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The Invisible Man ()


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A scientist finds a way of becoming invisible, but in doing so, he becomes murderously insane.

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Cast verified as complete

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Dr. Jack Griffin aka The Invisible Man
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Flora Cranley
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Dr. Arthur Kemp
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Dr. Cranley
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Jenny Hall
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Herbert Hall
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Chief of Police
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Constable Jaffers
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Chief Detective
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Inspector Bird
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Inspector Lane
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Millie
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Adair ...
Detective Thompson (uncredited)
Ted Billings ...
Villager Playing Darts (uncredited)
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Bicycle Owner (uncredited)
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Farmer (uncredited)
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Informer Suggesting Ink (uncredited)
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Villager (uncredited)
Jack Deery ...
Officer in Charge of Barn Capture (uncredited)
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Reporter (uncredited)
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Screaming Woman (uncredited)
Bobbie Hale ...
Townsman at Pub (uncredited)
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Constable (uncredited)
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Townswoman at Pub (uncredited)
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Woman (uncredited)
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Doctor (uncredited)
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Constable (uncredited)
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Newsboy (uncredited)
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Cop (uncredited)
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Constable (uncredited)
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Party Guest (uncredited)
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Detective Hogan (uncredited)
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Official (uncredited)
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Old Farmer with Barn (uncredited)
Kathryn Sheldon ...
Orphanage Worker (uncredited)
Emma Tansey ...
Old Woman Listening to Radio (uncredited)
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Hospital Doctor (uncredited)
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2nd Man Calling Police ('Frost') (uncredited)
Bert Young ...
Railroad Switchman (uncredited)

Directed by

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James Whale

Written by

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H.G. Wells ... (novel)
 
R.C. Sherriff ... (screenplay)
 
Preston Sturges ... (contributing writer) (uncredited)
 
Philip Wylie ... () (uncredited)

Produced by

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Carl Laemmle Jr. ... producer

Music by

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Heinz Roemheld ... (uncredited)

Cinematography by

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Arthur Edeson ... (camera)

Film Editing by

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Ted J. Kent ... film editor (as Ted Kent)

Editorial Department

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Greg Rodin ... 4K Digital Restoration: Universal Studios
Maurice Pivar ... editorial supervisor (uncredited)

Art Direction by

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Charles D. Hall

Makeup Department

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Jack P. Pierce ... makeup artist (uncredited)

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Joseph A. McDonough ... assistant director (uncredited)

Art Department

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Wally Kirkpatrick ... chief props (uncredited)

Sound Department

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William Hedgcock ... sound recording engineer (uncredited)
John Kemp ... assistant recording engineer (uncredited)
Gilbert Kurland ... sound supervisor (uncredited)

Visual Effects by

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John P. Fulton ... special effects
Cleo E. Baker ... miniatures (uncredited)
Bill Heckler ... photographic effects assistant (uncredited)
Roswell A. Hoffmann ... optical cinematography (uncredited)
John J. Mescall ... miniature photographer (uncredited)
Frank D. Williams ... visual effects supervisor (uncredited)

Camera and Electrical Department

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Peter Abriss ... chief grip (uncredited)
Jack Eagan ... assistant camera (uncredited)
Arthur Edeson ... camera operator (uncredited)
Roman Freulich ... still photographer (uncredited)
King D. Gray ... camera operator (uncredited)
John J. Mescall ... director of photography: additional photography (uncredited)
Fred Stoll ... grip (uncredited)

Music Department

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W. Franke Harling ... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Gilbert Kurland ... music supervisor (uncredited)
Heinz Roemheld ... conductor (uncredited)
William Schiller ... orchestrator (uncredited)

Additional Crew

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Carl Laemmle ... presenter / president: Universal Pictures Corp.
Crew verified as complete

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

A mysterious man, whose head is completely covered in bandages, wants a room. The proprietors of the pub aren't used to making their house an inn during the winter months, but the man insists. They soon come to regret their decision. The man quickly runs out of money, and he has a violent temper besides. Worse still, he seems to be some kind of chemist and has filled his room with messy chemicals, test tubes, beakers and the like. When they try to throw him out, they make a ghastly discovery. Meanwhile, Flora Cranley appeals to her father to do something about the mysterious disappearance of Dr. Griffin, his assistant and her sweetheart. Her father's other assistant, the cowardly Dr. Kemp, is no help. He wants her for himself. Little does Flora guess that the wild tales, from newspapers and radio broadcasts, of an invisible homicidal maniac are stories of Dr. Griffin himself, who has discovered the secret of invisibility and gone mad in the process. Written by J. Spurlin

Plot Keywords
Taglines Catch me if you can! See more »
Genres
Parents Guide View content advisory »
Certification

Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • L'Homme invisible (France)
  • Der Unsichtbare (Germany)
  • El hombre invisible (Spain)
  • Ο Αόρατος Ανθρωπος (Greece)
  • 透明人間(1933) (Japan, Japanese title)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 71 min
Official Sites
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Language
Color
Aspect Ratio
Sound Mix
Filming Locations

Box Office

Budget $328,033 (estimated)

Did You Know?

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Trivia The first time Claude Rains' daughter ever saw her father in a movie was in 1950, when he took her to a showing of 'The Invisible Man' in a small Pennsylvanian theater. While the film was playing, Rains was telling his daughter all about how it was made. The other theater patrons stopped watching the movie and instead listened to Rains' anecdotes. See more »
Goofs Though the music at the pub comes from a coin-operated player piano, it, along with everyone talking in the pub, stops short at the startling arrival of the Invisible Man. See more »
Movie Connections Featured in Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror (1942). See more »
Soundtracks La Rosita See more »
Crazy Credits The opening credits appear out of thin air. See more »
Quotes The Invisible Man: We'll begin with a reign of terror, a few murders here and there, murders of great men, murders of little men - well, just to show we make no distinction. I might even wreck a train or two... just these fingers around a signalman's throat, that's all.
See more »

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