Monk (2002–2009)
9.0/10
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7 user

Mr. Monk and the Kid 

A severed finger turns up in the park, and Monk's only source of information is the two-year-old boy who found the finger.

Director:

Andre Belgrader (as Andrei Belgrader)

Writers:

Andy Breckman (created by), Tom Scharpling | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Tony Shalhoub ... Adrian Monk
Traylor Howard ... Natalie Teeger
Jason Gray-Stanford ... Randall Disher
Ted Levine ... Stottlemeyer
Brooke Adams ... Abigail Carlyle
Nicole Sullivan ... Janet Novak
Michael A. Goorjian ... Jacob Carlyle (as Michael Goorjian)
Mary Mara ... Theresa Crane
Cleo King ... 911 Operator
Liesl Ehardt ... Diner Waitress
Emmy Clarke ... Julie Teeger
Daniel Quinn ... Raymond Novak
Preston Shores Preston Shores ... Tommy Grazer
Trevor Shores Trevor Shores ... Tommy Grazer
Stanley Kamel ... Dr. Kroger
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Storyline

A severed finger turns up in the park, and Monk's only source of information is the two-year-old boy who found the finger.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

pay phone | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 March 2005 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16 : 9
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first of two episodes that star a married couple with the last name "Novak". The next would be James & Melissa Novak in Monk: Mr. Monk's 100th Case (2008)(#7.7), which also featured Brooke Adams. See more »

Goofs

In the opening scene, as the policeman approaches the small child he is not wearing a glove, but as he takes the finger from the boy, he suddenly is. See more »

Quotes

[talking Monk through a diaper change]
911 Operator: Now on either side of the diaper, there should be two Velcro straps.
Adrian Monk: Yes, okay, I've got the straps.
911 Operator: Now rip 'em open.
[sound of Velcro ripping]
Adrian Monk: Oh! Oooohhh! Oh, my God! Oh, the humanity!
See more »

Connections

References Hindenburg Disaster Newsreel Footage (1937) See more »

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User Reviews

 
The case of the little boy and the human finger
3 August 2017 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

'Monk' has always been one of my most watched shows when needing comfort, to relax after a hard day, a good laugh or a way to spend a lazy weekend.

Not many television episodes make me laugh and cry in the same episode, at least not in recent memory and in general actually there are fairly few. There are episodes and films that make me laugh, others that make me cry, but at the same time and in the same episode/film? Not always. "Mr Monk and the Kid" did exactly that and is one of the strongest ever examples of that being the case with me. It is not just an exceptional episode and one of the best episodes of Season 3 and 'Monk' in general, but it is also a special one.

What makes "Mr Monk and the Kid" so special? It's the rapport between Monk and Tommy. It was so sweetly charming and incredibly touching, Tony Shalhoub shows one of the best examples of an actor working with child actors (which is not an easy feat and hasn't always been achieved), there is a real natural-ness in their scenes, and the twins who play Tommy Preston and Trevor Shores are wholly believable being adorable and affecting.

Natalie, Stottlemeyer and particularly Disher don't have as much to do, but it wasn't a problem to me. They work well within the episode and are well acted. Ted Levine's Stottlemeyer has always been one of the best things about 'Monk', that hasn't changed. Disher is a bit bland but isn't in the episode enough to make it a flaw and it is not distracting. Natalie is settling in well in her best episode yet at this point, her chemistry with Monk is sparkling even more, her personality is starting to become more differentiated and more interesting, she's useful and the two characters function very well together. She has a down-to-earth-ness, sensitivity and sass that makes one warm to her as well as being more sympathetic to Monk's issues. Traylor Howard is doing just fine.

As said many times, one of the best things about 'Monk' has always been the acting of Tony Shalhoub in the title role. It was essential for him to work and be the glue of the show, and Shalhoub not only is that but also at his very best he IS the show. Have always loved the balance of the humour, which is often hilarious, and pathos, which is sincere and touching.

It's not just the cast or story though. Another star is the writing, which is also essential to whether the show would be successful or not and succeed it does here. The mix of hilarious wry humour, lovable quirkiness and tender easy-to-relate-to drama is delicately done. The quirks are sympathetically done and never exploited or overdone.

Regarding the character moments, they are particularly strong here. Loved the similarities Tommy has to Monk. The 911 operator scene had me falling me off the chair and nearly rolling about on the floor laughing, a hilarious scene and one of the funniest on 'Monk' easily. As for the touching moments, the standout is definitely the heart-breaking ending that had me bawling, it was clear what the outcome was going to be but it was so tenderly acted and written that that was overlooked entirely.

With the mystery, it's not as memorable as the character moments and the "who"-dunnit element is fairly obvious and easy to narrow down. The "how" and particularly "why" were a complete surprise though. The story-book summation was very clever, a very memorable denouement certainly, and it looks good on screen. Also liked that the crime itself was not entirely known straight away, with the severed finger having one than one thing.

Visually, the episode is shot in a slick and stylish way, and the music is both understated and quirky. While there is a preference for the theme music for Season 1, Randy Newman's "It's a Jungle Out There" has grown on me overtime, found it annoying at first but appreciate its meaning and what it's trying to say much more now. Oh and a good job is done with the different opening credits sequence to accommodate the changes made.

Overall, simply brilliant and a show highlight. 10/10 Bethany Cox


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