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The Blind Swordsman: Zatoichi (2003)

Zatôichi (original title)
The blind masseur/swordsman comes to a town in control of warring gangs, and while bunking with a farming family, he meets two women with their own agenda.

Director:

Takeshi Kitano

Writers:

Takeshi Kitano (screenplay), Kan Shimozawa (novels)
24 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Takeshi Kitano ... Zatôichi / Ichi (as Beat Takeshi)
Tadanobu Asano ... Hattori Genosuke
Michiyo Yasuda ... Aunt Oume (as Michiyo Ohkusu)
Taka Guadalcanal Taka Guadalcanal ... Shinkichi
Daigorô Tachibana Daigorô Tachibana ... Geisha Seitaro 'Osei' Naruto
Yûko Daike ... Geisha Okinu Naruto
Yui Natsukawa ... O-Shino, Hattori's Wife
Ittoku Kishibe Ittoku Kishibe ... Boss Inosuke Ginzo
Saburô Ishikura Saburô Ishikura ... Boss Tashichi Ogi
Akira Emoto Akira Emoto ... Tavern Owner Pops
Ben Hiura Ben Hiura ... Tavern Gramps
Kohji Miura Kohji Miura ... Lord Sakai
Hideboh Hideboh ... Dancing Farmer (as The Stripes)
Ron II Ron II ... Dancing Farmer (as The Stripes)
Suji Suji ... Dancing Farmer (as The Stripes)
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Storyline

Blind Zatoichi makes his living by gambling and giving massages. But behind his humble facade, Zatoichi is a master swordsman, gifted with lightning-fast draw and strokes of breathtaking precision. Zatoichi wanders into a town run by sinister gangs and a powerful samurai. He's destined for violent showdowns when he stumbles on two beautiful geishas avenging their parents' murder... Duels, wit and a touch of zen! Cult anti-hero Zatoichi is back in a sword-fighting adventure written, directed and starring Takeshi Kitano. Written by intlpress@aol.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

His Sword Made Him a Hero... His Courage Made Him a Legend. This Summer, Justice is Blind.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong stylized bloody violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kitano said that he wanted the fights to be as realistic as possible, but that he wanted the blood to be extremely exaggerated. See more »

Quotes

Shinkichi: Massuer, did you see that?
Zatôichi: I don't see much
See more »

Connections

Featured in Denn sie kennen kein Erbarmen - Der Italowestern (2006) See more »

User Reviews

 
They don't make 'em like this anymore...oh wait!
29 March 2005 | by The_VoidSee all my reviews

Takeshi Kitano's offbeat samurai drama marks a personal triumph for the man himself and a notable entry for the genre. Kitano directs and stars as the blind samurai of Japanese pulp fiction; Zatôichi. He puts in a grand performance and really brings the character to life. His direction is superb also, and he succeeds in creating a foreboding and tension filled atmosphere that also captures the familiar Kurosawa-esque feel of the classic samurai movies. The story follows the fate of blind samurai master: Zatôichi. This master doesn't let a small thing like losing his sight get in the way, and in spite of being blind, the master is still the fastest man with a sword; as he proves on a number of occasions. The first thing you will notice about the fight scenes in this movie is that they are bloodthirsty! That's no bad thing, of course, especially since the second thing you will notice is that there's lots of them. The fight sequences are definitely the highlight of the movie, and they include some highlights in themselves; as we watch in delight as limbs fly and people get sliced and diced! The fights in this film make the likes of Kill Bill look even more ridiculous than it does already.

Takeshi Kitano creates his own world for the characters in the movie to inhabit, and he also seems keen to incorporate as many elements as possible into the plot, which is good in one way as it ensures that the movie is always intriguing and interesting, but it does get a little convoluted and, at times, makes you think "what's that there for?!". Still, the film does offer lots of interesting little tidbits, and it never gets so convoluted that it becomes boring. Well, it can't do; there's always another fight scene round the corner! The film is artistically played throughout, and you get the impression that Kitano has an obvious respect for the art of cinema, which is certainly no bad thing at all. Even though the plot is very familiar, and anyone that's seen more than a couple of samurai movies will have seen one with a plot like this one has; it's inventive enough to carve out a niche of it's own, and it draws it's originality from that fact. On the whole, this isn't a great samurai movie like the ones of yore; but it's encouraging that films like this are still being made, and it's easily one of the best movies of 2003. Recommended viewing!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

6 September 2003 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

The Blind Swordsman: Zatoichi See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$61,104, 25 July 2004

Gross USA:

$1,118,163

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$34,196,922
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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