Aquarius (1970) - News Poster

(1970–1977)

News

Variety Critics Weigh in on the Year in Film

  • Variety - Film News
Variety Critics Weigh in on the Year in Film
Were you thrilled or disappointed in the films this year? In an effort to sum up the themes of the last 12 months of cinema, we posed three questions to a panel of Variety critics and pundits.

1. How do you rate the 2016 slate against those of previous years?

2. What was the biggest scandal or most-talked-about issue of the year?

3. What aspect of film this year made you stand up and cheer?

Not surprising, there was wild variation among their answers. There were highs (“Moonlight”) and lows (the Nate Parker fiasco). Also not surprising: Politics were a big part of the conversation. Here’s how our panel weighed in.

Andrew Barker

Senior features writer

1. On the whole, 2016 had more than its share of disappointments: unusually soul-crushing sequels, middling attempted Oscar-bait, and some head-scratching misfires from typically reliable directors.

But any year in which moviegoers are treated to a genuine masterpiece from artists
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jared Mobarak’s Top 10 Films of 2016

Dare I say 2016 feels like a throwback to the stellar work of great auteurs doing their thing in the ’70s without fear of never working in the industry again? We have the science fiction, horror, and western genres all finding their way into awards conversation, and the best dramas have proven themselves to be both timeless in emotion and wholly contemporary when contextualized against our world’s state of political flux. Cinema has not only found a way to resonate in an inclusive manner; it’s also transcended surface appearances to start conversations we desperately need.

To my mind, there are six four-star films on this list, along with more than a few that could easily add a half-star to equal them. My inability to include La La Land, American Honey, and Captain Fantastic only proves that talk of 2016 being sub-par is completely unfounded. Once I catch-up to some foreign favorites (e.
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Macbeth' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

Macbeth was the first film Roman Polanski made following the murder of his wife, Sharon Tate, and friends at the hands of the Manson family. At the time he'd been working on the sci-fi thriller The Day of the Dolphin, which would later be made by Mike Nichols. It was during a skiing trip arranged by Victor Lownes, a subsequent producer of the film, Polanski made the decision Macbeth would be his next film. It was a decision he made feeling his next film "should be something serious, not a comedy... something with some depth." Polanski would team with Kenneth Tynan to write the screenplay and, thanks to urging from Lownes, Hugh Hefner and Playboy would eventually serve as the film's producer after no one else would touch it. As Polanski notes in an included 60-minute documentary on this new Criterion Blu-ray release, to that point there had only been
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

‘Californication’ Finale: David Duchovny Says Goodbye to Hank Moody

‘Californication’ Finale: David Duchovny Says Goodbye to Hank Moody
Warning: “Californication” fans who have not watched the series finale should stop reading. This interview with star David Duchovny contains spoilers about that episode.

After seven seasons of charting the booze-soaked escapades of writer-cum-lothario Hank Moody (David Duchovny in a role he was born to play), Showtime’s Emmy Award-winning series “Californication” comes to its fruitful end, awash in the sunny promises of happily-ever-after and the power of the epistolary proclamation of love.

Hank and Karen are back together. Again. At least for now.

Surrounded by passengers on a plane bound for New York, as it readies for take-off, Hank declares his undying love for the beautiful and neurotic Karen (Natascha McElhone), his heart, his soul mate, the woman with whom he’s been enmeshed in an oft-maddening dance of ‘Will they? /Won’t they?’ since episode one.

Our time in the sun has been a thing of absolute fucking beauty,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Exclusive: David Oman Talks Real Life Haunting and House at the End of the Drive

Inspired by true events that shocked the world and to this day still frighten and fascinate, The House at the End of the Drive was shot on location on Cielo Drive… just a knife’s throw away from the site of the Manson/Tate murders.

Produced by the homeowner David Oman, the movie blends fact with fiction as supernatural forces from the past transport he and his dinner guests through time -- back to the night of the original murders.

The movie recently enjoyed a big red carpet gala premiere in Hollywood at Shockfest (where it took home “Best Writer” honors in the closing Awards). We were lucky enough to catch up with Oman for this exclusive interview.

Dread Central: I’ve been hearing about your haunted house for years, but I never did have the, er, pleasure of visiting. I recall, a few years back, you used to host film screenings and tours.
See full article at Dread Central »

Top 10 movie adaptations

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top 10 movie adaptations

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Greatest Horror Movies Ever Made: Part 6: Best (Italian) Giallo Films

The term “giallo” initially referred to cheap yellow paperbacks (printed American mysteries from writers such as Agatha Christie), that were distributed in post-fascist Italy. Applied to cinema, the genre is comprised of equal parts early pulp thrillers, mystery novels, with a willingness to gleefully explore onscreen sex and violence in provocative, innovative ways. Giallos are strikingly different from American crime films: they value style and plot over characterization, and tend towards unapologetic displays of violence, sexual content, and taboo exploration. The genre is known for stylistic excess, characterized by unnatural yet intriguing lighting techniques, convoluted plots, red herrings, extended murder sequences, excessive bloodletting, stylish camerawork and unusual musical arrangements. Amidst the ‘creative kill’ set-pieces are thematic undercurrents along with a whodunit element, usually some sort of twist ending. Here is my list of the best giallo films – made strictly by Italian directors, so don’t expect Black Swan, Amer or
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Happy Birthday Joseph Fiennes! Today, May 27, You’re 41 Years Old!

Getty Images

We recently saw you in the Starz! series Camelot, but no one will forget your William Shakespeare portrayal.

Joseph Fiennes is an English born actor you probably know from Shakespeare in Love. He’s married to model María Dolores Diéguez, and last March they welcomed their first child, a baby girl. Get all the details at Astrology.com!

Happy birthday, Joseph Fiennes! An actor’s actor right down to your immensely imaginative Pisces Moon, you’ve famously turned down big picture deals — even after your huge commercial success as the title character in ‘Shakespeare in Love.’ A lover of theater and screen roles that pass through your selective filter, this year may offer you the pick of the litter as the cosmos magnify your artistic aspirations and promise surreal opportunities!

Powered by Astrology.com For your daily love, career, beauty, food, & dogscopes click on your sign! Aquarius

January
See full article at HollywoodLife »

Theater Feature: Casts of ‘Hair,’ ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ Benefit Marriage Equality

Chicago – The casts of two current theater spectaculars in Chicago lent their talents to benefit Marriage Equality in the United States. The “Be-In for Marriage Equality” took place on March 14, 2011, and featured performers from the road show Broadway version of “Hair” and the current cast of “Million Dollar Quartet.”

The event, which was produced by Alissa Norby of HollywoodChicago.com through her Jabberwock Productions, took place at Sidetracks nightclub in Chicago and accentuated the vocal talents in both companies. With original songs and cover versions, it was a talented parade of a true musical experience. The show benefited “Broadway Impact,” an advocacy group lobbying for marriage equality and other issues.

Highlights included a version of Paul Simon’s “America” and an original song from Gabe Bowling, who plays Carl Perkins in Million Dollar Quartet. Both casts finished together with the show stopper from Hair called “The Flesh Failures/Let the Sunshine In.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

See also

External Sites