IMDb > Young Frankenstein (1974)
Young Frankenstein
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Young Frankenstein (1974) More at IMDbPro »

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Young Frankenstein -- Dr. Frankenstein's grandson, after years of living down the family reputation, inherits granddad's castle and repeats the experiments.

Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   124,619 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 22% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Gene Wilder (screen story and screenplay) and
Mel Brooks (screen story and screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Young Frankenstein on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 December 1974 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Come Early... Get a Seat! See more »
Plot:
An American grandson of the infamous scientist, struggling to prove that he is not as insane as people believe, is invited to Transylvania, where he discovers the process that reanimates a dead body. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 12 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Probably the best comedy I've ever seen See more (338 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gene Wilder ... Dr. Frederick Frankenstein

Peter Boyle ... The Monster

Marty Feldman ... Igor

Madeline Kahn ... Elizabeth

Cloris Leachman ... Frau Blücher

Teri Garr ... Inga

Kenneth Mars ... Inspector Kemp

Richard Haydn ... Herr Falkstein
Liam Dunn ... Mr. Hilltop
Danny Goldman ... Medical Student

Oscar Beregi Jr. ... Sadistic Jailor (as Oscar Beregi)

Arthur Malet ... Village Elder
Richard Roth ... Insp. Kemp's Aide
Monte Landis ... Gravedigger
Rusty Blitz ... Gravedigger
Anne Beesley ... Little Girl

Gene Hackman ... Blindman
John Madison ... Villager

John Dennis ... Orderly in Frankenstein's Class
Rick Norman ... Villager
Rolfe Sedan ... Train Conductor
Terence Pushman ... Villager (as Terrence Pushman)
Randolph Dobbs ... Third Villager - Joe
Norbert Schiller ... Emcee at Frankenstein's Show
Pat O'Hara ... Villager (as Patrick O'Hara)

Michael Fox ... Helga's Father
Lidia Kristen ... Helga's Mother
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Ian Abercrombie ... Second Villager (uncredited)

Mel Brooks ... Werewolf / Cat Hit by Dart / Victor Frankenstein (voice) (uncredited)

Lou Cutell ... Frightened Villager (uncredited)
Peter Paul Eastman ... Theatre Goer (uncredited)
Lars Hensen ... Theatre Goer (uncredited)

Berry Kroeger ... First Village Elder (uncredited)
Johnny Marlin ... Spectator (uncredited)

Jeff Maxwell ... Medical Student (uncredited)

Leoda Richards ... Theatre Goer (uncredited)

Maida Severn ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Member of Angry Mob (uncredited)

Clement von Franckenstein ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Mel Brooks 
 
Writing credits
Gene Wilder (screen story and screenplay) and
Mel Brooks (screen story and screenplay)

Mary Shelley (based on characters in the novel "Frankenstein" by) (as Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley)

Produced by
Michael Gruskoff .... producer
 
Original Music by
John Morris 
 
Cinematography by
Gerald Hirschfeld (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
John C. Howard 
 
Casting by
Jane Feinberg (casting)
Mike Fenton (casting)
 
Production Design by
Dale Hennesy 
 
Set Decoration by
Robert De Vestel  (as Bob de Vestel)
 
Costume Design by
Dorothy Jeakins (costumes)
 
Makeup Department
Edwin Butterworth .... makeup artist (as Ed Butterworth)
Mary Keats .... hairdresser
William Tuttle .... makeup creator
 
Production Management
Frank Baur .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Marvin Miller .... assistant director
Barry Stern .... second assistant director
Michael Grillo .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Anthony Goldschmidt .... graphic design
Jack M. Marino .... property master (as Jack Marino)
Charles Sertin .... assistant property master
Hendrik Wynands .... construction coordinator (as Hank Wynands)
John Alvin .... poster artist (uncredited)
Edward T. McAvoy .... scenic artist (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Gene S. Cantamessa .... production mixer (as Gene Cantamessa)
Don Hall .... sound editor
Richard Portman .... production rerecording
 
Special Effects by
Henry Millar Jr. .... special effects
Hal Millar .... special effects
Gary L. King .... special effects technician (uncredited)
Jay King .... special effects technician (uncredited)
Robert W. King .... special effects assistant (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Matthew Yuricich .... matte artist (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Roger Creed .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Jesse Wayne .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jim Plannette .... gaffer (as James Plannette)
Steve Stafford .... assistant camera
Richard Tim Vanik .... camera operator (as Tim Vanik)
Eric D. Andersen .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Douglas Bolder .... best boy (uncredited)
John F. Ganther .... best boy (uncredited)
John Monte .... still photographer (uncredited)
Charles Record .... key grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Carolyn Ewart .... wardrobe: women's
Phyllis Garr .... wardrobe: women's
Dick James .... wardrobe: men's
Ed Wynigear .... wardrobe: men's
 
Editorial Department
Stanford C. Allen .... assistant editor
William D. Gordean .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
John Morris .... conductor
John Morris .... orchestrations
Jonathan Tunick .... orchestrations
John R. Harris .... music editor (uncredited)
Gerry Vinci .... musician: violin solo (uncredited)
Dan Wallin .... scoring mixer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Anthony Goldschmidt .... title design
Ray Quiroz .... script supervisor
John Campbell .... unit publicist (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Ken Strickfaden .... special thanks for original Frankenstein laboratory equipment (as Kenneth Strickfaden)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
106 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Australia:NRC (original rating) | Brazil:Livre | Canada:PG | Canada:G (Quebec) | Denmark:15 | Finland:K-16 | France:Tous publics | Greece:K-13 | Iceland:LH | Ireland:12A | Ireland:PG (original rating, 2000) | Ireland:12A (re-rating, 2017) | Italy:T | Netherlands:12 | New Zealand:PG | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | South Korea:15 | Spain:T | Sweden:15 | UK:12A (re-rating, 2017) | UK:PG (re-rating) (2000) | UK:15 (re-rating) (1987) | UK:AA (original rating) (1975) | USA:PG (MPAA rating: certificate #24007) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
One afternoon while shooting, Anne Bancroft (Mrs. Mel Brooks) visited the set and told Teri Garr that she and Mel had seen The Conversation (1974) the night before, which features Garr and Gene Hackman in the cast. Garr replied, "Oh, yeah, that turned out to be a pretty good movie." Bancroft responded, "Honey, *this* is a movie. The Conversation (1974) is a film."See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Helga lands on the bed, she is lying on the bed with no bed covers on her. When her parents enter her bedroom, she has bed covers over her.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein:If we look at the base of a brain, which has just been removed from the skull, there's very little of the mid-brain that we can actually see. Yet, as I demonstrated in my lecture last week, if the under aspects of the temporal lobes are gently pulled apart, the upper portion of the stem of the brain can be seen. The so-called "brain stem" consists of the mid-brain, a rounded protrusion called the pons, and a stalk tapering downwards called the medulla oblongata, which passes out of the skull through the foramen magnum, and becomes, of course, the spinal cord. Are there any questions before we proceed?
Medical Student:I have one question, Dr. Frankenstein.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein:That's "Fronkensteen".
Medical Student:I beg your pardon?
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein:My name; it's pronounced "Fronkensteen".
Medical Student:But aren't you the grandson of the famous Dr. Victor Frankenstein who went into graveyards, dug up freshly buried corpses, and transformed dead components into...?
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein:Yes! Yes, yes! We all know what he did; but I'd rather be remembered for my own small contributions to science, and not because of my accidental relationship... to a famous... cuckoo.
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein:[the medical students laugh] Now if you don't mind, can we get on with your question?
Medical Student:Well, sir, I'm not sure I understand the distinction between reflexive and voluntary nerve impulses.
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Bridal ChorusSee more »

FAQ

Is 'Young Frankenstein' based on a book?
What is 'Young Frankenstein' about?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
See more »
46 out of 61 people found the following review useful.
Probably the best comedy I've ever seen, 4 October 2005
Author: Max_cinefilo89 from Italy

If you love comedies, but haven't seen Young Frankenstein, you're in for a delicious treat.After three decades, it still makes people laugh to death, and it's a must-see for every spoof lover in the world.

Actually, it's not a parody, but a homage by Mel Brooks to James Whale's classic,shot in black and white on the same location and with the same props.

The "hero" is Dr.Frederick Frankenstein(Gene Wilder), who, after a long period in which he hated it, decides to repeat his grandfather's experiment.The result is the Transylvanians want to kill him, despite the fact that the monster is the most harmless creature in the world.

This sort of sequel to the original Frankenstein is hilarious from start to finish, mostly because of two actors:Peter Boyle and Martin Feldman.The former is great as the mute creature(he'll compensate that by talking too much in Everybody Loves Raymond), particularly in the scene with Gene Hackman's Blind Man.But it's Feldman's Igor that makes this film unmissable.No wonder, given he's got the best lines("Wait Master.It might be dangerous...you go first").

With no doubt Mel Brooks' masterpiece.

The Scary Movie franchise wishes it was this good.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (338 total) »

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