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Don Juan ()


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In 16th Century Italy, devil-may-care playboy Don Juan runs afoul of the despotic Borgias.

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Cast verified as complete

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Donna Isobel
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Leandro
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Cesare Borgia
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Lucrezia Borgia
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Count Giano Donati (as Montague Love)
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Duke Della Varnese (as Joseph Swickard)
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Pedrillo
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Marchese Rinaldo
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Marchesia Rinaldo
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Mai - Lady in Waiting
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Adriana della Varnese
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Don Jose de Marana / Don Juan de Marana
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Duke Margoni (uncredited)
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Rena - Adriana's Maid (uncredited)
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Donna Elvira (uncredited)
Jacob Dance ...
Gentleman (uncredited)
Marion Morgan Dancers ...
Bacchanalian Revelers (uncredited)
Yvonne Day ...
Don Juan - at age 5 (uncredited)
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Don Juan - at age 10 (uncredited)
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The Dowager (uncredited)
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Hunchback (uncredited)
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Gentleman of Rome (uncredited)
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Imperia (uncredited)
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Gentleman of Rome (uncredited)
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Trusia (uncredited)
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Gentleman of Rome (uncredited)
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Neri - the Alchemist (uncredited)
Helen Lee Worthing ...
Eleanora (uncredited)

Directed by

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Alan Crosland

Written by

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Bess Meredyth ... (screen play)
 
Walter Anthony ... (titles) (uncredited)
 
Lord Byron ... (poem, 1821) (uncredited)
 
Maude Fulton ... (titles) (uncredited)

Music by

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William Axt ... (uncredited)
David Mendoza ... (uncredited)

Cinematography by

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Byron Haskin ... (uncredited)

Film Editing by

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Harold McCord ... (uncredited)

Art Direction by

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Ben Carré ... (uncredited)

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Gordon Hollingshead ... assistant director (uncredited)

Art Department

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Victor Vance ... art titles (uncredited)
A.C. Wilson ... master of properties (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Gerald W. Alexander ... sound (uncredited)
George Groves ... sound recording engineer (uncredited)

Special Effects by

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Harry Redmond Sr. ... special effects supervisor (uncredited)

Stunts

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Duke Green ... stunt double: John Barrymore (uncredited)

Camera and Electrical Department

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Frank Kesson ... assistant camera (uncredited)
Melbourne Spurr ... publicity photographer (uncredited)

Music Department

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William Axt ... music arranger (uncredited)
Maurice Baron ... orchestrator (uncredited)
Edward Bowes ... music arranger (uncredited)
Henry Hadley ... conductor (uncredited)
David Mendoza ... music arranger (uncredited)

Other crew

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Marion Morgan ... choreographer (uncredited)
F.N. Murphy ... electrical effects (uncredited)
Crew believed to be complete

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

If there was one thing that Don Juan de Marana learned from his father Don Jose, it was that women gave you three things - life, disillusionment and death. In his father's case it was his wife, Donna Isobel, and Donna Elvira who supplied the latter. Don Juan settled in Rome after attending the University of Pisa. Rome was run by the tyrannical Borgia family consisting of Caesar, Lucrezia and the Count Donati. Juan has his way with and was pursued by many women, but it is the one that he could not have that haunts him. It will be for her that he suffers the wrath of Borgia for ignoring Lucrezia and then killing Count Donati in a duel. For Adriana, they will both be condemned to death in the prison on the river Tigre. Written by Tony Fontana

Plot Keywords
Taglines The Scientific Marvel VITAPHONE Presentation FAMED OPERATIC AND MUSICAL ARTISTS...and JOHN BARRYMORE in "DON JUAN" (original poster) See more »
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Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • Don Juan - Der große Liebhaber (Germany)
  • Дон Жуан (Soviet Union, Russian title)
  • Don Juan si Lucrezia Borgia (Romania)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 110 min
Country
Language
Color
Aspect Ratio
Sound Mix

Box Office

Budget $546,000 (estimated)

Did You Know?

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Trivia Although this was the first feature film with a Vitaphone soundtrack (therefore being the first film with a completely synchronized soundtrack), it is by no means the first sound film. The first sound film can be dated back to 1895; the process was re-discovered and improved by a French company (using a gramophone) in 1910. In 1913 Thomas A. Edison announced that all the problems of sound films were solved, and showed what he called "the first sound film." As in the earlier efforts, Nursery Favorites (1913) had a gramophone that appeared to synchronize with the film. There was one problem: the film was projected at the wrong speed, and the soundtrack was slowed down inadvertently. This problem happened all too often, and a frustrated Edison abandoned his process. In 1921 D.W. Griffith employed various experts to film a sound introduction for his film Dream Street (1921), which still exists, and the performance went off without a hitch. Griffith soon stopped using sound because he thought it was financial suicide, stating, "Only 5% of the world speaks English, so why should I lose 95% of my audience?" However, by 1925 sound had arrived in the form of radio, and it was inevitable that film would follow. Movie studios tried various innovations to keep audiences coming (Technicolor, wide screen, etc.). Warner Brothers, then a lesser film company, bought the old Brooklyn-based Vitagraph Studios and its all-important network of 34 film exchanges (the film distribution network vital to each studio) in 1925 and laid out plans to become a dominant force in the film industry. Sam Warner, one of the four Warner brothers, felt the future was in sound and convinced his skeptical older brother Harry M. Warner (the money man) to throw their lot in with Western Electric's 16" disc-based recording system, forming the Vitaphone Corp. on April 20, 1926, as 70% stockholders. Oddly, Sam never envisioned the system for voice synchronization; rather, he saw it as an economical way to add the dimension of musical accompaniment. The Vitaphone process solved the synchronization problem electromechanically, corresponding the projection speed with the recorded disc by utilizing the same motor for both devices. While cumbersome in both recording (editing was impossible) and playback (discs were fragile), Vitaphone represented the peak of technological innovation, albeit briefly. This film, the first Warner Bros. feature to utilize the Vitaphone process, debuted in a gala premiere on August 6, 1926, and while it was a hit, it signaled an industry format war unrivaled until the 1980s Beta-vs.-VHS battle. Warner's The Jazz Singer (1927) would become a monster hit 13 months later, solidly proving the public's interest in sound. However, there were several sound systems then in development and none were interchangeable; the major studios like MGM and Paramount adopted a wait-and-see attitude that persisted well into 1929. The most practical, Fox's Movietone (sound on film) system, eventually won out and Warners abandoned recorded discs in 1930 but kept the Vitaphone trademark before the public well into the 1940s. See more »
Goofs This story is set during the reign of HH Alexander VI (1492-1503); however, it features very prominently the present day Basilica of Saint Peter, whose building started during the reign of HH Julius II (1503-1513), and which was not finished until the 17th century. See more »
Movie Connections Edited into Okay for Sound (1946). See more »
Quotes Don Juan de Marana: If her face matches her feet-God help us both!
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