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1-20 of 69 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


New image of Brian Cox in D-Day drama Churchill

26 September 2016 10:45 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Thanks to Empire, we’ve got a new image from Churchill, director Jonathan Teplitzky’s upcoming biopic of the British wartime leader, which explores the 48 hours leading up to D-Day and stars Brian Cox as the legendary British Prime Minister. As you’d expect, he looks like he’s got the weight of the world on his shoulders – perhaps Michael Bay should show send him some dailies from Transformers: The Last Knight to cheer him up…

May 23rd, 1944: as tensions mount in the 48-hours preceding D-Day, the now-beleaguered Prime Minister Winston Churchill, played by Brian Cox (The Bourne Supremacy, X-Men 2, Zodiac, War & Peace, Troy), must prepare a final attempt to crush Hitler’s encroaching army. With the entire War effort ultimately hinging on this decision, the stakes have never been higher. As the Wartime leader clashes with his generals, tension builds with the Americans, and Churchill must wrestle his »

- Gary Collinson

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Liev Schreiber on Making ‘The Bleeder,’ Why Punches Had to Be Real

2 September 2016 7:31 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Bleeder” is the true story of Chuck Wepner, the liquor salesman/boxer from New Jersey who in 1975 went 15 rounds with Muhammad Ali, and inspired the 1976 hit “Rocky.” It is a passion project for Liev Schreiber, who plays Wepner and is also one of the producers of the film that world premiered out-of-competition in Venice Sept. 2. Schreiber talked to Variety about the challenges of getting it on the screen and why he wanted the punches to be real.

You clearly have a deep personal involvement in this film. Can you tell me how it came about? 

More than 10 years ago Naomi told me that an editor friend of hers had a script that they were trying to get to me. I guess they knew that I liked boxing. I read the script and I knew who Chuck was peripherally. In my limited knowledge of the history of boxing I was »

- Nick Vivarelli

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‘Elvis & Nixon’ Exclusive Behind-The-Scenes Clip: Michael Shannon & Kevin Spacey Talk Bringing Their Characters to Life

18 July 2016 8:08 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Elvis & Nixon” captures the unlikely meeting two of the biggest cultural figures of their time — a rock ‘n’ roll legend and the President of the United States. On a December morning in 1970, Elvis Presley (Michael Shannon), the King himself, showed up at the front gate of The White House to request a meeting with President Richard Nixon (Kevin Spacey) to make him an undercover agent in the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. What follows is a delightful, revealing meeting between two powerful figures, forever immortalized in the single most requested photograph in the National Archives. Watch an exclusive behind-the-scenes clip below featuring Michael Shannon, Kevin Spacey, Johnny Knoxville, and more talk about bringing the story to life.

Read More: Review: ‘Elvis & Nixon’ Starring Michael Shannon And Kevin Spacey

The film is directed by Liza Johnson, who has previously directed “Return,” starring Linda Cardellini, Michael Shannon, and John Slattery, and “Hateship, »

- Vikram Murthi

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New image from Churchill starring Brian Cox as filming wraps

27 June 2016 6:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

A few weeks back we brought you a first look image of Brian Cox as Winston Churchill in director Jonathan Teplitzky’s upcoming biopic of the legendary British Prime Minister, and now Salon Pictures has debuted another still from Churchill to mark the end of principal photography, which sees Cox joined by Ella Purnell and Miranda Richardson.

May 23rd, 1944: as tensions mount in the 48-hours preceding D-Day, the now-beleaguered Prime Minister Winston Churchill, played by Brian Cox (The Bourne Supremacy, X-Men 2, Zodiac, War & Peace, Troy), must prepare a final attempt to crush Hitler’s encroaching army. With the entire War effort ultimately hinging on this decision, the stakes have never been higher. As the Wartime leader clashes with his generals, tension builds with the Americans, and Churchill must wrestle his inner-demons in order to navigate the Allies to victory.

Miranda Richardson (Harry Potter, Testament of Youth) plays beloved wife Clemmie Churchill, »

- Gary Collinson

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‘Documentary Now!’ Stands Out in the Emmys’ Variety Sketch Race

15 June 2016 9:46 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Spliced together from interviews, establishing shots, and dramatic reenactments, its subjects’ homegrown aphorisms set against the forceful tinkling of the score, “The Eye Doesn’t Lie” might’ve been made by Errol Morris himself.

Inspired by “The Thin Blue Line,” the fourth episode of IFC’s inventive, erudite “Documentary Now!” — from the frenzied imaginations of director Rhys Thomas and “Saturday Night Live” alumni Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, and Seth Meyers — mimics the filmmaker’s work so precisely that it comes to resemble an X-ray, showing the bone structure of his distinctive style while (gently) poking fun at it. In this sense, to describe “Documentary Now!” as a parody is to undersell: It’s a wildly funny act of criticism, deconstructing the mechanics of nonfiction in an age defined by the slippage between “reality” and the real.

Starring Armisen and Hader in an ever-changing series of roles—in a pungent send-up of Vice Media, they even play three indistinguishable pairs of plaid-clad, ne’er-do-well correspondents on the trail of a Mexican drug kingpin — “Documentary Now!” is designed with an in-depth knowledge of the form, down to the title sequence. A clever nod to public television, replete with evolving logo, synthesized theme music, and Helen Mirren’s refined introductions, the homage to the likes of “Pov,” “Frontline,” and “Independent Lens” is telling. Though tough, at times, on the familiar tropes of Morris and the Maysles, the creators’ treatment of documentaries is affectionate; their approach is closer to Christopher Guest’s warm, playful comedies, from “Waiting for Guffman” to “For Your Consideration,” than to the sharp satire of “Drop Dead Gorgeous” or “Tanner ’88.”

This is born, it seems, of their interest in the power of nonfiction narratives, and in the process by which such stories take shape. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, “Documentary Now!” is lavish in its praise — Hader’s version of Little Edie Beale, in the series’ tribute to “Grey Gardens,” replicates several memorable moments in the film almost exactly — but it’s when the series turns toward exaggeration and hyperbole that its understanding of the form’s fakery is on fullest display. Against the “direct cinema” aesthetic of the Maysles, “Documentary Now!” depicts the siblings, here known as the Feins, eliciting performances from their subjects, searching the shadows of “Sandy Passage” for the most compelling variant of the truth. (It comes back to bite them, in a way that acknowledges the elements of Gothic horror in “Grey Gardens” by blowing the original to bits.)

Understanding documentaries as a set of narrative techniques, and not simply as a reflection of “the facts,” “Documentary Now!” is at its most astute in the first season’s “Kunuk Uncovered.” Based on 1988’s “Nanook Revisited,” itself an investigation of the stagecraft in Robert Flaherty’s 1922 silent, “Nanook of the North,” “Kunuk” renders explicit the series’ animating principle: “Was the first documentary a documentary at all,” the narrator intones, “or was it something else?” As William H. Sebastian (John Slattery) attempts to mold his subject, Pipilok (Armisen), into the “Eskimo” of his ethnocentric assumptions, mounting dog sledding and spear fishing scenes, he loses control of the project to its central figure. “Kunuk” becomes an artful farce, part Hollywood excess and part careful craft.

Pipilok first demands compensation, securing the managerial services of a local pimp, and then displaces Sebastian altogether, transforming into a tortured auteur. (At one point, he curses out the cast in his native tongue, a true diva of the directing chair.) His aesthetic innovations — recording sound, building sets, developing “point of view” and new forms of movement — are those, roughly speaking, of realism, and “Kunuk” is, in essence, a reminder that the style that doesn’t seem like a style is no less fabricated for convincing us otherwise. In “Documentary Now!” nonfiction is always “something else”: A performance, a manipulation, a construction, adjacent to “the real” but not a mirror image of it.

In fashioning a new short film for each installment—with the exception of the two-part “Gentle and Soft: The Story of the Blue Jean Committee” — the series is an outlier in the Emmys’ nascent Variety Sketch category. Last year’s inaugural field featured five nominees on the traditional “sketch” model, including “Saturday Night Live” and winner “Inside Amy Schumer,” and all, including the final season of the excellent “Key & Peele,” are among this year’s twenty eligible series (up from 17). But given the TV Academy’s tendency to settle into firm patterns, to the point that one might call them ruts, it would behoove voters to honor the heterodox, learned, distinctly non-topical comedy of “Documentary Now!” while the contours of the category are still in flux.

If there’s one aspect of the series we know Academy members can appreciate, it’s the brilliant impression: Schumer and Ryan McFaul were nominated last year for directing the dead solid perfect satire “12 Angry Men Inside Amy Schumer” as if inhabited by the spirit of Sidney Lumet, a feat “Documentary Now!” manages many times over, and in myriad registers. Its sketches succeed, in the end, because they’re not sketchy at all, but rather fully realized, remarkably savvy reconsiderations of their subject, which is the creative, sometimes-deceptive act of documentary filmmaking itself.

“The Eye Doesn’t Lie” recalls not only “The Thin Blue Line,” then, but also, by dint of its title, the filmmaker’s examination of visible evidence in “Standard Operating Procedure.” “The pictures spoke a thousand words,” as Army Special Agent Brent Pack says in the latter of photographs of prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib, launching into the kind of Morris-esque paradox that IFC’s series so beautifully distills. “But unless you know what day and time they were taken, you wouldn’t know what story they were telling.” The eye does lie, of course, and the brilliant “Documentary Now!” is always catching it red-handed.

Related storiesHow 'Mike Tyson Mysteries' Season 2 Pushed Wacky Retro Designs Even Further (Emmy Watch)Taraji P. Henson's 'Empire' Highlight Reel Has to Be Seen to Be Believed'You're the Worst' Star Aya Cash Explains Why You Shouldn't Vote For Her at the Emmys (But You Really, Really Should) »

- Matt Brennan

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Women in Refrigerators: Why Female Representation in Superhero Movies Needs to Evolve

9 June 2016 10:50 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Henry Bevan on why female representation in superhero movies needs to evolve…

The X-Men: Apocalypse billboard featuring Oscar Issac’s Apocalypse choking Jennifer Lawrence’s Mystique has created a lot of negative noise. Actress/activist Rose McGowan called the billboard out for its “casual violence against women” and Fox has apologised for its tone-deafness. Flickering Myth’s Kirsty Capes articulately argues against McGowan’s points, but even if the awesome Mystique gives “as good as she gets”, Apocalypse‘s box office figures suggest the X-Men aren’t the most popular superhero property and the casual viewer will not understand the advert’s context or how it is playing with iconography — all they will see is Ivan Ooze strangling ginger Smurfette, a man victimising a woman.

The situation raises important questions about how female characters are represented in superhero cinema. Women are frequently storytelling props and are victimised to further the »

- Henry Bevan

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‘Front Page’ Revival Adds Holland Taylor, Dylan Baker & Robert Morse To Ink-Stained Cast

9 June 2016 4:58 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

A starry list of stage and screen vets, several with marquee-quality drawing power from roles on popular TV shows, have joined the cast of The Front Page, the Scott Rudin-mounted revival with already-announced headliners Nathan Lane, John Slattery, Jefferson Mays and Sherie Rene Scott. Fresh to the bill are Holland Taylor (Two and a Half Men) and Robert Morse (Mad Men), along with Dylan Baker (The Good Wife, The Americans) and Patricia Conolly, Halley Feiffer, Dann… »

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2016 Emmy Contenders: Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series

7 June 2016 2:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

A previous winner for “The West Wing,” Bradley Whitford was awarded his second Emmy last year thanks to his work as Marcy on “Transparent.” Whitford could well repeat [for playing a different character, Magnus Hirschfeld], or he could be stopped by one of multiple funny men playing themselves.

Saturday Night Live” always takes up spots on this list with its hosts and this year gave us a lot to choose from, including a giggly Ryan Gosling and the emotional return of Tracy Morgan. Still, it will be hard to top the hosting gig of “SNL’s” resident Bernie Sanders impersonator Larry David when he appeared opposite the actual Democratic candidate. David practically joined the “SNL” cast this year, popping in from time to time to play the presidential candidate in sketches.

Also stealing scenes in the political world were Martin Mull, Peter MacNicol and John Slattery in “Veep.” MacNicol has already won one Emmy, for “Ally McBeal, »

- Jenelle Riley

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Review: 'Veep' Season 5 Episode 6 'C**tgate' Screws Everybody

29 May 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Last Week's Review: 'Veep' Season 5 Episode 5 'Thanksgiving' Sets the Table Immediate ReactionAs much as I'd like to repeat last week's immediate reaction, considering that Jonah now seems that much closer to holding real power, "C**tgate" had so much going on that even the man who failed to chop wood correctly couldn't hold sole focus. First off, we all saw Catherine's announcement coming, right? Oh, no. Not the Marjorie part. We had about the same reaction as Gary — slightly bewildered joy — to Selina's secret service agent holding hands with the First Daughter, but Catherine telling her mother why she kept dumping men set up her new partner perfectly (as did Selina's refusal to hear from her daughter as she desperately and repeatedly reached out).  Sadly, we had to say goodbye to Charlie Baird (John Slattery) this week, as his company will be filing for Chapter 11 after Selina's difficult decision to »

- Ben Travers

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Review: 'Veep' Season 5 Episode 6 'C**tgate' Screws Everybody

29 May 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last Week's Review: 'Veep' Season 5 Episode 5 'Thanksgiving' Sets the Table Immediate ReactionAs much as I'd like to repeat last week's immediate reaction, considering that Jonah now seems that much closer to holding real power, "C**tgate" had so much going on that even the man who failed to chop wood correctly couldn't hold sole focus. First off, we all saw Catherine's announcement coming, right? Oh, no. Not the Marjorie part. We had about the same reaction as Gary — slightly bewildered joy — to Selina's secret service agent holding hands with the First Daughter, but Catherine telling her mother why she kept dumping men set up her new partner perfectly (as did Selina's refusal to hear from her daughter as she desperately and repeatedly reached out).  Sadly, we had to say goodbye to Charlie Baird (John Slattery) this week, as his company will be filing for Chapter 11 after Selina's difficult decision to »

- Ben Travers

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Jonathan Teplitzky begins shooting Churchill bio-drama with Brian Cox

25 May 2016 5:55 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Brian Cox as Churchill.

Shooting has begun in Scotland on Jonathan Teplitzky's next film, Churchill, starring Brian Cox as the man himself.

The film was written by Alex von Tunzelmann, best known for her Guardian column Reel History,.on the historical accuracy - or not - of certain movies.

Churchill takes place in the forty-eight hours leading up to D-Day in May 1944, and, given it marks von Tunzelmann's feature debut, is presumably unimpeachable on historical grounds.

Joining Cox in the cast are Miranda Richardson as Churchill's wife Clemmie, John Slattery as Eisenhower, James Purefoy as George VI and Ella Purnell as Churchill's secretary.

Teplitzky (The Railway Man, Better Than Sex) said that "to work with Brian Cox and see him play such an icon will be an incredible experience..

Producers are Nick Taussig and Paul Van Carter of Salon Pictures with Piers Tempest and Jo Bamford.s Tempo Productions, »

- Staff Writer

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First Look: Brian Cox Stars in Jonathan Teplitzky’s ‘Churchill’

24 May 2016 2:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Jonathan Teplitzky’s “Churchill,” starring Brian Cox, has started principal photography, and the first image has been released.

Miranda Richardson, “Mad Men” star John Slattery and James Purefoy recently joined the cast. Richardson plays the British leader’s wife Clemmie, Slattery is General Eisenhower, Purefoy is King George VI, and rising-star Ella Purnell plays Churchill’s secretary.

Action is set on May 23, 1944, as tensions mount in the 48-hours preceding D-Day. Churchill must prepare a final attempt to crush Hitler’s encroaching army. With the war effort hinging on this decision, the stakes have never been higher. As the wartime leader clashes with his generals, tension builds with the Americans, and Churchill must wrestle his inner-demons in order to navigate the Allies to victory.

Pic is directed by Teplitzky (“The Railway Man,” “Marcella”), and written by British historian and author Alex von Tunzelmann.

The film, which was developed with the assistance of the BFI, »

- Leo Barraclough

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'Churchill' shoot begins; cast revealed

24 May 2016 3:14 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

First look at Brian Cox as the wartime leader as Miranda Richardson, John Slattery, James Purefoy and Ella Purnell join cast.

Salon Pictures has announced that principal photography has begun in Scotland on its new feature film, Churchill.

Brian Cox (The Bourne Supremacy) plays the Second World War leader in the 48-hours preceding D-Day in May 1944, when Churchill had to prepare a final attempt to crush Hitler’s encroaching army.

The cast is rounded out with Miranda Richardson (Harry Potter, Testament of Youth) as wife Clemmie Churchill, with John Slattery (Mad Men) as General Eisenhower, James Purefoy (Rome) as King George VI, and rising-star Ella Purnell (Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Tarzan) joining the cast as Churchill’s secretary.

Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky (The Railway Man), the film is written by British historian and author Alex von Tunzelmann in her feature debut.

Churchill was developed with the assistance of the BFI. Producers are [link »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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First look at Brian Cox as Winston Churchill in new biopic

23 May 2016 9:10 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With production getting underway today, Salon Pictures has released a first look image of Brian Cox as Britain’s wartime leader Winston Churchill in the biopic Churchill from director Jonathan Teplitzky (The Railway Man).

”I am looking forward to bringing this iconic but complex figure to life,” states Cox. “It’s the role of a lifetime for me and I’m so pleased to be taking this journey with both Jonathan and our great cast.”

”I’m very excited and thrilled to be shooting Churchill,” adds Teplitzky. “To work with Brian Cox and see him play such an icon will be an incredible experience. But also working with the rest of the cast and our wonderful crew is a real privilege as we strive together to make a great film’

May 23rd, 1944: as tensions mount in the 48-hours preceding D-Day, the now-beleaguered Prime Minister Winston Churchill, played by Brian Cox (The Bourne Supremacy, »

- Gary Collinson

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What happens when young Howard Stark finds out what happened to old Howard Stark?

19 May 2016 11:20 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I spent a few hours this afternoon interviewing people associated with Preacher, AMC's adaptation of the beloved — and seemingly unadaptable — '90s comic book series. (My review of it is here.) One of those was with the show's leading man, Dominic Cooper, who already has experience in the comic book adaptations world through his role as the young version of Howard Stark in various Marvel movies and TV shows. The bulk of our conversation (which I'll publish down the road) was about Preacher, and the larger issue of how a classically trained actor who didn't read comics growing up keeps winding up in filmed versions of them, but at one point the talk pivoted to Howard Stark — who, in the older version played by John Slattery, is a major part of the plot of Captain America: Civil War — and something unexpected occurred: Cooper asked me to spoil the movie for him. »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Spotlight DVD Review: “A shocking & astonishing classic”

19 May 2016 5:05 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Spotlight is a modern day classic and what makes it specifically special, and rightfully shocking, is that this isn’t fiction. Here we follow the real-life story of the Boston Globe’s investigative news team as they worked tirelessly over a year to uncover the appalling scandal of child abuse within the Catholic Church. It shows us the work the journalist team put together and the problems that came their way as this local story eventually stretched out across the world. Once the story broke; people who suffered abuse began to come forward to tell their story. This wasn’t just a few priests, it was thousands.

If you like your tight-scripted drama with a compelling narrative that’s effortlessly portrayed by a wonderful ensemble cast, then this is definitely your kind of film. The underlying story might be one of true, horrific truths but what Spotlight does is concentrate »

- Dan Bullock

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Where Captain America: Civil War Falls Short for Marvel and Women

9 May 2016 6:31 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Further exploration of Marvel’s Women Problem.

We’ve come a long way from the Dark Ages of Comics, when men dominated the industry and the general assumption was that female characters were expendable plot points that no one would miss, because women didn’t read comics. The fridging and subsequent re-birth of Barbara Gordon as Oracle proved a crucial turning point for the industry as a whole, ushering in a new wave of representation in mainstream comics. Today, Marvel Comics has taken inclusion to greater heights: Thor is a woman, Ms. Marvel is a Muslim-American teenager, The Hulk is a Korean-American whiz kid, and Devil Dinosaur has found a new companion in the wonderful Lunella Lafayette, a Black pre-teen living on the Lower East Side of New York.

But how well does this translate into the Marvel Cinematic Universe?

With the advent of the long-anticipated Captain America: Civil War, Marvel Studios »

- Jamie Righetti

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Film Review #2: Captain America: Civil War

6 May 2016 7:16 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

To say that explosive new Marvel superhero movie, Captain America: Civil War, started the summer blockbuster season with a bang would be the understatement of the year.  And to fail to recognize the strong cultural phenomenon that these movies represent would be equally foolish.  It is not only buildings and bad guys that are in peril when these wily superheroes are around: box office records recoil in fear of their imminent demise too.

All of this is to say that, regardless of whatever one or an army of critics may think of these movies, they will fill the seats in droves and do A-Ok.  But, allow me to make myself the most disliked guy in the room by asking, from the perspective of someone not immersed in the comic book universe that spans the movies, what the big deal is about.

Don’t get me wrong: Captain America, with its »

- J Don Birnam

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Movie Review – Captain America: Civil War (2016)

6 May 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Captain America: Civil War, 2016.

Directed by Joe Russo & Anthony Russo.

Starring Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, Don Cheadle, Elizabeth Olsen, Paul Rudd, Jeremy Renner, William Hurt, Emily VanCamp, Tom Holland, Martin Freeman, Chadwick Boseman, Daniel BrühlPaul Bettany, Marissa Tomei, John Kani, John Slattery, Hope Davis, Frank Grillo, and Stan Lee.

Synopsis:

Political interference in the Avengers’ activities causes a rift between former allies Captain America and Iron Man.

Captain America: Civil War isn’t perfect and may have an overstuffed narrative, but your satisfaction detector is beyond busted if you aren’t having fun with this supersized latest entry into the Marvel Cinematic Universe by the time the opposing teams of Captain America and Iron Man race towards each other full speed at an airfield hangar with the sole intention of kicking each other’s asses. That’s the exact moment you can »

- Robert Kojder

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Latest (Surprisingly Entertaining) Marvel Movie Pits Rebel Avengers vs. Status Quo Avengers

5 May 2016 11:59 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Captain America: Civil War': Chris Evans as rogue military leader of sorts. 'Captain America: Civil War' review: So good it made film critic and Prince fan forget pop icon had died April 21, '16, 9:53 a.m. – I was sitting down to watch an early screening of Captain America: Civil War on the Disney Studios lot in Burbank, California. I received a text inquiring if I'd heard the news. As a number of noted critics and studio types filed in – all immersed in their devices, we confirmed the news for each other – Prince was dead. One noted critic, whose name I will not mention because she may not want you to know she cusses like a sailor, posed the question aloud, “How the fuck are we supposed to pay attention to this now!?” It was a goddamn good question. I said in response, voice cracking, “No shit, I'm all fucked up! »

- Tim Cogshell

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