IMDb > Rosemary's Baby (1968)
Rosemary's Baby
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Rosemary's Baby (1968) More at IMDbPro »

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Rosemary's Baby -- Trailer for Rosemary's Baby

Overview

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8.0/10   124,522 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Ira Levin (novel)
Roman Polanski (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Rosemary's Baby on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
12 June 1968 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Pray for Rosemary's Baby
Plot:
A young couple move into a new apartment, only to be surrounded by peculiar neighbors and occurrences. When the wife becomes mysteriously pregnant, paranoia over the safety of her unborn child begins controlling her life. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 12 wins & 9 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
"Awful things happen in every apartment house" See more (415 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Mia Farrow ... Rosemary Woodhouse

John Cassavetes ... Guy Woodhouse

Ruth Gordon ... Minnie Castevet

Sidney Blackmer ... Roman Castevet

Maurice Evans ... Hutch

Ralph Bellamy ... Dr. Sapirstein

Victoria Vetri ... Terry (as Angela Dorian)

Patsy Kelly ... Laura-Louise

Elisha Cook Jr. ... Mr. Nicklas (as Elisha Cook)

Emmaline Henry ... Elise Dunstan

Charles Grodin ... Dr. Hill
Hanna Landy ... Grace Cardiff

Phil Leeds ... Dr. Shand (as Philip Leeds)
D'Urville Martin ... Diego

Hope Summers ... Mrs. Gilmore

Marianne Gordon ... Rosemary's Girl Friend

Wende Wagner ... Rosemary's Girl Friend (as Wendy Wagner)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Toby Adler ... Lady on Yacht (uncredited)
Bill Baldwin ... Salesman (uncredited)
Walter Baldwin ... Mr. Wees (uncredited)
Roy Barcroft ... Sun-Browned Man (uncredited)
Charlotte Boerner ... Mrs. Fountain (uncredited)
Gail Bonney ... Babysitter (voice) (uncredited)
Yvonne Bouvier ... Woman in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Carol Brewster ... Claudia Comfort (uncredited)
Lynn Brinker ... Sister Veronica (uncredited)
Sebastian Brook ... Argyron Stavropoulos (uncredited)

William Castle ... Man by Pay Phone (uncredited)
Florence Clayton ... Woman in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Gordon Connell ... Allen Stone - Guy's Agent (uncredited)
Patricia Ann Conway ... Mrs. John F. Kennedy (uncredited)
Pearl S. Cooper ... Woman in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Roger Creed ... Mason (uncredited)
Jane Crowley ... Woman in Dream Sequence (uncredited)

Tony Curtis ... Donald Baumgart (voice) (uncredited)
Joyce Davis ... Dee Bertillon (uncredited)
Paul Denton ... Skipper (uncredited)
Charles Drubin ... Man in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Duke Fishman ... Man (uncredited)
Janet Garland ... Nurse (uncredited)
Michel Gomez ... Pedro (uncredited)
William Graeff Jr. ... Man in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Ann Graeff ... Woman in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
John Halloran ... Mechanic (uncredited)
Ernest Harada ... Young Japanese Man (uncredited)
Marilyn Harvey ... Dr. Sapirstein's Receptionist (uncredited)
Jean Inness ... Sister Agnes (uncredited)
Al Jepson ... Man in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Ray Johnson ... Man in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Irene Kelly ... Woman at Party (uncredited)
Jack Knight ... Investigating patrolman (uncredited)
Mona Knox ... Mrs. Byron (uncredited)
Michael Larrain ... Ted Wendell (uncredited)
Louise Lawson ... Portia Haynes (uncredited)
Craig Littler ... Jimmy (uncredited)
Kenneth Luber ... Man at Party (uncredited)
Lorna Luce ... Woman at Party (uncredited)
Donna Mantoan ... Woman at Party (uncredited)
Natalie Masters ... Young Woman (uncredited)
Elmer Modling ... Young Man (uncredited)
Floyd Mutrux ... Man at Party (uncredited)
Geoffrey Norman ... Mike (uncredited)

Patricia O'Neal ... Mrs. Wees (uncredited)
Robert Osterloh ... Mr. Fountain (uncredited)
Josh Peine ... Man at Party (uncredited)
Gale Peters ... Rain Morgan (uncredited)
Benito Prezia ... Renato (uncredited)
Jack Ramage ... Patron (uncredited)
Joan T. Reilly ... Pregnant Woman (uncredited)

George R. Robertson ... Lou Comfort (uncredited)
William Roderick ... Scott (uncredited)
George Savalas ... Workman (uncredited)
Almira Sessions ... Mrs. Sabatini (uncredited)
Naga Seversen ... Woman at Party (uncredited)
Michael Shillo ... Pope (uncredited)
Bruno Sidar ... Mr. Gilmore (uncredited)
Tom Signorelli ... Man at the Party (uncredited)
Michael Stark ... Man at Party (uncredited)
Cathy Steele ... Lady on Yacht (uncredited)
Al Szathmary ... Taxi Driver (uncredited)
Clay Tanner ... Devil (uncredited)
Viki Vigen ... Lisa (uncredited)
Eleanore Vogel ... Woman in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Max Wagner ... Man in Dream Sequence (uncredited)
Robert Whaley ... Uncle Mike (uncredited)
Frank White ... Hugh Dunstan (uncredited)
Adele Wynn ... Carole Wendell (uncredited)

Directed by
Roman Polanski 
 
Writing credits
Ira Levin (novel)

Roman Polanski (screenplay)

Produced by
William Castle .... producer
Dona Holloway .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Krzysztof Komeda  (as Christopher Komeda)
 
Cinematography by
William A. Fraker (director of photography) (as William Fraker)
 
Film Editing by
Sam O'Steen 
Bob Wyman 
 
Production Design by
Richard Sylbert 
 
Art Direction by
Joel Schiller 
 
Set Decoration by
Robert Nelson 
 
Costume Design by
Anthea Sylbert 
 
Makeup Department
Sydney Guilaroff .... hair styles creator: Miss Farrow
Vidal Sassoon .... hair styles creator: Miss Farrow
Allan Snyder .... makeup artist
Sherry Wilson .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
William Davidson .... unit production manager (as William C. Davidson)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Daniel McCauley .... assistant director (as Daniel J. McCauley)
Gene Marum .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Paolo Rocco Innamorato .... first assistant art director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Harold Lewis .... sound recordist
 
Visual Effects by
Farciot Edouart .... process photography
 
Stunts
Roger Creed .... stunts (uncredited)
Frank Orsatti .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Steve Birtles .... lighting technician (uncredited)
Michael P. Joyce .... camera operator (uncredited)
Robert Willoughby .... special still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Bain .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Hawk Koch .... dialogue coach (as Howard W. Koch Jr.)
Luanna S. Poole .... script continuity
Robert Evans .... developer (uncredited)
Wayne Fitzgerald .... title designer (uncredited)
Stephen Frankfurt .... title designer (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
136 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:M | Brazil:14 | Canada:18A | Canada:18+ (Quebec) | Finland:K-16 | France:U | Germany:16 (DVD rating) | India:A | Ireland:18 | Italy:VM14 | Netherlands:16 | Norway:16 (original rating) | Norway:15 (re-rating) | Portugal:M/16 | Singapore:M18 | South Korea:18 | Spain:18 (DVD rating) | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:18 (tv rating) | UK:18 (video rating) (1987) (2001) | USA:R | USA:Approved (MPAA rating: certificate #21674) (Suggested for Mature Audiences) | USA:R (re-rating) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Before the filming of the scene of Rosemary calling Donald Baumgart (the actor in the story who mysteriously goes blind), Mia Farrow did not know who would be speaking the lines. It was Tony Curtis, and in the scene Farrow shows slight confusion, finding the voice familiar but not able to place it. This confusion was exactly the effect director Roman Polanski hoped to capture by having Curtis read the lines.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Obvious wig on Rosemary during the rape.See more »
Quotes:
[First lines]
Guy Woodhouse:Are you a doctor?
Guy Woodhouse:Yes. Yes.
Rosemary Woodhouse:He's an actor.
Mr. Nicklas:Oh,an actor. We're very popular with actors. Have I, uh, seen you in anything?
Guy Woodhouse:Well,let's see, I-I did "Hamlet" a while back, didn't I, Liz? And then we did "The, uh, The Sandpiper" and then...
Rosemary Woodhouse:He's joking. He was in "Luther" and "Nobody Loves an Albatross" and a lot of television plays and commercials.
Mr. Nicklas:Well, that's where the money is, isn't it? Commercials.
Guy Woodhouse:And the artistic thrills, too!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Baby Rosemary (1976)See more »
Soundtrack:
LullabySee more »

FAQ

How can a struggling actor afford a huge apartment like that?
Was the film shot in chronological order?
Do supernatural events take place?
See more »
12 out of 15 people found the following review useful.
"Awful things happen in every apartment house", 26 November 2006
Author: Steffi_P from Ruritania

Rosemary's Baby was originally proposed as a project to Alfred Hitchcock. He turned it down, and instead it fell to the up-and-coming Polish director Roman Polanski. It's hard to imagine what the master of suspense would have made out of this tale of devil worship and Catholic guilt, even though there is some Hitchockian psychology and mystery at work. As it was however, it proved to be right up the young Polanski's street, taking his career to new heights, and spawning a run of occult horrors in the late 60s and early 70s, of which this is still one of the few greats.

Polanski had already established himself as a director most comfortable with the confinement of interiors in films like Repulsion (1965). Here he draws us right into the claustrophobic feel of the upstairs apartment, often placing the camera in a room adjacent to the action, with the characters viewed through a doorway. The camera movement is mostly restricted to pans. It rarely tracks or dollys, as if it were trapped in a corner. Even in the exterior scenes the sky is often sandwiched or blotted out altogether between the buildings rising on either side. The actors often appear uncomfortably close to the camera, but not in individual close-up shots. Instead, they come in that close as they move around the set and the camera pans back and forth. Not only does this add to the cramped, awkward atmosphere, but this constantly changing distancing of actors within a single shots makes the audience feel as if they are actually standing there.

Rosemary's Baby may come across as very slow to some viewers. 140 minutes certainly is a long time in the horror genre. There do also appear to be a lot of unnecessary details in the dialogue – we get to find out far more about Rosemary's background than is normal for a character in cinema. But for one thing, Polanski was not interested in making a shock-and-gore horror – Rosemary's Baby is all about the eerie atmosphere, the tension and the mystery. He holds our attention by regularly dropping in clues that something sinister is afoot. Furthermore, all the detail and depth has its significance in the finished product – like the references to Rosemary's Catholic upbringing or the background of the Castavets.

Polanski has never overused flashy techniques – no fast editing, zooms or unusual angles that make for a very obvious directorial style. But there is always great complexity and meaning in the look of things – the set design, lighting, costume and so on. One of my favourite touches is Mia Farrow's extremely short Vidal Sassoon hairdo that she has done halfway through the film. With her bony features and pale skin she more and more begins to resemble a skeleton, especially under the carefully placed lighting in the scene after the party when she realises the pain has gone. It's simple yet significant ideas like that which make Polanski one of the best directors of his era.

There's some great casting in this picture. Careful choice of character actors makes for some quirky supporting roles. Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes are perfect in the lead roles. The musical score – that haunting opening melody, or the atonal violin squeaks – all add to the atmosphere.

Rosemary's Baby is a real landmark in horror. It helped keep the genre alive by pushing the occult - something fairly taboo, and not fully explored in cinema since the days of silents - to the fore. Also the restrained atmospheric horror was doubtless influential, particularly on Kubrick when he came to make The Shining. It inspired a lot, but was rarely bettered.

Was the above review useful to you?
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Was Dr. Hill Also Part of the Coven? Guernicaman
Would love to know the backstory of Roman and Minnie SJMcGuire2
an unintentional funny ebonyruffles
Was this a sexist film? mlovito63
Why did Terry kill herself? majjija
The scariest thing about this film SJMcGuire2
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