IMDb > All That Heaven Allows (1955)
All That Heaven Allows
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All That Heaven Allows (1955) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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7.7/10   10,210 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Up 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Peg Fenwick (screenplay)
Edna L. Lee (story) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for All That Heaven Allows on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 April 1956 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
How much does Heaven Allow a Woman in Love?
Plot:
An upper-class widow falls in love with a much younger, down-to-earth nurseryman, much to the disapproval of her children and criticism of her country club peers. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win See more »
NewsDesk:
(97 articles)
User Reviews:
Disney was never so magical - Sirk polishes weepy romance to an exquisite gloss See more (95 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Jane Wyman ... Cary Scott

Rock Hudson ... Ron Kirby

Agnes Moorehead ... Sara Warren

Conrad Nagel ... Harvey

Virginia Grey ... Alida Anderson

Gloria Talbott ... Kay Scott

William Reynolds ... Ned Scott

Charles Drake ... Mick Anderson

Hayden Rorke ... Dr. Dan Hennessy

Jacqueline deWit ... Mona Plash (as Jacqueline de Wit)

Leigh Snowden ... Jo-Ann Grisby

Donald Curtis ... Howard Hoffer

Alex Gerry ... George Warren

Nestor Paiva ... Manuel
Forrest Lewis ... Mr. Weeks

Tol Avery ... Tom Allenby

Merry Anders ... Mary Ann
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Helen Andrews ... Myrtle (uncredited)

Eleanor Audley ... Mrs. Humphrey (uncredited)

Lillian Culver ... Mrs. Taylor (uncredited)
Jack Davidson ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Alan DeWitt ... Stationmaster (uncredited)
Helen Dickson ... Party Guest (uncredited)

Art Gilmore ... Trailer Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Donna Jo Gribble ... Miss Taylor (uncredited)
Jim Hayward ... John (uncredited)
Helene Heigh ... Ann (uncredited)

David Janssen ... Freddie Norton (uncredited)
Anthony Jochim ... Grandpa Adams (uncredited)

Paul Keast ... Mark Plash (uncredited)
Jack Lomas ... Fred (uncredited)
Helen Mayon ... Nurse (uncredited)
Joseph Mell ... Mr. Gow - the Butcher (uncredited)

Forbes Murray ... Country Club Member (uncredited)
Vernon Rich ... Bill (uncredited)

Gia Scala ... Marguerita - Manuel's Daughter (uncredited)

Charles Sherlock ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Edna Smith ... Miss Edna Pidway (uncredited)

Paul Smith ... Tom - Christmas Tree Vendor (uncredited)
Rosa Turich ... Rosanne - Manuel's Wife (uncredited)

Directed by
Douglas Sirk 
 
Writing credits
Peg Fenwick (screenplay)

Edna L. Lee (story) and
Harry Lee (story)

Produced by
Ross Hunter .... producer
 
Original Music by
Frank Skinner 
 
Cinematography by
Russell Metty (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Frank Gross 
Fred Baratta (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Alexander Golitzen 
Eric Orbom 
 
Set Decoration by
Russell A. Gausman 
Julia Heron (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Bill Thomas (gowns)
 
Makeup Department
Joan St. Oegger .... hair stylist
Bud Westmore .... makeup artist
Nick Marcellino .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Vincent Romaine .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Sergei Petschnikoff .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Joseph E. Kenney .... assistant director (as Joseph E. Kenny)
George Lollier .... assistant director (uncredited)
Gordon McLean .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Leslie I. Carey .... sound
Joe Lapis .... sound
Frank Gorback .... microphone technician (uncredited)
David Janssen .... looping (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Fred Knoth .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ledge Haddow .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Edward Hobson .... best boy grip (uncredited)
Philip H. Lathrop .... camera operator (uncredited)
Max Nippell .... gaffer (uncredited)
Dean Paup .... key grip (uncredited)
Kenneth Smith .... dolly grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Rose Brandi .... wardrobe supervisor: Jane Wyman (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Joseph Gershenson .... music supervisor
Ethmer Roten .... musician: flute
 
Other crew
William Fritzsche .... Technicolor color consultant
Jack Daniels .... dialogue director (uncredited)
Betty A. Griffin .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
89 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor and Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.75 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This film seems to borrow its title from the last line of the poem 'love and life' by Jhn Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester: " All my past Life is mine no more, The flying Hours are gone: Like Transitory Dreams giv'n o'er, Whose Images are kept in store By Memory alone. The Time that is to come is not; How can it then be mine The present Moment's all my Lot; And that, as fast as it is got, Phillis, is only thine. Then talk not of Inconstancy, False Hearts, and broken Vows; If I, by Miracle, can be This live-long Minute true to thee, 'Tis all that Heav'n allows. "See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: We first see Carie drive a 1955 2 door Lincoln. Several scenes later she is driving a 4 door Lincoln. I guess she could have traded it in within that short of time.See more »
Quotes:
Mona Plash:You know what everyone said.
Cary Scott:No, but I'm sure you do.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Joy to the WorldSee more »

FAQ

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40 out of 49 people found the following review useful.
Disney was never so magical - Sirk polishes weepy romance to an exquisite gloss, 17 January 2004
Author: bmacv from Western New York

Douglas Sirk's All That Heaven Allows could stand as a lesson about how, in gifted hands, movies can surmount and surpass their source material, elevating the routine into the rhapsodic. And that's more than a matter of just fleshing out the roles with appealing talent or supplying de luxe production values. It takes a sensibility that can suggest the complexity under the commonplace and spot the verities hidden beneath the clichés.

It's an alert sensibility that many emigrés from Europe, apprenticed in the artistic ferment between the wars, brought with them to Hollywood (among them this Dane, born Detlef Sierck). Hollywood gave them more money and security than they'd probably ever known, and when it also gave them hackneyed and meretricious scripts to capture on film, they devised new ways to freshen them up and, against all odds, make them work.

On its surface, All That Heaven Allows is little more than polite fiction from women's magazines circa mid-20th-century (and would today be a romance paperback with a beefcake cover). Youngish widow Jane Wyman starts keeping company with free-spirited Rock Hudson, her much younger gardener; despite wagging tongues among her country-club set and clucks of disapproval from her grown children, she finds, after many a twist and turn, true love.

But from his opening shot Sirk creates a dreamy, storybook world, so Disney-pretty that he might as well have started with `Once upon a time....' Swirling downward from a church steeple in a New England autumn, he shows us an affluent enclave just a commuter-train trip away from New York. Luncheons are taken on patios, station wagons the approved mode of travel and martinis the drink of the evening - the kind of town New Yorkers played by Bette Davis or Barbara Stanwyck meant when they referred to their `country' places in Connecticut.

In this idyllic bower, Wyman has resigned herself to a stately and well-appointed widowhood; she half-heartedly resists friend Agnes Moorehead's lures to put her back on the market (women without men, by choice or circumstance, just don't fit in). But Wyman's too classy for the boozed-up louts and gossipy shrews in her former set, and still too vital to succumb to valetudinarian Conrad Nagel's proposal for tepid `companionship.'

And that's when Hudson, come to prune the branches, catches her eye - and, somewhat less probably, she his. He whisks her out to see his tree farm, and they explore an old mill on his property (`I love to poke around old buildings,' she explains). When she suggests he fix up the dump and live there, it's to the horn theme from the last movement of Brahms' 1st Symphony. No wonder she ends up staying the weekend.

Here Sirk introduces a subtly subversive element: Hudson's friends, in discordant counterpoint to hers (who dismiss him as `nature boy' and a `good-looking set of muscles'). His are an amiably casual network of all ages and backgrounds who have opted out of the rat race or never cared to enter it (the `quiet desperation' passage from Thoreau's Walden screws the point home). Though their style of merrymaking brings to mind Old World folk festivals, they represent a segment of society rarely if ever seen in films of the era: Low-profile, thoughtful rebels against the smug status quo - post-war pioneers of the voluntary simplicity movement inflamed with a touch of ecological consciousness ( now laughed off as tree-hugging). It's a startling glimpse into a below-the-radar counterculture that must have been around even in the mid-'50s (and there's not a beret, goatee or bongo drum among them - they're presented without a hint of condescension or marginalization).

Hudson proposes, Wyman accepts. Even her children (Gloria Talbott and William Reynolds) are thrilled, so long as they assume her remarriage will be to stuffy, respectable Nagel. When they're told that their new stepdad will be the stud who cleans up the yard come spring and come fall, they go rigid with upper-middle-class snobbery. (And the specter of Mrs. Grundy floats in when Moorehead asks if people will think Wyman and Hudson were keeping company when Wyman's husband was still kicking.) Stranded between her familiar past and an uncertain future, Wyman begs for more time; Hudson, hewing to his mantra `to thine own self be true,' delivers an ultimatum....

Abetted by director of photography Russell Metty, Sirk paints this soapish weeper with a gorgeous palette of hues and tints (a feat that Todd Haynes emulated in his Sirk hommage Far From Heaven, for which this movie served as template). Now and again, he washes half the screen in an autumnal green-gold, the other in an enchanted-night mauve, situating characters at cross purposes in their respective halves.

Of course, splitting or doubling the screen, through barriers or mirror shots, is one of Sirk's signature tropes, reaching its apex when Wyman's hangdog face stares back from a newly delivered television set, a Christmas present from the kids (`Here's all the company you need. Drama, comedy, all life's parade at your fingertips,' goes the spiel.) Pointedly, the set never gets turned on; it's seen but once again, reflecting flames from the fireplace, the focal point of simpler, less sophisticated times, and the values Hudson embodies.

Sirk takes this unlikely June-September romance and buffs it to the highest possible gloss, using his exquisite eye to enrich and deepen every frame. It's lush and sensuous - almost candified (at times gluttingly so) - and all but impossible to resist. When, at the close, a deer gambols up to nuzzle some snow off the windowpane in the mill Hudson has turned into his - their - home, it's an embarrassment of perfection. Never was Disney so magical.

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