5.7/10
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11 user 8 critic

Stella Days (2011)

TV-14 | | Drama | 22 June 2012 (USA)
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A small town cinema in rural Ireland becomes the setting for a dramatic struggle between faith and passion, Rome and Hollywood and a man and his conscience.

Writers:

Michael Doorley (inspired: by the memoir "Stella Days" by), Antoine O. Flatharta
1 win & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Barbara Adair Barbara Adair ... Peggy
Sarah Ahearne Sarah Ahearne ... Small Girl
Brendan Conroy Brendan Conroy ... Billy
Sheila Cox Sheila Cox ... Legion of Mary Woman 2
Derbhle Crotty Derbhle Crotty ... Julia McSweeney (as Derbhla Crotty)
Alan Curran Alan Curran ... Verger
Seán Doyle Seán Doyle ... Jumper
Gail Fitzpatrick Gail Fitzpatrick ... Sally
John Galvin John Galvin ... Priest
Noel Gaskin Noel Gaskin ... Fr Keenan
Stephen Gillic Stephen Gillic ... Young Daniel
Trystan Gravelle ... Tim Lynch
David Herlihy David Herlihy ... Emmet Quinn
Tom Hickey Tom Hickey ... Bishop Hegarty
Amy Huberman ... Eileen
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Storyline

A small town cinema in rural Ireland becomes the setting for a dramatic struggle between faith and passion, Rome and Hollywood and a man and his conscience.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

One man, a small town and a big idea.

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Ireland | Norway | Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 June 2012 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kino Stella See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Romola Garai was attached for so long to Stella Days, but when the filming could finally go ahead, she had to drop out due to schedule conflicts with other projects. See more »

Quotes

Brendan McSweeney: You still want to go back to Rome?
Fr. Daniel Barry: They made a twenty eight year old the head curator after I'd been promised that position. He was an Italian of course. I still have my pride.
Brendan McSweeney: So you kicked up a bit of a fuss.
Fr. Daniel Barry: OH! I did. And I ended up here.
Brendan McSweeney: It could have been worse. You could have ended up in the Aran Islands.
See more »

Connections

Features Cover Girl (1944) See more »

Soundtracks

O heil'ge Tranen inn'ger Reue
Written by Robert Schumann
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User Reviews

 
'I thought I would find some meaning here. But its just poor-and damp'
26 June 2012 | by gradyharpSee all my reviews

Martin Sheen has landed a role that shows off his considerable talents in this small scale, sensitive and informed film from Tribeca. Based on a novel by Michael Doorley adapted for the screen by Antoine O. Flatharta and directed with sensitivity by Thaddeus O'Sullivan, the story takes place in Ireland of 1956, and the film opens with an introduction to bringing electricity into a very small town whose people have done very well without the new-fangled things, thank you very much.

The priest of the town is Fr. Daniel Barry (Martin Sheen), a loving man who hears confessions, makes his rounds offering oils of last rites to please one elderly ill patient and caring for his flock in a very human manner, is a man of the World having the Church both in America and Rome, who has a passion for Cinema , Music and Language is left to languish in a rural community after being replaced in Rome by a younger priest with greater credentials for scholarship. The Parish Bishop (Tom Hickey) has decided his parish needs a new, modern, concrete church and he burdens the parish priests to raise the funds for the project. There is a politician in the town - Brendan (Stephen Rea) - who vies for power with Fr. Barry, seeking political clout to reign in the filthy temptations of the world from his followers. Fr. Barry, on the other hand, devises a method for raising funds (and catering to his love for picture shows) by building a cinema. He is supported by a new young schoolteacher Tim (Trystan Gravelle, a young Welsh actor of great potential) - Fr. Barry overrode Brendan, further alienating himself. Tim finds room and board with a local young mother Elaine (Amy Huberman) whose alcoholic abusive husband is off to London leaving their young son Joey (Joseph O'Sllivan) without the nurturing of a father. The tale pits the worldly priest against the power hungry fundamentalist politicians and the significant people of the story are at first injured and then find a manner of redemption. In the end the 'bringing of light' to the little town in Tipperary via electricity and modern times merely reveals a path for conscientious folk to escape it all.

The cast is very strong, the musical score by Nicholas Hooper, and the countryside of Ireland is gorgeous. This is a little film with a big message that flies like a lark in the sky. Try to catch it!

Grady Harp


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