IMDb > WUSA (1970)
WUSA
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WUSA (1970) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
5.5/10   598 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Robert Stone (screenplay)
Robert Stone (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for WUSA on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
12 March 1971 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Love it or leave it See more »
Plot:
A radio station in the Deep South becomes the focal point of a right-wing conspiracy. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
1 win See more »
NewsDesk:
(9 articles)
Blu-ray Release: Rollerball (1975)
 (From Disc Dish. 18 April 2014, 3:22 PM, PDT)

Blu-ray Release: Wusa
 (From Disc Dish. 22 May 2013, 1:18 PM, PDT)

DVD Release: King: A Filmed Record…Montgomery to Memphis
 (From Disc Dish. 7 January 2013, 2:19 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
A case of potential untapped, but good to see something on this... See more (25 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Paul Newman ... Rheinhardt

Joanne Woodward ... Geraldine

Anthony Perkins ... Rainey

Laurence Harvey ... Farley

Pat Hingle ... Bingamon

Don Gordon ... Bogdanovich

Michael Anderson Jr. ... Marvin
Leigh French ... Girl

Bruce Cabot ... King Wolyoe

Cloris Leachman ... Philomene

Moses Gunn ... Clotho

Wayne Rogers ... Minter

Robert Quarry ... Noonan
Skip Young ... Rep. Jimmy Snipe
B.J. Mason ... Roosevelt Berry
Sahdji ... Hollywood
Geoff Edwards ... Irving - Disc Jockey
Hal Baylor ... Shorty

Clifton James ... Speed - Sailor in Bar
Tol Avery ... Senator
Paul Hampton ... Rusty Fargo
Jerry Catron ... Sidewinder Bates
Geraldine West ... First Matron (as Geraldine B. West)
Lucille Benson ... Second Matron
Susan Batson ... Teenage Girl

Zara Cully ... White Haired Woman
Preservation Hall Jazz Band (as The Preservation Hall Jazz Band of New Orleans)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kristin Andersen ... Playboy Bunny (uncredited)
Jeff Barr ... Man at Political Rally (uncredited)
Jim Boles ... Hot Dog Vendor (uncredited)
Paul Bradley ... (uncredited)

David Huddleston ... Heavy Man (uncredited)

Diane Ladd ... Barmaid at Railroad Station (uncredited)
Laird Stuart ... Bobby (uncredited)

Jesse Vint ... Young Doctor (uncredited)

Directed by
Stuart Rosenberg 
 
Writing credits
Robert Stone (screenplay)

Robert Stone (novel "A Hall of Mirrors")

Produced by
John Foreman .... producer
Hank Moonjean .... associate producer
Paul Newman .... producer
 
Original Music by
Lalo Schifrin 
 
Cinematography by
Richard Moore (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Bob Wyman 
 
Casting by
Hoyt Bowers (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Philip M. Jefferies  (as Philip Jefferies)
 
Set Decoration by
William Kiernan 
 
Costume Design by
Travilla 
 
Makeup Department
Sydney Guilaroff .... hair stylist: Miss Woodward
Lynn F. Reynolds .... makeup artist (as Lynn Reynolds)
Lorraine Roberson .... hairdresser
Jack Wilson .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Austen Jewell .... unit production manager
Arthur S. Newman Jr. .... unit production manager (as Arthur Newman Jr.)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Leslie Gorall .... assistant director
Hank Moonjean .... assistant director
Clancy Herne .... assistant director (uncredited)
Hawk Koch .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Anthony Bavero .... prop master (uncredited)
James F. Orendorff .... construction manager (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jerry Jost .... sound recordist
Richard Portman .... sound recordist
Terrance Emerson .... sound cable man (uncredited)
Bill Hank .... sound recordist (uncredited)
Dean Hodges .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Stunts
May Boss .... stunts (uncredited)
Carol Daniels .... stunts (uncredited)
Charlie Picerni .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Robert J. Banks .... gaffer (uncredited)
William N. Clark .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Richard Debolt .... camera & mechanical design (uncredited)
Lloyd Isbell .... grip (uncredited)
Roger Shearman .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Norma Brown .... wardrobe: ladies
Bill Smith .... wardrobe: men
Nat Tolmach .... wardrobe: men
 
Music Department
Lalo Schifrin .... conductor
Richard Hazard .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Al Mack .... music supervisor (uncredited)
Tommy Tedesco .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Betty Crosby .... script supervisor
M. James Arnett .... dialogue coach (uncredited)
Annabelle King .... production assistant (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements involving violence, drug and alcohol use, sexual content and nudity
Runtime:
115 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Sweden:15 | UK:AA | USA:GP | USA:PG-13 (certificate #22300)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The famed Preservation Hall Jazz Band of New Orleans appears in the film. Preservation Hall on St. Peter Street has been a venue for New Orleans jazz since 1961.See more »
Quotes:
Rheinhardt:[at the microphone, supposedly trying to calm a panicked crowd] Fellow Americans. Fellow Americans. Let us consider the American way. The American way... is innocence. In each and every situation we must display an innocence that is so vast and awesome that the entire world is reduced by it. When our boys drop a napalm bomb on a cluster of gibbering slants...
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
References Uncle Tom's Cabin (1965)See more »
Soundtrack:
Glory RoadSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
14 out of 25 people found the following review useful.
A case of potential untapped, but good to see something on this..., 14 April 2002
Author: Tom May (joycean_chap@hotmail.com) from United Kingdom

Whilst I would make it clear that I enjoyed much of this film, I would make it equally clear that I found a fair amount of it ill-developed and tediously clunky.

It is a ripe political melodrama, clearly borne out of passions and disappointments which arose from the particular year of 1968 and lingered long into the 1970s. I don't think I could make much argument with the previous commentator's view that the film is made from a certain left-liberal point of view. But a moderate left-liberal stance, and tacitly so. Despite saying that, Anthony Perkins' character - an embodiment in many ways of the "liberal" stereotype - is not made particularly sympathetic. Well-meaning, obsessive, anguished and humourless, I would agree with the Time Out reviewer that it was astute - if unimaginative - casting. Perkins comes across as if his Norman Bates persona has been relocated to late-sixties urban America and forcibly invested with a political conscience.

Paul Newman, who shares perhaps too few scenes with his nemesis Perkins, is also rather good, as the wanderer with a certain cocksure touch, who easily becomes an on-air "communicator" for this WUSA radio station - which is involved in fraudulent dealings and far-right preachings. Newman is every inch the tabloid professional; he is able to claim that he has no agenda and is 'just doing a job'. His political views are ambiguous; his final speech indeed suggesting he has no real belief in the "new right". It difficult to precisely gauge what makes the character tick, besides an vague cynicism; he is as flawed and formidable as Perkins, but diametrically opposite, with his rejection of abstract morality: his behaviour set on a course of mere self-aid. He proves to be the adept survivor, in contrast to genuine ideologues of left or right, but he has no moderation instinct, and turns out somewhat troubled, baffled even, at the film's appropriately frazzled conclusion.

Then there is Joanne Woodward; first film I have seen her in, and one of I gather, many, with Newman. Her character is a trifle ineffectual, present, as if a chess piece, to engage the elusive Reinhardt's desires for a period, and to provide a more 'ordinary' site of audience identification, who does not have right or left-wing politics, and does have more endearing traits: at least compared with Reinhardt. Woodward is quite memorable, cutting a wilting, waning figure as this unfortunate woman, herself much as transitory as Newman at the film's beginning. If she convinces as a 'realistic' character, it is albeit as one implicitly used to condemn the excesses of the New Right and the confrontational politics of the time. Her sickly teariness near the close, and the fact of her being the only person in the riotous hall to listen to Newman's absurdest "we're o.k.!" irony, suggests an idealised 'ordinary person' wrapped up in harmful political events. This is all rather undignified and melodramatic to stand for one who is expected to take this overwrought stuff seriously, and merely serves to draw out some of Reinhardt's humanity for the ending.

Newman does invest Reinhardt with a portion of his customary charm, but this is largely and effectively shown to be a front. Woodward is taken in, like the general audience as it were, by this superficial charm, and she ends up broken both by Newman's inconsistent, careless attitude and by the rupturing of the society depicted.

The film does not go far enough with many of its themes, and I did expect rather more in the dramatic and comic departments - if melodrama is going to work it needs either grand force or a bathetic line in absurdity. The whole lacks humour: born of a self-consciously 'serious' grounding in the subjectivity of U.S. politics in the late-sixties era. On this point, note that Laurence Harvey is vastly under-used; and he of that deeply substantial and bizarre masterpiece of a political thriller, "The Manchurian Candidate"... And additionally, we never see enough of Newman's dealings and relationships with his Rightist colleagues - similarly to how we never see Perkins in the broader context of Left politics. Loose ends were certainly left untied as regards Perkins' character.

I did on the whole quite enjoy this, but it was not a particularly entertaining film: variable in its plotting, dialogue and tone. A case of potential untapped? Undoubtedly. But it is worth paying close attention to those central performances, and it is at least part of its era's Hollywood; markedly less 'safe' and conformist then than now.

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