A young policewoman slowly goes insane while tracking down an elusive serial rapist/killer through Italy when she herself becomes a victim of the brutal man's obsession.

Director:

Dario Argento

Writers:

Graziella Magherini (novel), Dario Argento (story) | 2 more credits »
1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Asia Argento ... Det. Anna Manni
Thomas Kretschmann ... Alfredo Grossi
Marco Leonardi ... Marco Longhi
Luigi Diberti ... Insp. Manetti
Paolo Bonacelli ... Dr. Cavanna
Julien Lambroschini Julien Lambroschini ... Marie
John Quentin John Quentin ... Anna's father
Franco Diogene ... Victim's husband
Lucia Stara Lucia Stara ... Shop assistant
Sonia Topazio Sonia Topazio ... Victim in Florence
Lorenzo Crespi ... Giulio
Vera Gemma Vera Gemma ... Policewoman
John Pedeferri John Pedeferri ... Hydraulic engineer
Veronica Lazar ... Marie's mother
Mario Diano Mario Diano ... Coroner
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Storyline

Anna Manni is a policewoman trying to capture a vicious serial rapist and killer. The problem is that she suffers from "Stendhal's syndrome", a psychosomatic disease that gives her dizziness and hallucinations when she is exposed to the sight of paintings and artistic masterpieces. When the maniac lures her into a trap inside Florence's famous Uffizi museum, her troubles are just beginning... Written by Giancarlo Cairella <vertigo@imdb.com>

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Taglines:

Is it art or the vilest perversion ever filmed? See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

T. Kretschmann (playing killer, rapist, Alfredo Grossi) said on set: "Dario has let me use my fantasies." e.g. that the attack, sucking on the gun barrel was his improvisation idea, which director Argento initially disliked: "He wasn't keen on the gun blow-job at first, but I won him around." [interview; 'Cinefantastique' magazine; April '96.] See more »

Goofs

Though featuring prominently during the film's opening sequence set at the Uffizi in Florecne, Peter Bruegel's 'Landscape with the Fall of Icarus' is actually housed at the Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels. See more »

Quotes

Insp. Manetti: You're young. I can trust you.
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Alternate Versions

US DVD release by Troma release is the complete version of the English language edition, but, like all English releases, is still missing around 2 minutes of material exclusive to the Italian print. See more »

User Reviews

 
Argento breaks formula at last
11 October 2000 | by ShinwaSee all my reviews

Definitely heady stuff from a filmmaker whose prior experience with psychological subtext has been problematic at best, this film highlights a fearless performance by Asia Argento. The obvious "Argento touches" (i.e., pills rattling down an esophagus, the bullet through a woman's face) stick out like a sore thumb, as they act not in service to the story but rather to reference what is expected from Argento; after the catastrophe of Trauma (Argento imitating a hack filmmaker imitating Argento), this film goes in directions that the director's previous films had only hinted at, and doesn't lead to rely on trademarks for a crutch.

The pace of the film is extremely well-handled in the first half, although it seems to lose track in the second half exactly where the narrative should be tightening up. But given Argento's lack of experience with more plot-driven material, this is in some measure to be expected. Cinematography, sets, art direction are all exemplary.

The acting is always a sore point for Argento movies. Here, only a couple of actors are allowed to give performances, but they make them count. Thomas Kretschmann is only on screen a few times, but gives a strong enough impression in that time (and not simply because of the brutal material contained there) that his role seems much larger. However, the film lives or dies with Asia's performance, and she throws herself into it with abandon. She's ultimately more convincing when she's required to be fierce than when she's required to be vulnerable, but goes through a bewildering range of emotions with scarcely a false note. And it's to her credit that it's so unsettling watching the torments her father subjects her to, so to speak, because she commits herself to their realization so thoroughly.

Comparing this to films from Argento's peak period is not really applicable...it comes from an entirely different vein. Which makes it all the more depressing that his next movie would be Il Fantasma dell'Opera, easily his worst.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Troma

Country:

Italy

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

26 January 1996 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

The Stendhal Syndrome See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,800,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Medusa Film, Cine 2000 See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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