7.1/10
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Fuck (2005)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 10 November 2007 (Japan)
Trailer
2:05 | Trailer

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A documentary on the expletive's origin, why it offends some people so deeply, and what can be gained from its use.

Director:

Steve Anderson

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Reinhold Aman Reinhold Aman ... Himself
Steven Bochco ... Himself
Pat Boone ... Himself
Benjamin C. Bradlee ... Himself (as Ben Bradlee)
Drew Carey ... Himself
Chuck D ... Himself
Billy Connolly ... Himself
John Crossley John Crossley ... Himself
Sam Donaldson ... Himself
Janeane Garofalo ... Herself
Ice-T ... Himself
Timothy Jay Timothy Jay ... Himself
Ron Jeremy ... Himself
Alan Keyes Alan Keyes ... Himself
Janet LaRue Janet LaRue ... Herself
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Storyline

This documentary takes a look on all sides of the infamous F-word. It's taboo,obscene and controversial, yet somehow seems to permeate every single aspect of our culture - from Hollywood, to the schoolyard to the Senate floor in Washington D.C. It's the word at the very center of the debate on Free Speech - and everyone seems to have an opinion. FUCK exams how the word is impacting our world today through interviews, film and television clips, music, and original animation by Bill Plympton. Scholars and linguists examine the long history of fuck. Comedians, actors, and writers who have charted and popularized the upward course of fuck are heard from, often while defending the Constitutional Right of Free Speech, all the way to the Supreme Court. FUCK visits with those who actually fuck for a living. We hear from advocates who oppose fuck and its infringement into our everyday lives. We watch some of the most famous and infamous film and television clips that feature fuck, we hear some... Written by GD

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A f*ckumentary film by Steve Anderson See more »

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 November 2007 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

F*ck See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,299, 12 November 2006, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$19,791, 10 December 2006
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to this documentary, the first major Hollywood film to use the word "fuck" was MASH (1970), while some of the more profane films since have been Scarface (1983) which uses it 182 times, Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001) which has 228 examples and the first season of Deadwood (2004) which racks up 861 utterances in its first season alone. See more »

Goofs

Onscreen text indicates the first movie to use the word "fuck" was _"M*A*S*H" (1972-1983)_ . This was the title of the television series. The movie was entitled MASH. See more »

Quotes

Janeane Garofalo: Would you like to have sexual congress with my vagina?
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Crazy Credits

A Very Special Double Fuck You To ... Cancer A Very Special Fuck You To ... Steven N. Kurtz A Special Fuck You To ... Carlo Cavagna George Parker Steve Bickel M. Muzatko C. Martin Shawn Levy Sean Mantooth Dr. Manwaring Dr. Wong Brett Doyle Terry Fisher Brian Moss Tony Sodano Chris Sorenson Dan Dye Adam Sampson Bob "Pork-it" Loftstrom See more »

Connections

Features Woodstock (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Revolution Starts Now
Written and Performed by Steve Earle
Courtesy of E-Squared
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
As In: "Sometimes, You Just Gotta Say 'What The...'"
24 August 2007 | by cchaseSee all my reviews

This might be the first time I've ever written a review, where I actually have to self-censor the title of the movie. Although it's not a word that most of us use every day (or sometimes every week, for that matter), director Steve Anderson provides us with a funny and fascinating examination of the "F-word" - its uses (it's an extremely versatile word, you know), its possible origins, and just exactly why it's considered the most controversial and profane utterance in the English language. (Although I would have to agree with one of the film's participants, and rate it the SECOND most controversial. I always thought the first one was that 'C-word' that most women don't even call each other, unless they're REALLY angry.)

But more interesting than the subject is the roster of celebrities, writers and pundits who show up for the chance to yak it up, and how their individual views on not just the word but the world-at-large make this an interesting study about people as well. Besides being sprinkled throughout with the droll and delirious animation of Bill Plympton, highlights for me include Janeane Garofalo, Ron Jeremy (who seems a lot more intelligent and well-spoken than you'd think), the late Hunter S. Thompson and clips of comedian/heroic free-speech advocate Lenny Bruce (and what would this doc be without him?), Billy Connolly, Ice-T and yes, really - Pat Boone. There's something profoundly sad to me about his segment, but I'll let you see if you can pick out what it is (someone else in the doc certainly does.)

Surprisingly enough, the film is nearly evenly balanced by the representation on the conservative side, as interviews are also conducted with several "leading lights of the right", which include "Miss Manners" and Alan Keyes (who frankly made me want to punch him out every time he came on-screen.) The relative humorlessness with which they all seem to approach the subject seems reflective of the way in which they view everything, and it sharply delineates the differences between "Righties" and "Lefties" in a way that most political debates never will.

Not as outright obscene (as you'd expect) or as fall-down funny as its more profane cousin, THE ARISTOCRATS, F**K is still definitely worth your time. And thank goodness we still live in a society where it's not a crime to watch or discuss it.


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