6.8/10
31,812
102 user 33 critic

Private Parts (1997)

The autobiographical story of Howard Stern, the radio rebel who is now also a TV personality, an author and a movie star.

Director:

Betty Thomas

Writers:

Howard Stern (book), Len Blum (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Howard Stern ... Himself
Robin Quivers ... Robin Quivers
Mary McCormack ... Alison Stern
Fred Norris ... Fred Norris
Paul Giamatti ... Kenny
Gary Dell'Abate ... Gary Dell'Abate
Jackie Martling ... Jackie Martling
Carol Alt ... Gloria
Richard Portnow ... Ben Stern
Kelly Bishop ... Ray Stern
Henry Goodman ... Moti
Jonathan Hadary ... Griff
Paul Hecht Paul Hecht ... Ross Buckingham
Allison Janney ... Dee Dee
Michael Murphy ... Roger Erlick
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Storyline

Having always wanted to be a disc-jockey, Howard Stern works his way painfully from radio at his 1970's college to a Detroit station. It is with a move to Washington that he hits on an outrageous off-the-wall style that catches audience attention. Despite his on-air blue talk, at home he is a loving husband. He needs all the support he can get when he joins NBC in New York and comes up against a very different vision of radio. Written by Jeremy Perkins <jwp@aber.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

He turned on everyone who tuned in! See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, nudity and crude sexual humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 March 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Howard Stern's Private Parts See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$14,616,333, 9 March 1997, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$41,198,146, 8 June 1997
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In his final monologue, Kenny Rushton states that he is no longer working in radio and works as a manager of a shopping mall. In real life, Kevin Metheny, whom Kenny is based on, worked in radio until his death in 2014. See more »

Goofs

When Kenny "hits himself" with the phone during the fight scene with Howard, he gets a bloody nose. When the camera cuts and shows him yelling at Howard, the blood disappears. See more »

Quotes

[after seeing Howard in his Fartman oufit]
Ozzy Osbourne: What a fucking jerk.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Kenny talks about his life after Howard, which eventually becomes a rant about how horrible Howard is. See more »

Alternate Versions

A leaked workprint version is available for sale on the internet which features deleted scenes, alternate takes, and different music. It also has a completely different voiceover narration by Howard Stern throughout. Major differences include:
  • John Stamos kneels and grabs "Fartman"'s behind recreating what 'Luke Perry' did in real life.
  • Camille Grammer takes off her bikini top after she initially refuses.
  • A much longer shot of Howard imagining Gloria in her bra. Her breasts do not enlarge in this version.
  • Instead of Howard doing a goofy dance to Ramones' "Pinhead", he does a bad reading of a sponsor's commercial.
  • Howard goes to Allison's job and tells her that they are moving to Hartford. In the film, a clip of this scene is shown as being Allison's new job in Hartford.
  • Gary Dell'Abate's vignettes with Crackhead Bob and Nicole Bass are not included.
  • Howard is shown hiding his wet underwear under his car's seat. This explains how Allison finds them there.
  • Howard performs a different poem as "Mama Look A Boo Boo Day".
  • Howard tries to record a bit in his Detroit apartment then a bullet comes through his wall.
  • The entire montage of Howard alone in Detroit set to Jimi Hendrix's "All Along the Watchtower" does not appear.
  • Howard calls Allison and begs her to come to Detroit. This is shown very briefly during the montage in the film.
  • Howard stages a rally in which he gets women to burn their bras.
  • Gary's vignette in Washington, D.C. is not included.
  • A much shorter version of Howard and Robin's first show together.
  • Robin Quivers's interview is not included.
  • The montage of Howard in the streets of Washington, D.C. set to Van Halen's "You Really Got Me" is not included.
  • A longer version of the lesbian sex story in which they are both topless.
  • Howard, Robin, and Fred run from a mob of adoring fans.
  • The meeting at NBC Headquarters in which they discuss hiring Howard is not included.
  • Kim Chan's appearance as a waiter is not included.
  • The vignette with Gary and a donkey is not included.
  • During his victory rally, Howard encourages the crowd put up their middle fingers and yell "Screw NBC!"
  • Howard and the gang announce a segment called "Bestiality Dial-A-Date" which offends a group of elderly stockholders listening to the show. The stockholders call Erlick who then calls Vallesecca. As Howard is leaving the studio, Vallesecca fires Howard and has security escort him out of the building. A clip of this was shown in the trailer.
  • A video montage in which Howard describes what happened to him and his show after he was fired. This leads to the scene of Howard falling at the Oscars which turns out to be Howard's nightmare.
  • John Melendez's scene is not included.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Whitney: Private Parts (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Tired of Waiting For You
Written by Ray Davies
Performed by Green Day
Courtesy of Reprise Records
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products
See more »

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User Reviews

A little one-sided in it's story telling but it's all very funny
11 January 2002 | by bob the mooSee all my reviews

The true story of Howard Stern's "rise" from schoolboy nerd to leading DJ in the USA. This is adapted from his book and is a whirlwind ride through 30 years, with the main focus being on his career at small stations and his big break at NBC. The fact that it is from Stern himself means that the story focuses on his good sides and tends to brush over the more difficult issues relating to his insensitivity towards his wife etc, but that doesn't stop this being a funny enjoyable film.

Stern plays himself with a great sense of self - most of his jokes put himself down rather than being arrogant. This helps endear the audience to him with great effect and makes him more sympathetic. The comedy is very sharp (and rude) throughout and even if we don't get any great insights at least we have a good laugh.

Stern is good in the lead role (admittedly if he can't play himself what can he do!) And his colleagues are also good as themselves. Paul Giamatti is great as the put upon producer at NBC and the rest of the cast is filled out with weird characters. One complaint would be the copious amount of nudity in the film - I realise that it's a true story but it did seem to be put in just to get the audience at times (well....like Stern's show itself I guess).

Overall this plays like a rude Woody Allen film (funny narrative voice-overs) and it has a certain charm to it that towers over the smuttiness to make it feel a much nicer film than it is. Even if you don't know who Stern is (i.e. most people outside of America) this is a very funny enjoyable film.


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