6.9/10
18,600
45 user 66 critic

Shaolin (2011)

Xin Shao Lin si (original title)
Trailer
2:14 | Trailer
After ambushing and killing his rival, losing everything in the process, dispirited warlord Hou Jie turns to a Shaolin monastery seeking salvation.

Director:

Benny Chan

Writers:

Alan Yuen (original screenplay), Chi Kwong Cheung | 3 more credits »
4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Shaoqun Yu ... Chinghai
Chen Zhiui Chen Zhiui ... Huo Lung
Xing Yu ... Chingkung
Jing Wu ... Chingneng (as Jacky Wu)
Nicholas Tse ... Tsao Man
Hai Yu Hai Yu ... Abbot
Andy Lau ... Hou Chieh / Chinochueh
Bingbing Fan ... Madam Hou
Shimadu Runa Shimadu Runa ... Nan
Xiaohong Shi Xiaohong Shi ... Sung Hu
Karl Eiselen Karl Eiselen ... Peter (as Karl Robert Eislen)
Alexander Mukhanov Alexander Mukhanov ... Roddick
Shi Tianshuo Shi Tianshuo ... Officer Shi
Qilong Li Qilong Li ... Huo's Officer
Jin Youming Jin Youming ... Hou's Butler
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Storyline

China is plunged into strife as feuding warlords try to expand their power by warring over neighboring lands. Fuelled by his success on the battlefield, young and arrogant Hao Jie sneers at Shaolin's masters after killing a rival warlord on their temple grounds. But the glory comes before a fall. His own family is wiped out in an unexpected turn of events and Hao is forced to take refuge with the monks. As the civil unrest spreads and the people suffer, Hao and the Shaolin masters are forced to take a fiery stand against the evil warlords. They launch a daring plan of rescue and escape. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Discipline, harmony & martial arts become one. See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Andy Lau's left hand was injured while he was filming a fight scene. See more »

Quotes

Abbot: A brave man is one who knows to return after having lost his way.
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Alternate Versions

The UK version is cut by 7 seconds due to animal cruelty. See more »

Connections

Remake of Shaolin Temple (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Shaolin: Opening Theme
Composed by Nicolas Errèra
Performed by The Bulgarian Symphony Orchestra
© 2011 Moviescore Media
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User Reviews

 
A once violent man learns the merits of non-violence... through extreme violence.
23 July 2011 | by oneguyramblingSee all my reviews

This might be the first film I've ever seen with Jackie Chan in a genuine supporting role. Since he started in films in the early 80s he has either been the STAR, the star, the co-star, or a mere cameo. There has been precious little in between.

Until now.

In an are in China where many warlords fought and struggled over territory and power, the Chinese Army were cruel and violent pricks – at least that's how they are portrayed here.

One of the worst of these was leader General Hou Jie, he callously orders the killing of innocent villagers for fear that they may possibly be harbouring the enemy, and the killing of the enemy because… well they're the enemy (can't argue that one). When his reluctant 2IC Cao Man expresses doubt at the level of violence and whether those targeted even deserve what is being dished out he receives an impromptu lesson: 'it is better to be the aggressor and be wrong than the passive dead guy', or something along those lines.

On this day though they follow an enemy into peaceful monk territory, a Shaolin temple. While the monks refuse to take sides they will not allow violence on their turf, and they protect the man. Initially.

Hou Jie backs down on his word and guns down the soldier in an act of proactive violence, pausing on the way out only to deface some sacred Shaloin signage. He gets home to his wife and adoring daughter who proudly shows him a drawing of him in action with the title 'My Daddy likes fighting' (I shouldn't judge, my boy might say 'My Daddy likes chips and beer!) Back in cautiously peaceful time Hou Jie becomes increasingly nervous about the prospect of being betrayed or attacked – even by his good friend and ally. In another unnecessary pre-emptive strike Hao Jie takes his friend out in cold blood purely to advance his own station and eradicate another potential rival and hindrance to his success.

Unfortunately though Hou Jie's actions and teaching eventually (and inevitably) work against him, his former 2IC Cao Man betrays him and Hou Jie must seek refuge immediately… but where? What follows is a generally rewarding tale of realisation and redemption. Jackie Chan (see how long it took to even mention him!) plays a humble and peaceful – yet eccentric – cook who kindly takes Hou Jie under his care.

After a period of time Hou Jie embraces the life of a monk montage-style, shaving his head a la Britney for a clean start – albeit without the insanity – and finds peace… for now. Because meanwhile Cao Man has effortlessly and successfully stepped into his shoes and is now just as ruthless and violent a leader.

Confusingly enough in a film about a violent and cruel man realising the error of his ways we always know that this pro-peace film will end in violence, and the action in the latter part of the film is worth the wait. There is an ax-fight that seemed quite realistic and dangerous, a chariot chase (of sorts) and the wire work was used sparingly enough to be forgiven for the most part. Andy Lau proves himself an adept and reasonably athletic martial artist, and there is no shortage of random monks ready to throw down… in self defense of course.

It takes a long while but even Jackie Chan gets to try his aching muscles out near the end of the film, even though in truth his entire role and fighting scenes are thematically at odds with the rest of the film and stand out like a sore thumb. It is like Jackie has now entered the Brian Dennehy / Morgan Freeman phase of his career as the elder statesman, only every director – and perhaps even Jackie himself – can't help but remember that he was once the pre-eminent cinematic martial artist on the planet, so they clumsily try to work him in.

Shaolin is a film book-ended by violence, the redemptive tale in the middle is supposed to provide the moral of the story I guess, but that could easily be forgotten by the 30 minute finale that ends in many dead when even the monks say 'enough'.

Final Rating – 6 / 10. Muddled morals aside Shaolin is well acted, reasonably well paced (aside from one interminably long 'will she / won't she?' scene that I can't spoil here) and contains a few of the better martial arts sequences filmed in the last few years.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Hong Kong | China

Language:

Mandarin | Cantonese

Release Date:

27 January 2011 (Hong Kong) See more »

Also Known As:

Shaolin See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$29,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$19,132, 11 September 2011

Gross USA:

$66,099

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$42,982,973
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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