After seventeen years, a fiercely independent woman and her rebellious son return home and together they turn the family she left behind upside down.

Director:

Jerry Zaks

Writers:

Scott McPherson (play), Scott McPherson (screenplay)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Meryl Streep ... Lee
Leonardo DiCaprio ... Hank
Diane Keaton ... Bessie
Robert De Niro ... Dr. Wally
Hume Cronyn ... Marvin
Gwen Verdon ... Ruth
Hal Scardino ... Charlie
Dan Hedaya ... Bob
Margo Martindale ... Dr. Charlotte
Cynthia Nixon ... Retirement Home Director
Kelly Ripa ... Coral
John Callahan ... Lance
Olga Merediz ... Beauty Shop Lady
Joe Lisi ... Bruno
Steve DuMouchel ... Gas Station Guy (as Steve Dumouchel)
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Storyline

Years ago, the fiercely independent Lee took off for Ohio, while her older sister Bessie stayed home to look after their bedridden father, Marvin. Lee has troubles of her own, including her mischievous son Hank, who has a knack for burning down the neighborhood when she's not looking. Seventeen years since her last visit, and after an unexpected call from Bessie, Lee's packs up Hank and his younger brother Charlie for the trip home.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Open your heart. There's room. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Hank takes the car on his own, he is driving westbound on state road 528 between Merritt island and Cocoa Florida heading towards the bridge on the Indian River. See more »

Goofs

When Hank and Charlie are meeting Aunt Ruth for the first time, when the camera angle is looking out from the garage, when Aunt Ruth says the line "Now which of you fine boys is in the mental institution?" you can seem the boom mic in between Hank, Charlie and Bessie to the left and Aunt Ruth and Lee to the right. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Bessie: Uh, Janine, I wonder if you could tell me how long I might have to wait, because I left Aunt Ruth at home in charge of dad, and...
Janine: You'll have to see Doctor Wally, because Doctor Serrot is on vacation.
[finishes typing "I quit" letter]
Bessie: See "Doctor who"?
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Crazy Credits

The producers wish to thank ... the staff and guests of Walt Disney World Magic Kingdom, Orlando Florida, ... the residents and staff of The Florida Manor Nursing Home ... See more »

Connections

Referenced in Saturday Night Live: Rob Lowe/Spice Girls (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo
Written by Fred Gilbert (uncredited) and Roy Wooten
Courtesy of Associated Production Music
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User Reviews

 
The screenplay is really the star of this film.
15 January 2005 | by xavrush89See all my reviews

It's such a wonderful story, not at all as dreary as one would expect. The late Scott McPherson injected so much humor and heart into this film, it's hard not to just go along with it. Diane Keaton got the Oscar nomination, but Meryl Streep's character drives the film, as she works her way back into a family she turned her back on so she could have a life of her own. She was right to do so, as her sister (Keaton) has become consumed with caregiving for her father and aunt, taking absolutely no time out for herself. The film also features a nice departure for Robert De Niro from his typically heavy roles. That alone is worth seeing, and fans of his typical performances should be forced to watch this.

This quiet film may not have enough action for some, but it is far better than most films dealing with serious illness. The journey these sisters begin is something that has been explored in countless TV movies (think Lifetime), but what separates it is the humor and the character development that makes the viewer wish he/she could stay and watch the family long after the film ends. The film also benefits from the presence of Leonardo DiCaprio, who gives an unlikely nuanced performance as the older son who develops some character and helps his flighty mother grow along with him. The great thing about his presence in the film is that younger viewers (mostly female, probably) will be more likely to see this movie and get something out of it in the process.

Finally, a word about Gwen Verdon and Hume Cronyn. Their contributions to this film are immeasurable. And as already mentioned, it's great that younger viewers can watch this film and get a last look at them in these touching roles and see how charm never fades with age. Cronyn has little to do but lie ill in bed, yet somehow his character remains a focal point. And Verdon's comic relief pairing with the younger son is a real highlight. She also manages a poignant moment or two in a her scenes with Keaton. This truly is an ensemble piece, and it wouldn't have been without their talent. Why I don't yet own a copy of this sweet film is a mystery.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 February 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Marvin's Room See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$23,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$57,739, 22 December 1996

Gross USA:

$12,803,305

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$12,803,305
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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