6.8/10
42,930
179 user 243 critic

Florence Foster Jenkins (2016)

Trailer
2:25 | Trailer

Watch Now

With Prime Video

ALL
The story of Florence Foster Jenkins, a New York heiress who dreamed of becoming an opera singer, despite having a terrible singing voice.

Director:

Stephen Frears

Writer:

Nicholas Martin
Reviews
Popularity
3,201 ( 52)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 39 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Julie & Julia (2009)
Biography | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Julia Child's story of her start in the cooking profession is intertwined with blogger Julie Powell's 2002 challenge to cook all the recipes in Child's first book.

Director: Nora Ephron
Stars: Amy Adams, Meryl Streep, Chris Messina
The Iron Lady (2011)
Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

An elderly Margaret Thatcher talks to the imagined presence of her recently deceased husband as she struggles to come to terms with his death while scenes from her past life, from girlhood to British prime minister, intervene.

Director: Phyllida Lloyd
Stars: Meryl Streep, Jim Broadbent, Richard E. Grant
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A look at the lives of the strong-willed women of the Weston family, whose paths have diverged until a family crisis brings them back to the Oklahoma house they grew up in, and to the dysfunctional woman who raised them.

Director: John Wells
Stars: Meryl Streep, Dermot Mulroney, Julia Roberts
Comedy | Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

A musician who gave up everything for her dream of rock-and-roll stardom returns home, looking to make things right with her family.

Director: Jonathan Demme
Stars: Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, Mamie Gummer
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

When attending their son's college graduation, a couple reignite the spark in their relationship. But the complicated fact is they're divorced and he's remarried.

Director: Nancy Meyers
Stars: Meryl Streep, Steve Martin, Alec Baldwin
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Meryl Streep ... Florence Foster Jenkins
Hugh Grant ... St Clair Bayfield
Simon Helberg ... Cosmé McMoon
Rebecca Ferguson ... Kathleen
Nina Arianda ... Agnes Stark
Stanley Townsend ... Phineas Stark
Allan Corduner ... John Totten
Christian McKay ... Earl Wilson
David Haig ... Carlo Edwards
John Sessions ... Dr. Hermann
Brid Brennan ... Kitty
John Kavanagh ... Arturo Toscanini
Pat Starr Pat Starr ... Mrs Vanderbilt
Maggie Steed ... Mrs James O'Flaherty
Thelma Barlow Thelma Barlow ... Mrs Oscar Garmunder
Edit

Storyline

Florence Foster Jenkins, an heiress from NYC, always wanted to be a concert pianist and play Carnegie Hall. An injury in her youth deterred that dream, so she sets out to sing her way to Carnegie Hall, knowing the only way to get there would be, "Practice, practice, practice". Her husband supports her venture, and Florence Foster Jenkins' performance at Carnegie Hall becomes a truly historic event. Written by stephen scialli

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The inspiring true story of the world's worst singer. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for brief suggestive material. | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK | France

Language:

English | German | Italian | Russian

Release Date:

12 August 2016 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Florence See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$29,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,601,313, 12 August 2016, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$27,370,107, 23 October 2016

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,080,000, 12 August 2016
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color | Black and White (some footage)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The scene where Jenkins (Streep) visits McMoon (Helberg) at his apartment, McMoon is busy lifting weights. This is a nod to the real McMoon who couldn't make a career in music after working with Jenkins and had to give up music to become a bodybuilder. See more »

Goofs

Toscanini gratefully accepts $1,000 from Florence Foster Jenkins. In real life, Toscanini would not have been short of money. In the 1940s he lived at Wave Hill, a mansion where Theodore Roosevelt and Mark Twain had lived. See more »

Quotes

St Clair Bayfield: In the hall, Madam Florence keeps a collection of chairs in which people of note have expired. They're not for practical use.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood Express: Episode #14.33 (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Charlie's Prelude
Written by Lou Singer (as Louis C. Singer)
Performed by John Kirby
Licensed courtesy of GHB Jazz Foundation
Published by Universal/MCA Music Ltd
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A gently comedic story of love and deceit.

Perpetuating little white lies is part of everyday life and keeps society ticking over. But to what point is it acceptable to massage an ego with a dirty black lie. A real whopper. And is such a lie perpetuated by love? Greed? Or the pursuit of personal glory? This is the rather subtle sub-text behind the story of Florence Foster Jenkins.

Based on a true story, Florence Foster Jenkins tells the story of a truly awful singer (Meryl Streep), cossetted in her closed world of a 1944 New York hotel and pampered by her husband St Clair Mayfield (Hugh Grant), who is otherwise entwined with the sensuous Kathleen (Rebecca Ferguson). Together with ex-actor Mayfield, the wealthy Florence is the co-star of the show at her self-owned "Verdi Club" where she has a non-speaking role enacting various 'tableau' scenes. But in the interests of following her dreams she recruits the help of famous singing instructor Carlo Edwards (the marvellous David Haig) and an enthusiastic and personable young pianist Cosme McMoon (Simon Helberg, "The Big Bang Theory"). Carlo is aware of what he is in for (he wants to keep the arrangement 'on the quiet'); Cosme is not (to great comic effect).

This classic re-telling of 'The Emperor's New Clothes' ultimately takes us on a journey to a packed concert at the Carnegie Hall, where many of the tickets have been given away to rowdy and drunk servicemen.

It's impossible to describe a film as "delightful… just delightful" without hearing the velvety tones of Hugh Grant saying those words. But that's what it is. A treat of moving and at times wildly funny storytelling from director Stephen Frears ("Philomena", "The Queen") that just works from beginning to end.

Meryl Streep is just glorious in the titular role, oozing charm. Those UK readers will probably fondly remember the piano playing 'skills' of the late, great comedian Les Dawson (google it for a youtube clip) who had to be an absolutely brilliant pianist to be able to deliberately play so badly. In a similar way, we know (from the likes of "Mamma Mia") that Streep knows how to belt out a good tune, so it requires some considerable skill to deliver Florence's songs as well (or as badly) as she does. Bravo Ms Streep, Bravo!

And Hugh Grant is often quite unfairly criticized for playing Hugh Grant in every movie (as if Tom Hanks and Harrison Ford are much different?), but here he turns in a totally sterling performance. The drivers behind Mayfield's character are never totally clear (and I won't spoil that here), but in the final reel the motivating factor becomes crystal clear, and Grant has never been better. (Bravo Mr Grant, Bravo!).

To round off the accolades for the lead performances, Simon Helberg turns in a genius comic performance as the goggle-eyed pianist, who lights up every scene he's in and delivers his lines (e.g. one about a naval encounter) with perfect comic timing.

Shining again in a supporting role is Rebecca Ferguson ("Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation") who once again is dazzling. Among the bright young acting newcomers of the likes of Vikander and Rooney, Ferguson (who is approaching her mid-30s) brings a level of sophisticated glamour and maturity to the screen that is strongly reminiscent of the great starlets of the 1940's and 50's like Kathrine Hepburn or Lana Turner. She is fast becoming one of my favourite actresses. Also worthy of note is Nina Arianda as gold- digging starlet Agnes Stark – effectively playing (at least at first) the "little boy in the crowd" in the Emperor's fable.

Written by TV-writer Nicholas Martin in his big-screen debut, the story is slowly and subtly unwoven, only progressively revealing the plot points in an intelligent manner. Other screenwriters take note: this is how to do it.

Cinematography is by the great Danny Cohen ("The Danish Girl"; "Room") and with the Production Design, Costuming and Special effects crew 1940's New York is vibrantly brought to life.

While the film's leisurely pace might make the younger set fidgety, this is a treat particularly for older viewers looking for a great night out at the cinema. The film got a good old-fashioned round of applause at my showing when the credits came up. "Delightful… just delightful". Go see it.

(Please visit http://bob-the-movie-man.com for the graphical version of this review and to comment with your thoughts. Thanks).


108 of 135 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 179 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed