The untold story of the last days in the tragic times of Oscar Wilde, a person who observes his own failure with ironic distance and regards the difficulties that beset his life with detachment and humor.

Director:

Rupert Everett

Writer:

Rupert Everett
5 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Colin Firth ... Reggie Turner
Rupert Everett ... Oscar Wilde
Emily Watson ... Constance Wilde
Colin Morgan ... Alfred Bosie Douglas
Anna Chancellor ... Lydia Arbuthnott
Tom Wilkinson ... Father Cuthbert Dunne
Béatrice Dalle ... Café-Concert Manager
Ronald Pickup ... Judge
Julian Wadham ... Mr. Arbuthnott
John Standing ... Dr. Tucker
Joshua McGuire ... Ambrose Smithers
Benjamin Voisin ... Jean
Daniel Weyman ... Beauchamp Denis Brown
Edwin Thomas ... Robert Robbie Ross
Ciro Petrone ... Fisherman at Christmas Party
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Storyline

In a cheap Parisian hotel room Oscar Wilde lies on his death bed. The past floods back, taking him to other times and places. Was he once the most famous man in London? The artist crucified by a society that once worshipped him? Under the microscope of death he reviews the failed attempt to reconcile with his long suffering wife Constance, the ensuing reprisal of his fatal love affair with Lord Alfred Douglas and the warmth and devotion of Robbie Ross, who tried and failed to save him from himself. Travelling through Wilde's final act and journeys through England, France and Italy, the transience of lust is laid bare and the true riches of love are revealed. It is a portrait of the dark side of a genius who lived and died for love. Written by Beta Film GmbH

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The last days of Oscar Wilde - and the ghosts that haunted them - are vividly evoked...

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual content, graphic nudity, language and brief drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Colin Firth and Rupert Everett appeared in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (2002), as well as Another Country (1984), St. Trinian's (2007), St Trinian's 2: The Legend of Fritton's Gold (2009), and Shakespeare in Love (1998), in which Everett made an uncredited appearance as Christopher Marlowe. See more »

Goofs

Oscar is shown at Clapham Junction in prison garb with the number 33. He is on the way to Reading Gaol where he is assigned cell C33. See more »

Quotes

Reggie Turner: From what you say, Oscar, it would seem that Reading Gaol is an enchanted castle. With the governor as its presiding elf.
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Crazy Credits

During the end credits Oscar Wilde is heard and seen singing a French song in a cafe. Then there are flashbacks of audiences applauding his works in a theatre. See more »

Connections

Featured in Projector: The Happy Prince (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Symphony No 6 in B Minor op. 74 Pathetique
Written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (as P. Tchaikovsky)
Performed by Gürzenich Orchestra of Cologne
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User Reviews

 
Sensitive and compelling but I felt unmoved
20 June 2018 | by willst01See all my reviews

Rupert Everett fulfils a long-held ambition here to make a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde, and in the title role he is simply terrific - he is never off the screen. To write it and direct it as well, however, is to take on too much; indeed the need for an objective view is often apparent when it comes to narrative and structure. The film starts slowly (with a dreadful cardboard cut-out of London by night that could have taken from Olivier's wartime Henry V) and it's some time before the flashbacks (and flashbacks within flashbacks) begin. Supporting performances, especially from Colin Morgan as Bosie and Emily Watson (under-used) as Constance, are excellent and the photography,(particularly in the Italian sequences) beautiful, though I found the half-shadows of the faces in the candlelight rather tiresome. I must add that, for someone who is penniless and constantly on the run, Wilde does possess a large wardrobe. There is more humour than one might expect (I won't spoil your enjoyment by quoting any of the jokes but I found the sequence where the priest (Tom Wilkinson) comes to give Wilde the extreme unction especially hilarious). Great attention is paid to the soundtrack, but why the use of Tchaikovsky's Pathetique Symphony at the end? All in all a fine effort, but I did leave the cinema strangely unmoved.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

UK | Belgium | Italy | Germany

Language:

Latin | English | French | Italian

Release Date:

10 October 2018 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Happy Prince See more »

Filming Locations:

Bavaria, Germany See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$38,886, 14 October 2018

Gross USA:

$466,440

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,621,992
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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