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The Forgotten: The Animated Adventures of Václav Bedrich

4 hours ago | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

You never hear about the nice things Hitler did. Probably there are very good reasons for that. But one thing he did do, or cause to be done, was boost the production of animated films in Czechoslovakia in the 40s, to make up for the fact that Hollywood cartoons, very popular in Europe, were now understandably no longer available. After the war, the animation studios kept going, and a wave of brilliant movies in a variety of media swept the film festivals and even crept onto TV in the west.Václav Bedrich began his directing career in 1950, as best we can judge from the patchy credits on the IMDb (several of the films I'm about to discuss are not listed there). In 1969 or 1970 he released the first of seven adventures made in the style of the adventure serials of the 1910s (i.e. Fantômas), but produced in cut-out animation form. »

- David Cairns

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What Did Cannes 2015 Teach Us About the Oscar Race? (Podcast)

4 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Can You Trust the Hype From Cannes? If you've been paying attention to Indiewire over the past few weeks, you know that the Cannes Film Festival consumed a lot of our time lately. While the festival finally ended over the weekend, however, there are still many reasons to discuss its lineup. Many of the more notable titles from the program scored distribution, and a lot of them are surefire bets for the fall season circuit. But does that automatically make them Oscar contenders? Not so fast. While Jacques Audiard's immigration drama "Dheepan" won the Palme d'Or, that doesn't guarantee it will automatically make its way into the foreign language race. In fact, there are other Cannes contenders that may already be ahead in that regard. Meanwhile, Todd Haynes' "Carol" seems like a strong contender for Best Picture -- but "seems" is the operative word here. We're »


- Indiewire

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James Ponsoldt To Direct F. Scott Fitzgerald Drama 'West Of Sunset'

5 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

James Ponsoldt is leaving much space for breathing room. His latest film "The End Of The Tour" is fresh off a Sundance premiere and is hitting theaters next month (check out the trailer). And next in line is perhaps his starriest effort yet with the Tom Hanks starring adaptation of Dave Eggers' "The Circle." And now the director has another hot project on his plate.  Deadline report the filmmaker will write and direct the F. Scott Fitzgerald tale "West Of Sunset." Just to be clear this is about Fitzgerald, not based on his writing. Instead, the movie is based on the novel by Stuart O'Nan who chronicles the final, tragic years of the writer before he died in 1940. Here's the book synopsis:  In 1937, F. Scott Fitzgerald was a troubled, uncertain man whose literary success was long over. In poor health, with his wife consigned to a mental asylum and his finances in ruins, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Review: 'I Believe In Unicorns' Is A Fresh, Creative, And Entirely Original Story Of Young Love

5 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

A much discussed topic in the film world recently has been the dearth of women directors in mainstream filmmaking and the impact that this has on the representation of girls and women, and their experiences on screen. Thankfully, the independent film world has a much better track record with female filmmakers, and writer/director’s Leah Meyerhoff’s “I Believe in Unicorns” is a fine example of just why a female point of view can be so important, so necessary in capturing female stories. An all-too-familiar and complicated story of young love is the premise of ‘Unicorns,’ but Meyerhoff brings a fresh, creative, and entirely original take to the tale, weaving together a work that is at once fantastical, evocative and starkly realistic. Natalia Dyer stars as Davina, a luminous young teen—a dreamer and an artist who longs for more outside of her small and bleak life caring for her disabled single mother. »

- Katie Walsh

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Watch: Red Band Trailer For Award Winning Feminist Psychological Thriller 'Felt'

5 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Amy Everson and Jason Banker deliver what’s sure to be an intense and gut-twisting experience in their new docu-narrative, “Felt.” Inspired by Everson’s own life—though to what degree is unclear—“Felt” takes direct aim at modern rape culture. Co-written by the duo and directed by Banker, the film follows Amy, a woman struggling with the lasting pain of past sexual trauma, which is compounded by the male-dominated world in which she lives. As a coping method, she fabricates male-inspired alter egos, made complete by morbid costumes that endow her with a sense of power she has lost since her assault. However, the personas she invents become increasingly unpredictable and violent. A new red band trailer for the film recently went online—you can check it out below. Everson is a relatively unknown talent. With only one other credit—voice work on Hernando Bansuelo’s “A Reunion”—audiences »

- Zach Hollwedel

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Hou Hsiao-hsien, Catherine Hardwicke, And Will Gluck Prepping New Films

6 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It took eight long years between Hou Hsiao-hsien's "Flight Of The Red Ballon" and his latest, Cannes Best Director prize winning "The Assassin." And the good news for fans of the filmmaker is that he's already brewing his next picture and hopefully it won't be so long to get it made it. His next project is about "a waterway enthusiast who encounters a river goddess while studying the city’s waterway system" and it will be set in the modern era. Shu Qi will return to star with Chu Tien-wen ("The Assassin," "Millennium Mambo") penning the script. No word yet on when production start. [Taipei Times] Catherine Hardwicke will tackle another tale about young people, signing up to helm "Love Letters To The Dead." An adaptation of the book by Ava Dellaira (who will also write the script) it "centers on a character named Laurel who for an English class assignment »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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How This First-Time Director Made One of the Most Authentic Female Coming-of-Age Films in Recent Memory

6 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As Leah Meyerhoff was beginning production on "I Believe in Unicorns," her first feature film, she reached out to other female filmmakers to get their advice and support. Before long, the group morphed into Film Fatales, a loose network of female filmmakers who meet regularly to mentor each other and collaborate on projects. Meyerhoff's film is one of three new and recent indies, along with Eliza Hittman's "It Felt Like Love" and Marielle Heller's "Diary of a Teenage Girl," to tell a coming-of-age story from a female perspective (all three directors are members of Film Fatales). "Unicorns" focuses on Davina (Natalia Dyer), an imaginative teenage girl who escapes life with her disabled mother (played by Meyerhoff's mother, Toni Meyerhoff) by diving into an intense and volatile relationship with an older boy (Peter Vack). The film was inspired by Meyerhoff's own life experiences. Indiewire recently spoke to the writer-director about. »


- Paula Bernstein

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Brooklyn Film Festival Announces Lineup for 18th Edition, Will Open with 'Manson Family Vacation'

6 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Brooklyn Film Festival, now in its 18th year, has announced their lineup of narrative and documentary films. 108 features and shorts were selected, from 26 countries and five continents. The festival will open with the East Coast premiere of J. Davis' "Manson Family Vacation," starring Jay Duplass and Linas Phillips.  Read More: Duplass Brothers' 'Manson Family Vacation' To Open 18th Annual Brooklyn Film Fest The theme of this year's festival, "Illuminate," was described by Bff executive director Marco Ursino as an attempt to "spotlight storytelling without boundaries and welcome multi-layered stories, including the abstract and the inspirational, the intriguing and the ironic. The festival is simply looking for projects that reflect a creative, furious, explosive, and uncontainable intelligence." Many of the films screening at Bff also have a New York connection, including Ryan Carmicheal's "But Not For Me," the only »


- Becca Nadler

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Simon Pegg Says 'Star Trek 3' Starts Shooting In 4 Weeks & The First Draft Of The Script Has Only Just Been Finished

6 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Paramount may want to kindly advise Simon Pegg to stop talking so much about "Star Trek 3" already. The actor and screenwriter for the next installment of the sci-fi franchise recently revealed that before he came on, the studio had rejected a draft of the screenplay of the movie for being too "Star Trek"-y, and that they were aiming for something with more four-quadrant appeal (think "The Avengers"). Now Pegg reveals that, mere weeks from shooting, the script he's co-writing with Doug Jung is only now crossing the desk of executives. “We started again six months before we were due to start shooting, which is insane! In fact...we start shooting in Vancouver in four weeks – and we’re only handing in our first draft today,” Pegg told Radio Times. They don't say when the interview took place, but it was presumably around the same time he made his »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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HBO Orders Two Seasons of Duplass Brothers' Animated Series 'Animals' Following Sundance Debut

7 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Behold the power of Sundance. Or the Duplass brothers. Or "Animals" itself. HBO has ordered the Duplass-produced Sundance entry to series with a two-season commitment. Though the network does dabble in animated comedy, it's only released two in the last 15 years — "The Ricky Gervais Show" and "The Life & Times of Tim" — and neither lasted longer than three seasons.  Read More: 'Animals' Creators on Mark Duplass and If Film Fests are the Future of Indie TV "Animals" premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this past January, generating good word-of-mouth from a screening of two episodes and Q&A immediately after. Matarese and Luciano's half-hour comedy features different animals living in New York City, personifies their problems and presents each with a stark, grey color palette with voices from an exceptional cast. Mark Duplass — who executive produces the series with his brother Jay, both of whom created the HBO »


- Ben Travers

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The Word 'Mumblecore' Turns 10 Years Old This Year. Can We Stop Using It Now?

7 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Guy Pearce and Cobie Smulders Take Center Stage in Posters for Sundance Hit 'Results' Almost exactly 10 years ago, Andrew Bujalski was being interviewed by Indiewire contributor Michael Koresky when the filmmaker made an off-the-cuff remark that would haunt him. Shortly after the premiere of Bujalski's sophomore feature "Mutual Appreciation" at the South by Southwest Film Festival, the same week that his debut "Funny Ha Ha" landed on DVD, Bujalski was asked about other contemporary filmmakers whose work — as Koresky put it — "harmonized" with his own. Bujalski recalled rumblings of a "movement" at SXSW, the same year that Joe Swanberg's debut "Kissing on the Mouth" premiered and the Duplass brothers' "The Puffy Chair" won an audience prize.  "My sound mixer named the movement 'mumblecore,'" Bujalski said, "which is pretty catchy." In short order, Bujalski wouldn't think so. Two years »


- Eric Kohn

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Watch: Vintage 24-Minute Talk With Orson Welles About Television, 'War Of The Worlds,' 'Citizen Kane,' & More

7 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This is a fun way for any filmmaker or fan to end the week. Eyes on Cinema recently uploaded a full 24-minute interview with Orson Welles, originally broadcast in 1955. The discussion aired as part of “Press Conference – A series in which personalities who make the news answer impromptu questions from men who write the news.” Then 39-years-old, Welles had yet to make any notable television appearance, a fact which moderator William Hardcastle readily points out. Right out of the gate, he asks the master thespian and filmmaker why has he avoided television when he has seized every other medium? Hardcastle narrows his question down further, and this is where it really gets interesting (especially in hindsight). Hardcastle asks, “What do you think of television as an art form? Can it ever be as good like cinema?” Read More: Retrospective: The Directorial Films Of Orson Welles Given that we’re living »

- Zach Hollwedel

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Watch: 'Mad Max: Fury Road' Gets Gnarly '80s Trailer Treatment

8 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

More than any other movie this year, "Mad Max: Fury Road" has fans going to see it more than once, with some even seeing it on the big screen more than twice. It's an action lover's feast that even snooty cinephiles can love, and a movie that brings old school thrills in very modern trappings, which is why this latest recut works so well. Read More: George Miller's 'Mad Max: Fury Road' Starring Charlize Theron And Tom Hardy The Playback Collective has put together an '80s style trailer for the movie and it's pretty fun stuff. While 'Mad Max' never is or was related to schlockmeister studio Cannon Films, their logo at the beginning makes total sense in this context. Powered by Power Glove's "Vengeance" (which frankly wouldn't sound entirely out of place in a Nicolas Winding Refn movie), this is a nice treat for those »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Tony Zhou In Praise of Chairs

8 hours ago | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Video essayist Tony Zhou recently griped about the preponderance of Fincher, Scorsese, Anderson, Nolan, etc. dissections, and has since turned his efforts to more unusual facets in film history. His latest video, for instance, explores the role of the chair — or, an extension of the production designer — in storytelling. With a wide range of clips, he interrogates the furniture as a conduit for a person, a situation, and the filmic context. »

- Sarah Salovaara

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Watch: Daniel Brühl, Cara Delevingne & Kate Beckinsale Mix The Media & Murder In New Trailer For 'The Face Of An Angel'

8 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

These days, the notion of blind justice is an aspirational ideal rather than an actual reality. The minute a sizzling story hits the headlines, the truth depends on which light you choose to shine on the facts. The more high profile the case, the more distorted and blurred the lines become, and that's what Michael Winterbottom investigates in "The Face Of An Angel." Starring Daniel Brühl, Cara Delevingne, and Kate Beckinsale, the film is inspired by the Amanda Knox story, and follows a movie director who travels to Italy to investigate the case of a young student accused of murder for an upcoming movie. But he sees a whole other side of things after befriending an international journalist and falling into a relationship with a young bartender, and as it goes on, Winterbottom's film is less interested in the murder that kicks off the chain of the events than in »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: 'Kung Fury' Short Will Make Your Brain Explode With '80s Nostalgia

9 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: The 2015 Indiewire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During Run of Festival The production history of Stockholm-based filmmaker David Sandberg's sensational '80s-themed action short "Kung Fury" is a tale for the ages. Sandberg's idea developed its initial momentum when he launched a Kickstarter campaign for his "Kung Fury" idea and uploaded a trailer for the concept that caught people's attention. Within 24 hours, he had raised $200,000 and by the end of the campaign one month later, Sandberg had raised $630,000 from 17,713 backers. Couple the success of the crowdfunding campaign with the film's Cannes Film Festival debut for the film and you've got a legend in the making. As previously announced, following its Cannes debut, the full short premiered on YouTube on May 28 and we have embedded it at the top of this page for you to watch. Pro tip: If you go fullscreen for this one, »


- Shipra Harbola Gupta

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Watch: 'King Fury' Short Will Make Your Brain Explode With '80s Nostalgia

9 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: The 2015 Indiewire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During Run of Festival The production history of Stockholm-based filmmaker David Sandberg's sensational '80s-themed action short "King Fury" is a tale for the ages. Sandberg's idea developed its initial momentum when he launched a Kickstarter campaign for his "King Fury" idea and uploaded a trailer for the concept that caught people's attention. Within 24 hours, he had raised $200,000 and by the end of the campaign one month later, Sandberg had raised $630,000 from 17,713 backers. Couple the success of the crowdfunding campaign with the film's Cannes Film Festival debut for the film and you've got a legend in the making. As previously announced, following its Cannes debut, the full short premiered on YouTube on May 28 and we have embedded it at the top of this page for you to watch. Pro tip: If you go fullscreen for this one, »


- Shipra Harbola Gupta

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Jason Statham Says 'Layer Cake' Sequel 'Viva La Madness' Will Shoot In 2016

9 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

You may have forgotten, as I totally did, that a couple of years back it was announced that Jason Statham will star in "Viva La Madness," the sequel to Matthew Vaughn's breakout film, "Layer Cake," which made a star out of Daniel Craig. Not much has been heard about the project since, but according to Statham, it's all systems go. "J.J. Connelly's written a great book called 'Viva La Madness,' and we're taking that book and doing something great with it," the actor told Digital Spy about about the sequel novel, penned by the original author. "He's such a talented writer. The book was incredible. I loved 'Layer Cake' and this is, if anything, better. The chance to work with someone of that caliber, to do something back home, it's the most exciting thing on my plate. We're doing it next year, and it's full steam ahead. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Bruce Campbell is Back in Bloody New 'Ash vs. Evil Dead' Teaser

9 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Though there's no sign of the boom stick, Ash seems well-prepped to again take on the Deadites in this brief but bloody new teaser. From the minds of original creator Sam Raimi, star Bruce Campell and producer Rob Topert comes "Ash vs. Evil Dead," the Starz horror series set to pick up 30 years after we last saw the chainsaw-wielding monster murderet do what he does best. Reprising his role as the titular Ash, Campbell resurfaces in the series as an aging stockboy who's been trying to avoid anything meaningful since he last conquered evil. But when a Deadite plague threatens mankind, out comes Ash's most lethal weapons: the chainsaw, boom stick and sarcastic comments.  "Ash vs. Evil Dead" premieres this fall on Starz with Lucy Lawless as a mysterious figure who suspects Ash is the source of all evil. Pablo Simon Bolivar becomes our hero's new sidekick, but Jill Marie Jones »


- Ben Travers

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Cannes: Why Jeremy Saulnier Didn't Make a Studio Movie After 'Blue Ruin'

9 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: How Jeremy Saulnier Went From Corporate Videos to Premiering 'Blue Ruin' at Cannes When Jeremy Saulnier arrived at the Cannes Film Festival's Directors Fortnight in 2013 to premiere his tense revenge thriller "Blue Ruin," he was at the end of a long road. Having worked for years producing corporate videos while developing his career as a cinematographer on sleeper hits like "Putty Hill" and "Septien," Saulnier had completed just one feature as a director — 2007's Slamdance-winning "Murder Party" — and struggled for years to get another one off the ground. It was worth the wait: "Blue Ruin" scored a lucrative distribution deal with Radius-twc, struck a chord with genre fans around the world, and suddenly turned Saulnier into a in demand director.  However, despite the many offers that came his way, Saulnier once again paved his own path. This month, he was back at Cannes with his follow-up, »


- Eric Kohn

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