7.8/10
19,779
167 user 83 critic

A Place in the Sun (1951)

Trailer
2:35 | Trailer
A poor boy gets a job working for his rich uncle and ends up falling in love with two women.

Director:

George Stevens

Writers:

Theodore Dreiser (novel), Patrick Kearney (play) | 2 more credits »
Won 6 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Montgomery Clift ... George Eastman
Elizabeth Taylor ... Angela Vickers
Shelley Winters ... Alice Tripp
Anne Revere ... Hannah Eastman
Keefe Brasselle ... Earl Eastman
Fred Clark ... Bellows
Raymond Burr ... Dist. Atty. R. Frank Marlowe
Herbert Heyes ... Charles Eastman
Shepperd Strudwick ... Anthony Vickers
Frieda Inescort ... Mrs. Ann Vickers
Kathryn Givney ... Louise Eastman
Walter Sande ... Art Jansen - George's Attorney
Ted de Corsia ... Judge R.S. Oldendorff
John Ridgely ... Coroner
Lois Chartrand Lois Chartrand ... Marsha
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Storyline

The young and poor George Eastman (Montgomery Clift) leaves his religious mother and Chicago, Illinois and arrives in California expecting to find a better job in the business of his wealthy uncle Charles Eastman (Herbert Heyes). His cousin Earl Eastman (Keefe Brasselle) advises him that there are many women in the factory and the basic rule is that he must not hang around with any of them. George meets the worker of the assembly line, Alice Tripp (Shelley Winters), in the movie theater and they date. Meanwhile, the outcast George is promoted and he meets the gorgeous Angela Vickers (Dame Elizabeth Taylor) at a party thrown at his uncle's house. Angela introduces him to the local high society and they fall in love with each other. However, Alice is pregnant and she wants to get married to George. During a dinner party at Angela's lake house with parents, relatives, and friends, Alice calls George from the bus station and gives him thirty minutes to meet her; otherwise she will crash ... Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Young people asking so much of Life... taking so much of Love! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Final art director credit for Hans Drier. Beginning in 1918, he worked on over 540 movies and won three Oscars. See more »

Goofs

George is at the billiard table when miss Vickers enters the room. She wants to watch him play. George then aims at a colored ball close to the right cushion, when in a previous shot he cleared the table, leaving only the white ball at the top left corner. See more »

Quotes

Angela: Goodbye, George.
[half-turns away and then looks back]
Angela: Seems like we always spend the best part of our time just saying goodbye.
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Connections

Featured in TCM Guest Programmer: Maria Menounos (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Aloha Oe
(uncredited)
Written by Queen Liliuokalani
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User Reviews

 
When Social Worlds Collide
28 August 2006 | by LechuguillaSee all my reviews

Poor and uneducated George Eastman (Montgomery Clift) unwittingly sets a trap for himself when he takes an entry-level job at his rich uncle's factory, which has a prohibition on male employees dating female employees. He just can't resist one of the girls in his department, the pitiful and whiny Alice Tripp (wonderfully played by Shelley Winters). Eventually, George gets a promotion and is invited into the upper echelon of his uncle's social world, where he meets wealthy and beautiful Angela Vickers (a breathless Elizabeth Taylor). Naturally, he falls in love with Angela. But a complication with Alice leaves him unable to break off his relationship with her.

That's the setup for this George Stevens-directed film that plays rather like a modern Greek tragedy. Everything about "A Place In The Sun" is high quality: the production design, the lavish Edith Head costumes, the wonderful editing, and that great B&W cinematography with those marvelous close-up shots, and overlapping dissolves that cleverly advance the plot.

All three principal actors do a splendid job. And they get solid support from a top notch secondary cast that includes Raymond Burr and the interesting Anne Revere.

The story clearly plays up social class differences, with the haughty rich looking down their noses at common workers. The film's tone varies from romantic, to sad, to suspenseful. At mysterious Loon Lake where significant events occur, the cinematic atmosphere is heavy with anticipation. It's like something out of a Hitchcock thriller.

I've never cared much for sad love stories, and the film does seem a tad dated. Still, it's so well made it can be appreciated by most everyone but the terminally shallow. It has a powerful ending, one that accentuates the acting accomplishments of Clift and especially of Taylor. "A Place In The Sun" was nominated for nine academy awards, and winner of six. I'd say this is one time when Oscar voters got it right.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 November 1951 (Argentina) See more »

Also Known As:

An American Tragedy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,295,304 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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