6.6/10
5,092
24 user 121 critic

Faust (2011)

Not Rated | | Drama, Fantasy, Mystery | 15 November 2013 (USA)
Trailer
1:44 | Trailer
A despairing scholar sells his soul to Satan in exchange for one night with a beautiful young woman.

Director:

Aleksandr Sokurov

Writers:

Yuriy Arabov (book), Aleksandr Sokurov (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
15 wins & 26 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Johannes Zeiler ... Heinrich Faust
Anton Adasinsky ... Moneylender
Isolda Dychauk ... Margarete
Georg Friedrich ... Wagner
Hanna Schygulla ... Moneylender's 'Wife'
Antje Lewald Antje Lewald ... Margarete's Mother
Florian Brückner Florian Brückner ... Valentin
Maxim Mehmet ... Valentin's Friend
Sigurður Skúlason Sigurður Skúlason ... Faust's Father
Andreas Schmidt Andreas Schmidt ... Valentin's Friend
Oliver Bootz Oliver Bootz ... Valentin's Friend
Jonas Jägermeyr Jonas Jägermeyr ... Valentin's Friend
Igor Orozovic ... Valentin's Friend
Jirí Hampl Jirí Hampl ... Valentin's Friend
Joel Kirby ... Pater Philippe
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Storyline

A wise man sells his soul to Mefistofeles a Satan helper recognizing knowledge will bring no happiness to human life. A German Romanticism' portrait, on how love could overcome reason. Based on the true life of Dr. Johannes Faust, a German alchemist, who is supposed to have been killed when trying to discover the philosopher's stone.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Mystery

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in The Voice of Sokurov (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Salve Regina
(uncredited)
Gregorian chant
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User Reviews

Down in the dumps
4 November 2014 | by BaceserasSee all my reviews

It begins with the evisceration of a corpse, and that could be a metaphor for the way this alleged adaptation proceeds - except that Goethe's "Faust" is not dead, only given the dead-letter treatment here. The film's emphasis is on gross, clumsy physicality: you never saw so many actors stumble as they walk, bumping into things and one another; too artless and unfunny for slapstick, the universal jostling is prevented from being laughable by funereal pacing and the array of hangdog faces. Since the Faust figure (Johannes Zeiler) conveys very little in the way of intellect, all that elevates him is that most of the other characters have been made open-mouthed gapers, presumable halfwits. Wit is barred out anyway by the color-palette, all various hues of mud - the surest sign of high-serious intentions in movies nowadays. In exterior shots the sky is overexposed so it shows as a gleamless white blur; the earth is dun-colored, greens are gray-tinged, and reds are virtually absent, on their rare appearance tending to brown, like bloodstained linens oxidizing. The cut of the men's clothing updates the story to several decades after Goethe's time: trousers are worn, rather than breeches and hose. The fabrics are thick, heavy, coarse, and of course dark-dyed and fraying badly. No one could think of playing the dandy here. Strangely, there seems to be no Republic of Letters either. The few characters with intellectual interests neither write nor receive letters; they're isolated from enlightenment and worldly affairs: no one awaits the postman; no one looks at a journal of science or politics or the arts - this is a stupefying omission, as false to the historical period as it would be to Goethe's own. Sokurov's flight from historical particulars strands his Faust: the fable and the character become "timeless" in all the wrong ways. Faust doesn't represent his age's high hopes, or its seeds of self-destruction; but then he doesn't represent our age either. Sealed off in its remoteness, Sokurov's "Faust" is just another - all-too-familiar - sulking, glooming art-house reverie.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

Russia

Language:

German

Release Date:

15 November 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Faust See more »

Filming Locations:

Czech Republic See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

EUR8,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,030, 17 November 2013

Gross USA:

$58,132

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$58,132
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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