IMDb > Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931)
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.7/10   8,046 votes »
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Down 18% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Samuel Hoffenstein (screen play) and
Percy Heath (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
3 January 1932 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Put yourself in her place! The dreaded night when her lover became a madman!
Plot:
Dr. Jekyll faces horrible consequences when he lets his dark side run wild with a potion that changes him into the animalistic Mr. Hyde. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 2 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
"I'll show you what horror means!" See more (92 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Fredric March ... Dr. Henry Jekyll / Mr. Hyde

Miriam Hopkins ... Ivy Pearson
Rose Hobart ... Muriel Carew
Holmes Herbert ... Dr. Lanyon
Halliwell Hobbes ... Brigadier-General Carew
Edgar Norton ... Poole
Tempe Pigott ... Mrs. Hawkins
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Adair ... Ivy's Admirer at Music Hall (uncredited)
Leonard Carey ... Briggs - Lanyon's Butler (uncredited)
Pat Harmon ... Music Hall Customer (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Boyd Irwin ... Police Inspector (uncredited)
Tom London ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Arnold Lucy ... Utterson (uncredited)
Murdock MacQuarrie ... Dissenting Doctor at Lecture (uncredited)
Eric Mayne ... Lanyon's Associate at Lecture (uncredited)
G.L. McDonnell ... Hobson - Carew's Butler (uncredited)
John Rogers ... Music Hall Waiter (uncredited)
Douglas Walton ... Blond Student (uncredited)
Eric Wilton ... Briggs - Lanyon's Butler (uncredited)

Directed by
Rouben Mamoulian 
 
Writing credits
Samuel Hoffenstein (screen play) and
Percy Heath (screen play)

Robert Louis Stevenson (based on the novel by)

Produced by
Adolph Zukor .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Karl Struss (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
William Shea (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Hans Dreier (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Travis Banton (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Norbert A. Myles .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Wally Westmore .... special makeup effects artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Robert Lee .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
M.M. Paggi .... sound (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Chick Collins .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
George T. Clemens .... second camera (uncredited)
Harry Hallenberger .... second camera (uncredited)
Gordon Head .... still photographer (uncredited)
Charles Leahy .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Cliff Shirpser .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Fleet Southcott .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Herman Hand .... music adaptor: Bach (uncredited)
Rudolph G. Kopp .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
John Leipold .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Ralph Rainger .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Adolph Zukor .... presenter
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
98 min | 96 min (TCM print)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 (1933) | Finland:(Banned) (1932) | Netherlands:6 (2004) (DVD) | Sweden:15 | UK:A | UK:12 (video rating) | UK:12A (2008) | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #1002-R: 22 June 1935 for re-release)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The remarkable Jekyll-to-Hyde transition scenes in this film were accomplished by manipulating a series of variously colored filters in front of the camera lens. Fredric March's Hyde makeup was in various colors, and the way his appearance registered on the film depended on which color filter was being shot through. During the first transformation scene, the accompanying noises on the soundtrack included portions of Bach, a gong being played backwards, and, reportedly, a recording of director Rouben Mamoulian's own heart. Only in the late 1960's did Mamoulian reveal how they were done.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When Hyde looks into the mirror through the subjective camera, his "reflection" has two stains on his shirt on what would be the right hand side of the shirt if a true mirror image. However in the next shot where we see both of the Hydes, the mirror image and the real image, the stains are now on the left hand side of the shirt. This confirms that the subjective camera view was achieved by the 'mirror' really being a hole in the wall with the actor facing the camera.See more »
Quotes:
Mr. Hyde:[after strangling Ivy] Isn't Hyde a lover after your own heart?See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ in F Minor, BWV 639See more »

FAQ

How does the movie end?
Was Mr Hyde's makeup patterned after Larry Talbot's makeup in "The Wolf Man"?
Is it pronounced "Jekyll" or "Jeekyll"?
See more »
54 out of 61 people found the following review useful.
"I'll show you what horror means!", 31 January 2001
Author: The_Movie_Cat from England

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is Paramount doing Universal better than Universal did themselves. While this was a cash-in on the genre success of the smaller studio, if all bandwagons were this well made then cinema would be a much richer experience.

Oh, it's dated of course. A form of stiff melodrama where women still said things like "Darling... I wish this moment would last forever" and men replied "Oh, I love you... be near me always." And I love how the camera coyly veers away during the kissing scene. An odd dialogue gem is Dr.Jekyll (Frederic March) proclaiming: "We'll be so gloriously happy that even the French will be jealous of us." Look out too for Edgar Norton as Poole, offering advice to Jekyll when told his fiancée will be away for a month. "I beg your pardon, sir," he says, "but may I suggest that you ought to amuse yourself?" Yes, the dialogue is overblown, but in a wonderful, glorious way. Like a great stream-of-consciousness from the pen of a man who sees screen realism as just a petty distraction.

But what really works is the innovation of the film, almost dripping off the celluloid. I don't know if those wipes from scene to scene, the fades and the first-person perspective were originated here, but they're used superbly nonetheless. Often the frame hesitates between wipes, carving the illusion that so much is going on simultaneously that one screen cannot house it all. And the single take transformation (As Hyde says, "What you are about to see is a secret you are sworn not to reveal" – it's tinted lens effects were kept hidden for many years) is absolutely magnificent, even 70 years on.

Every single shot is worked out with a mind to an unusual angle, or a unique way of framing things, but never so that it's showy. Often the main action will be taken via longshot, the camera choosing to focus on a sole candelabrum in the foreground while the scene plays out. It's subtexts of bare backs; cleavages, thighs and garter belts are also quite racy for the time. Look how even when Jekyll has left Ivy behind, her seductively rocking leg is merged with the next scene for nearly half a minute to indicate temptation is lingering in his mind. Outstanding.

The sets, too, are unparalleled, street settings often running to several levels and making a mockery of the rival studio's sub-realist fare. The outdoor segments set to rain are exquisite, and look out for an amusing scene – the first between Miriam Hopkins and Hyde – where they engage in an accidental spitting competition. As he says the phrase "pig sty" an unintentional (?) spray of saliva coats his co-star, while a large globule of phlegm hits him in return as she says "Buckingham Palace."

Weirdly, the Doctor's name is pronounced "Gee-kul", not the commonly held "Jek-ull". I've always thought Jekyll seemed a creepier name than the passive-sounding Hyde. Maybe that's the point, and the duality of such a concept is passed forward by many shots of Hyde seeing his face via a mirror. March is not without the wit to add humour to his other persona (who resembles more Dick Emery's comedy Vicar than anything truly horrific), and is in equal terms expert in both pathos and menace. His physicality in the role also cannot be overlooked. Not only that, but you get the real feeling that you're joining March on a discovery; with each new turn of plot as much a surprise to him as it is to us. This is a real loving performance, a far cry from the "take the money and run" sensibilities of The Wolf Man.

Hyde has his violent moments, threatening to glass a man with a broken bottle – "His face was made for it" – and intimating rape. It's a showstopping performance and there's even one scene where Hyde appears to break the fourth wall – yet he's looking through the camera and into the next room. Mere technicalities are beneath the thoroughly insane Hyde. "I shall go only as far as the door, and the sight of your tears will bring me back" he hisses to a terrified Hopkins with double-meaning menace.

With it's literary script that encompasses both Bach and Shakespeare, it's a lovably fluid, fast-paced piece. Sometimes it's not always subtle – take the scene where Hopkins tells Jekyll he's got "the kindest heart in the world" and asks him for a bottle of poison "so I can kill myself, sir." But look at the anguish on March's face as the guilt of his alter ego's actions bleed through. If only all films could be made with such care and love in their craft. Absolutely Tremendous. 9/10.

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