7.2/10
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Sunshine (2007)

Trailer
1:56 | Trailer
A team of international astronauts are sent on a dangerous mission to reignite the dying Sun with a nuclear fission bomb in 2057.

Director:

Danny Boyle

Writer:

Alex Garland
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Popularity
1,444 ( 83)
1 win & 20 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Cliff Curtis ... Searle
Chipo Chung ... Icarus (voice)
Cillian Murphy ... Robert Capa
Michelle Yeoh ... Corazon
Hiroyuki Sanada ... Kaneda
Rose Byrne ... Cassie
Benedict Wong ... Trey
Chris Evans ... Mace
Troy Garity ... Harvey
Mark Strong ... Pinbacker
Paloma Baeza ... Capa's Sister
Archie Macdonald Archie Macdonald ... Child
Sylvie Macdonald Sylvie Macdonald ... Child
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Storyline

50 years into the future, the Sun begins to die, and Earth is dying as a result. A team of astronauts is sent to revive the Sun - but the mission fails. Seven years later, a new team is sent to finish the mission as mankind's last hope. Written by harpster_2004@yahoo.co.uk

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Dark days are coming. See more »

Genres:

Sci-Fi | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violent content and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Prof. Brian Cox, CERN / Manchester University, acted as the film's science advisor. His wife was involved in production of the movie's blog. See more »

Goofs

(at around 29 mins) As the crew attempts to rotate the shield to repair it, there is an argument that they would lose com towers 3 and 4, which they say would need on the way home. However, many shots including the simulation of payload delivery reveal that the Icarus' small shield which is supposed to protect Icarus after the payload is detached, just isn't wide enough to protect those towers at all, so they would've lost them anyway. It is even questionable, whether this shield would be capable of protecting the Icarus itself after detaching the payload with the large shield and at that close distance from the sun. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Capa: Our sun is dying. Mankind faces extinction. Seven years ago the Icarus project sent a mission to restart the sun but that mission was lost before it reached the star. Sixteen months ago, I, Robert Capa, and a crew of seven left earth frozen in a solar winter. Our payload a stellar bomb with a mass equivalent to Manhattan Island. Our purpose to create a star within a star.
[long pause]
Capa: Eight astronauts strapped to the back of a bomb. My bomb. Welcome to the Icarus Two.
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Crazy Credits

At the end of the credits the sound of the distress beacon of the Icarus can be heard in the background. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Worst Movie Endings (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Peggy Sussed
Performed by Underworld
Written by Karl Hyde & Rick Smith
Published by Sherlock Holmes Music Publishing Ltd. / Chysalis Music Group USA
Licensed courtesy of Smith & Hyde Productions t/a Underworldlive.com
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User Reviews

 
To say there is nothing new under the sun is usually apt in sunny Hollywood, but not this time
22 April 2007 | by Flagrant-BaronessaSee all my reviews

With a suitably international and diverse cast to simulate the equivalent crew onboard the Icarus II ("Icarus I" didn't fare so well), director Danny Boyle fledges a science fiction that gains momentum at its very first image – and does not halt until the end credits roll. To be perfectly frank, this is one of the most unbearably exciting films for whose entire duration I have ever squirmed in my seat for at the theatre.

On a mission to re-ignite the sun by detonating a bomb ("the size of Manhattan island", Cillian Murphy's physicist nods to American audiences and cause me to suffer horrible flashbacks to Armaggeddon's "it's the size of Texas" assessment) human lives are expendable and rationalized by rank. There are scientists, astronauts and various specialists on Icarus II who are all poised on the brink of sacrificing themselves for the greater good of mankind. Diverse in the sense that there are both men and women, and few characters are 'black or white' (morally, and physically), it does puzzle me that New Zealanders, Aussies and Irishmen have been arbitrarily converted into Americans. The crew is nevertheless highly impressive and professional, with a few minor exceptions for plot-propelling purposes, like when someone does something very stupid.

There is noticeably a tremendous visual sense throughout "Sunshine" with a screen that is awash with sparkling explosions and each frame saturated with bright colours and dimmed contrasts. There is no genre-transcending perhaps, and most probably its visuals are under the mercy of dating effects, but for now this is truly the crème de la crème of science fiction, take my word for it. Even the cinematography within the spaceship alleys and chambers is compelling and sweeps through Icarus II with great tracking shots. Amongst other films, Danny Boyle was inspired by Das Boot and certainly there are traces of the same claustrophobia underpinning the setting, but ultimately he opted for a more habitable environment to make it believable (like humanity would ship off its only hope with a crummy, crowded old vessel).

To justify the occasional bouts of sci-fi clichés, I'd like to firstly point out that it's not like "Sunshine" traffics in stereotypes or resorts to formulaic elements, and secondly that I believe certain clichés have evolved for a reason – they quite clearly stand the test of time. There are within science fiction some staples that are simply necessary to define its genre, such as the dutiful human sacrifices to up the drama, the internal mutinies to instill the uncertainty in the operation, the nightmarish conditions onboard the ship to suck you in, the technical jargon of velocities and shield angles that spits like bullet-fire to give the film a firm scientific footing, and finally the epic music to elevate suspense. "Sunshine" incorporates and melts together all of the aforementioned, but in militantly non-formulaic ways that only add to the experience. As a potent example, there isn't just pedestrian classical tunes recycled from 2001 and filtered through {insert rote Hollywood composer here}'s score – it is puffed full of beautiful piano crescendos that are almost incongruous to the sci-fi vibe, and the cumulative effect is wonderful.

"Sunshine" is sporadically blemished by minor faults, such as when Murphy's Law is being followed a bit too rigorously to up the excitement. Luckily, all of this is washed away or camouflaged when Boyle serves up his next goosebumps-inducing, gasp-eliciting spectacle – be it a horror twist or an impossibly epic action stunt. On the topic of the former, and clearly the chiasma at which "Alien" comparisons have been drawn, there is a magnificently creepy horror/mystery vibe interlacing the story in space. On top of this, Danny Boyle also dabbles in existentialism (a little too much if you ask me), making this into one of the most ambitious sci-fi turns ever made. In this way, maybe "Sunshine" is not primed to collect awards or even serve as meat for mainstream Hollywood, but I think it's safe to crown it the "Alien" of the 21st century.

8 out of 10


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 July 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Sunshine See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP26,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$242,964, 22 July 2007

Gross USA:

$3,675,753

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$34,806,812
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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