Ye". He also appeared in "The Betsy", the 1978 film based on the Harold Robbins novel,
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Broadway Star Rudd Loses Cancer Battle

  • WENN
Beloved Broadway, film and television star Paul Ryan Rudd has lost his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 70.

The entertainer died at his home in Greenwich, Connecticut on Thursday.

His Broadway credits include The National Health in 1974, a 1975 revival of Eugene O’Neill’s Ah, Wilderness!, and a revival of The Glass Menagerie that same year.

He also starred in the original production of John Guare’s comedy Bosoms and Neglect in 1979, was part of the original Broadway cast of David Rabe’s Streamers in 1976, and starred as Romeo in a 1977 production of Romeo and Juliet.

Alongside Meryl Streep and Philip Bosco, Rudd played the title role in a 1976 production of Henry V for the New York Shakespeare Festival.

On U.S. television, he starred in Beacon Hill, and in 1977 TV movie Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye. He also appeared in The Betsy, the 1978 film based on the Harold Robbins novel, and continued his TV career throughout the 1980s with guest roles on TV series Hart to Hart, Moonlighting and others before leaving acting to raise his children.

Rudd is survived by his second wife, Martha Bannerman, their three children, Graeme, Kathryn and Eliza and his mother, Kathryn Rudd.

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