A radical American journalist becomes involved with the Communist revolution in Russia, and hopes to bring its spirit and idealism to the United States.

Director:

Warren Beatty
Won 3 Oscars. Another 19 wins & 37 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Warren Beatty ... John Reed
Diane Keaton ... Louise Bryant
Edward Herrmann ... Max Eastman
Jerzy Kosinski ... Grigory Zinoviev
Jack Nicholson ... Eugene O'Neill
Paul Sorvino ... Louis Fraina
Maureen Stapleton ... Emma Goldman
Nicolas Coster ... Paul Trullinger
M. Emmet Walsh ... Speaker - Liberal Club
Ian Wolfe ... Mr. Partlow
Bessie Love ... Mrs. Partlow
MacIntyre Dixon MacIntyre Dixon ... Carl Walters
Pat Starr ... Helen Walters
Eleanor D. Wilson Eleanor D. Wilson ... Mrs. Reed
Max Wright ... Floyd Dell
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Storyline

American journalist John Reed journeys to Russia to document the Bolshevik Revolution and returns a revolutionary. His fervor for left-wing politics leads him to Louise Bryant, then married, who will become a feminist icon and activist. Politics at home become more complicated as the rift grows between reality and Reed's ideals. Bryant takes up with a cynical playwright, and Reed returns to Russia, where his health declines. Written by Jwelch5742

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Taglines:

Not since Gone With The Wind has there been a great romantic epic like it!


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Reportedly, Warren Beatty would, at times, have two or three actors or actresses on stand-by for some parts, and only chose the one he wanted right at the last minute. See more »

Goofs

The film depicts Bryant first meeting Emma Goldman in Reed's Greenwich Village apartment. In fact, Bryant knew Emma Goldman from Portland, where she (along with her husband, Alexander Berkman) had been hosted by Bryant and her husband, Paul Trullinger. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Witness 1: [voiceover] Was that in 1913 or 17? I can't remember now. Uh, I'm, uh, beginning to forget all the people that I used to know, see?
Witness 2: [voiceover] Do I remember Louise Bryant? Why, of course, I couldn't forget her if I tried.
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Crazy Credits

As the credits roll, additional interviews with the 'witnesses' play. See more »

Alternate Versions

3 seconds of horse falls were cut from the British version. The DVD supplements showing these shots are also cut in England. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Waiting for Ishtar (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

The Engine
Performed by Moscow Radio Chorus
Recording courtesy of Folkways Records
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User Reviews

You Forget..
16 November 2008 | by tedgSee all my reviews

.

I am old enough to have lived through (probably) three different Americas. These are radically different worlds. It isn't just the mood, styles or state of the economy; its the adoption of a whole cosmology. Religions change under our feet. Family, love, belonging. These things are malleable yet largely beyond our control and we forget what "things were like." Memory always is constructed in terms of the present world.

Always.

So projects like this are necessary. We cannot know who we are unless we remind ourselves who we were.

The ordinary fold here is a romance, folded into grand political actions. Here they are a bit more cerebral than usual, but never getting past the notion of simple justice.

The more unusual and complex fold is that we see a story based on real events and people. Interspersed with that story are interviews of people who were personally involved in the story. These are remarkable, the way they are captured and the way they are edited to overlap with and annotate the story. But much more engaging is that these are enticing people, many with minds and phases that invite us into their faces — made warmer and more open by Beatty's camera. I compare this to the "Up" serious and the contrast is astonishing. True, here we want to be informed about the lives of others, and the "Up" goals pretend that the people randomly selected decades ago are remotely worth knowing.

But these folks are. We want more, simply based on their implicit invitation, and we carry ourselves into the narrative more forcefully, sort of like the characters do. This is folding doing its job and doing it well. They remember. I remember, and therefore am.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.


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Details

Country:

USA | UK | Canada

Language:

English | Russian | German | French | Finnish | Italian

Release Date:

25 December 1981 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Reds: The John Reed Story See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$32,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,325,029, 6 December 1981

Gross USA:

$40,382,659

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$40,382,659
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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