IMDb > Nosferatu (1922)
Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Nosferatu (1922) More at IMDbPro »Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (original title)

Photos (See all 44 | slideshow) Videos (see all 4)
Nosferatu -- NOSFERATU.  A chronicle of the Great Death in Wisborg.  The story of Nosferatu is one of gothic horror, sensuality and ultimately, death. Unlike Bram Stokers Dracula, the events in the movie take place, not in London, but in Bremen, Germany during the 183

Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   57,230 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Henrik Galeen (screen play)
Bram Stoker (based on the novel: "Dracula")
Contact:
View company contact information for Nosferatu on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
3 June 1929 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Vampire Count Orlok expresses interest in a new residence and real estate agent Hutter's wife. Silent classic based on the story "Dracula." Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
One of the great celebrations/critiques of cinema. See more (325 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Max Schreck ... Graf Orlok
Gustav von Wangenheim ... Hutter (as Gustav v. Wangenheim)
Greta Schröder ... Ellen, seine Frau (as Greta Schroeder)
Georg H. Schnell ... Harding, ein Reeder (as G.H. Schnell)
Ruth Landshoff ... Ruth, seine Schwester
Gustav Botz ... Professor Sievers, der Stadtarzt
Alexander Granach ... Knock, ein Häusermakler
John Gottowt ... Professor Bulwer, ein Paracelsianer
Max Nemetz ... Ein Kapitän
Wolfgang Heinz ... 1. Matrose
Albert Venohr ... 2. Matrose
Eric van Viele ... Matrose 2
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Karl Etlinger ... Kontrolleur am Kai (uncredited)
Guido Herzfeld ... Wirt (uncredited)
Loni Nest ... Child at Window (uncredited)
Fanny Schreck ... Krankenschwester im Hospital (uncredited)
Hardy von Francois ... Arzt im Hospital (uncredited)
Heinrich Witte ... Wärter im Irrenhaus (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
F.W. Murnau 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Henrik Galeen  screen play
Bram Stoker  based on the novel: "Dracula"

Produced by
Enrico Dieckmann .... producer
Albin Grau .... producer
 
Original Music by
James Bernard (1997)
Hans Erdmann 
Carlos U. Garza (1998)
Gérard Hourbette 
Timothy Howard (1991)
Richard Marriott (1989) (as Club Foot Orchestra)
Richard O'Meara (2000)
Hans Posegga (1989)
Peter Schirmann (1969)
Douglas Sosin 
Bernardo Uzeda (2006)
Bernd Wilden (1998)
Thierry Zaboitzeff 
 
Cinematography by
Fritz Arno Wagner (photographed by) (as F.A. Wagner)
Günther Krampf (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Albin Grau (costumes by)
 
Art Department
Albin Grau .... art director: sets
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Fritz Arno Wagner .... camera operator
 
Music Department
James Fitzpatrick .... music contractor (1997)
Joanna Seaton .... vocalist (2002)
Art Zoyd .... performer (1988)
 
Other crew
Robert Gray .... translator: English intertitles
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens" - Germany (original title)
"Nosferatu, a Symphony of Horror" - International (English title) (complete title), USA (complete title)
See more »
Runtime:
94 min | USA:81 min | Spain:65 min (VHS version) | Spain:92 min (DVD edition) | 84 min (1994 restored version projected at 20 fps) | UK:88 min (1997 restored version) | Belgium:85 min | Sweden:84 min (DVD version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Brazil:12 | Canada:PG (Manitoba/Nova Scotia) (DVD rating) (video rating) | Canada:13+ (Ontario) | Canada:G (Quebec) | Czech Republic:U | Finland:K-12 (1987) | Finland:(Banned) (1922) | Germany:12 | Iceland:L | Netherlands:18 (1931) | New Zealand:M | Portugal:M/12 (DVD rating) | Singapore:PG | South Korea:12 (DVD rating) | Spain:13 | Spain:T | Sweden:(Banned) | UK:PG | USA:Unrated | USA:TV-PG (cable rating)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The movie was banned in Sweden due to excessive horror. The ban was finally lifted in 1972See more »
Goofs:
Crew or equipment visible: When Hutter is going to bed in his room at the inn, a waving arm of a crew member (holding some piece of cloth) can be seen at the far right corner.See more »
Quotes:
Graf Orlok:Is this your wife? What a lovely throat.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Empire of the Censors (1995) (TV)See more »

FAQ

Can I watch this film online?
How many different versions exist of Nosferatu?
See more »
75 out of 116 people found the following review useful.
One of the great celebrations/critiques of cinema., 22 March 2001
Author: Alice Liddel (-darragh@excite.com) from dublin, ireland

'Nosferatu' opens with a man looking at his reflection in a mirror. Besides its symbolic significance, this is a perfect distillation of his character, that of a vain, narcissistic, absurdly self-confident to the point of machismo, married man largely indifferent to a wife he abruptly leaves to make the fortune worthy of a man of his merits. He ain't afraid of no ghosts, nor robbers. So, the image he sees in that mirror is one of wholeness, perfection - I am Hutter, I command all I see, my unity of identity is linked to my power in body.

To the viewer, however, the effect is the precise opposite. The framing of the scene is fragmented, with the outer frame, the window and the mirror; Hutter himself is doubled - the 'real' Hutter and his reflection, or shadow. All the assumptions smilingly embodied in Hutter will thus be destroyed in conventional horror terms.

His whole identity will be destroyed - the Count will suck his blood and in effect become him, if we believe the man who claims 'blood is life'. Hutter's body will first become passive, feminised as he is violated by the Count; after, he will no longer be a body, but a shadow, bloodless - literally, he shadows the Count as the latter comes to England; and symbolically, in that two men now claim possession of Hutter's wife, and both have equal claim, both being Hutter.

Murnau is careful to give his horror story a genuine patina as an 'objective' story: no horror film has come as close to capturing the visual essence of all those stories that have circulated in Europe for centuries, the twisting medieval towns, the arcane religious symbolism, the plagues and mass hysteria, the crumbling castles and storm-tossed ships, the creak of wood - the look of the film feels like a crumpling manuscript setting out the story.

But the film is also the portrait of a marriage. The opening sequence chillingly reveals the sterility of a marriage before anyone has even heard of the Count - Hutter wrapped up in himself; Ellen, hypersensitive, morbid, dressed as if in mourning; the union childless; the couple, above all, separate, each completely misunderstanding the other.

The image of the mirror is repeated throughout the film, connecting Hutter to the Count - the scene in Knock's office where Hutter looks at the map of Transylvania just as he did his mirror; the Count's house directly opposite Hutter's, a decaying edifice that looks like a melting, anguished face.

But Ellen is linked to the Count too, her somnolent rising mirroring his. This isn't a conventional opposition between bourgeois and bestial urges, even though the Count is given the most grotesque (anti-Semitic?) animal features, and even though Murnau never lets us forget the Conut as emanation of the Hutters' dreams, desires and fears - Hutter reads that he will shadow his dreams; Ellen spends most of the film sleepwalking.

All three elements of this triangle, which symbolises the one relationship, is linked to death - the Count, the undead, living in coffins of dead earth; Hutter, narcissistic, onanistic, his lifeblood siphoned from him; Ellen, the Venus fly-trap, self-abnegating destroyer of the destroying force. Hutter ends the film as he began, alone, his lust for money and status destroying the union that crowned it. The contrivance of society and respectability is swept away by the malaise of nature, those gendered forests, tides and moons, as if the Count and Ellen are part of the one female nature Hutter cannot accomodate.

Such Freudiana is undermined in the film in two ways - in the disarming comedy of the piece, the Count often seeming to have strayed from a silent comedy, running around London with his coffin; and by a self-reflexive examination of film, that sees the warning about vampires in the book Hutter reads linked to bestiality and the eye that is so important in the film; the turning of the film stock into negative as Hutter enters the Count's realm; the trickery, such as time lapse and fast motion, that shows the Count's mastery of time and space, but, more importantly, Murnau's mastery over the storytelling, already indicated by an unseen, but constantly intruding narrator; even Ellen's couch, which, my husband suggests , seems patterned as strips of film. In a movie where human sexuality is impossible, the characters seem content to be voyeurs, like the film audience, staving off the death, the loss of identity, or at least its fragmentation, that contact with another person entails.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (325 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Nosferatu (1922)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Annoyed by overacting and many flaws. Da_wizzZ
Why is this movie considered a classic? andrehansenherrested
What version to watch?! mnlarned
Scores wan_computers123
Gustav von Wangenheim Holy_Water
Why didn't anybody fight Orlok? sponge_101
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Nosferatu the Vampyre Dracula Horror of Dracula Dracula Drácula
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Horror section IMDb Germany section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.