6.8/10
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133 user 214 critic

Fair Game (2010)

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CIA operative Valerie Plame discovers her identity is allegedly leaked by the government as payback for an op-ed article her husband wrote criticizing the Bush administration.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Valerie Plame
Sonya Davison ... Chanel Suit
Vanessa Chong ... Tabir Secretary #1
... Hafiz
Stephanie Chai ... Tabir Secretary #2
... Joe Wilson
... Fred
... Sue
... Steve
... Lisa
... Diana
... Jeff
... Samantha Wilson
Quinn Broggy ... Trevor Wilson
... CIA Tour Leader
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Storyline

Plame's status as a CIA agent was revealed by White House officials allegedly out to discredit her husband after he wrote a 2003 New York Times op-ed piece saying that the Bush administration had manipulated intelligence about weapons of mass destruction to justify the invasion of Iraq. Written by anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Inspired by true events. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

3 December 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Untitled Plame and Wilson Biopic  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$22,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$651,802, 7 November 2010, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$9,528,092, 13 February 2011
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Technical Specs

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2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This political-espionage drama was directed by director Doug Liman who had previously directed such action-espionage movies as Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005) and The Bourne Identity (2002). See more »

Goofs

When Valerie is leaving the house, she tells her husband that it is 3:45 in the morning, however when she opens the door, it is clearly daytime. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Valerie Plame: [arriving at Kuala Lumpur airport] Jessica McDowell, Gnosos Chemicals.
Chanel Suit: [on elevator] When do you leave Kuala Lumpur, Miss McDowell?
Valerie Plame: I fly to Taiwan Tuesday, then back to Düsseldorf.
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Crazy Credits

In the closing credits, the last names of some of the characters (Hafiz, Jack, Bill, Dr. Zahraa, Paul, Ali, Hammad, Beth and Pete) are redacted. See more »

Connections

References SpongeBob SquarePants (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Diaraby Magni (Yossi Fine as Radiks Remix)
Written and Performed by Vieux Farka Touré
Courtesy of Six Degrees Records
By Arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Redressing a small but nasty piece of political bastardry
9 January 2011 | by See all my reviews

In retrospect, the George "Dubyah" Bush administration seems to have been more incompetent than evil, but this movie holds the Bushies to account for what was a completely malicious and unjustified act, the outing of the covert CIA operative Valerie Plame, which put numerous undercover operations and informants at risk, solely because her husband former Ambassador Joe Wilson IV had the temerity to dissent publicly from the White House line that the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein had tried to buy uranium from Niger for bomb-making purposes. It is also evident that the CIA's soundly based advice that Saddam's bomb-making activities had ceased after the first Gulf War in 1991 was studiously ignored by the White House in the run-up to the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

The actual leaker, Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage got away scot-free, a crucial matter not discussed in the film , but "Scooter" Libby, Vice President Chaney's chief of staff carried the can and nearly spent 30 months inside for lying to investigators before being pardoned by the President. The film focuses on Libby and implies he was the leaker, acting with the knowledge of Karl Rove, the man who described Valerie Plame as "fair game", and Vice President Cheney.

Director Doug Liman is best known as a producer of thrillers ("Bourne Ultimation" etc) but here he and the Butterworths (Jez and John Henry) as scriptwriters have focused not only on the political intrigue but also the effect the Bushies' bastardry had on Joe and Valerie's personal lives. This gives some great acting possibilities to Sean Penn as Joe and our very own Naomi Watts as Valerie, and they both rise to the occasion, although Sean Penn might be a little self-righteous for some tastes. The personal impact aside, what the leakers did was a good deal worse than anything Julian Assange has done, and it is ironic that some of the conservative commentators who tried to discredit Joe and Valerie are now in the front line of those attacking the Wikileaks founder.

Regardless of the politics, this movie is entertaining enough to pass the watch test despite some dodgy hand-held photography. Near the end Valerie has a meeting with a very senior CIA officer glimpsed earlier, on a park bench in front of the White House. This man, played by Bruce McGill, bears a remarkable physical resemblance to the then director of the CIA, George Tenet. He warns her that she and Joe are up against the most powerful men in the world and asks her to stay silent for the sake of the agency. Valerie points out the agency won't even give her family any protection against death threats, to which Tenet, if that's who it's meant to be, merely shrugs his shoulders. What are the film makers trying to say here - that the agency doesn't look after its own?

Both Joe Wilson and Valerie Plame were patriots and, I believe, from Republican backgrounds. This did not bother the leakers who clearly couldn't care less who they hurt in the propaganda battle over the Iraqi invasion they were determined to launch. This film is based on two books by Joe and Valerie so I suppose it is a somewhat partisan account. Nevertheless it is hard to imagine a film treatment justifying what was done to them. George Bush in his memoirs mentions the Libby pardon issue but is otherwise silent on who did what. Never mind, his place in history as one of the lesser presidents is assured.


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