5.3/10
5,752
72 user 30 critic

Revolution (1985)

A trapper and his young son get pulled into the American revolution early as unwilling participants and remain involved through to the end.

Director:

Hugh Hudson

Writer:

Robert Dillon
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1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Al Pacino ... Tom Dobb
Donald Sutherland ... Sgt. Maj. Peasy
Nastassja Kinski ... Daisy McConnahay
Joan Plowright ... Mrs. McConnahay
Dave King ... Mr. McConnahay
Steven Berkoff ... Sgt. Jones
John Wells John Wells ... Corty
Annie Lennox ... Liberty Woman
Dexter Fletcher ... Ned Dobb
Sid Owen Sid Owen ... Young Ned
Richard O'Brien ... Lord Hampton
Paul Brooke ... Lord Darling
Eric Milota Eric Milota ... Merle
Felicity Dean ... Betsy
Jo Anna Lee Jo Anna Lee ... Amy
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Storyline

New York trapper Tom Dobb becomes an unwilling participant in the American Revolution after his young son Ned is conscripted into the British Army as a drummer by the villainous Sergeant Major Peasy. Tom attempts to find his son, and eventually becomes convinced that he must take a stand and fight for the freedom of the Colonies. He crosses path with the aristocratic rebel Daisy McConnahay who gets involved in the support of the American troops. As Tom undergoes his change of heart, the events of the war unfold in large-scale grandeur. Written by William Agee <wa0521@broncho.ucok.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The war that won a nation its freedom, a young woman her destiny, a young man his independence, and a father his son's love. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for war violence and related images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | Norway

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 December 1985 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Revolution 1776 See more »

Filming Locations:

Norway See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$52,755, 29 December 1985, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$358,574
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Director's Cut)

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Hugh Hudson, hired the acclaimed war photographer and photojournalist Don McCullin to work on the film as a stills photographer and as an extra. McCullin later described it as an extremely depressing and unhappy experience that he never wanted to repeat. See more »

Goofs

In the battle scene, a caplock musket is visible. The first caplock firing mechanism was not patented until the early 1800s, 20 years after the end of the American Revolution. Caplock firing mechanisms depicted in the film were not in wide use until the 1850s, 70 years after the American Revolution. See more »

Quotes

Offscreen Revolutionary: Get out of here, you Negro!
Offscreen Slave: We want freedom too!
See more »

Alternate Versions

In 2009, Hugh Hudson made his own director's cut titled "Revolution Revisited" which was also released on DVD. The new version featured new narration recorded by , a different ending, and removed 10 minutes of footage from the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in QI: Food (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Lilliburlero
(uncredited)
Traditional
Arranged by Harry Rabinowitz
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Wretched.
5 August 2005 | by jckruizeSee all my reviews

I'm all for the idea of a grand epic of the American Revolutionary War. This ain't it. (And for that matter, neither was the Emmerich/Devlin/Gibson THE PATRIOT. But I digress.)

I saw this film at a publicity screening at the old MGM Studios (now Sony) just before it came out. The audience had high expectations for this expensive period piece, written by veteran Robert Dillon, directed by the esteemed Hugh Hudson (of CHARIOTS OF FIRE fame), and starring Al Pacino.

But it didn't take long for people to start squirming in their seats, whispering derisive comments about Pacino's horribly misconceived accent -- he was supposed to be an American frontiersman of Scottish ancestry(!) -- and that of Nastassja Kinski, who was supposed to be recently emigrated from England(!!). Then the story started and it all went downhill fast.

Motivations were muddled, dialogue was atrocious, events had no historical or political context. What there was of a plot lurched forward on absurd coincidence; by the second or third time that alleged lovers Pacino and Kinski stumbled into each other it had become a bad joke. Donald Sutherland gave an unhinged performance as a British officer/pederast. His accent was all over the map too. I guess there weren't any English actors available.

Lots of people left. Those who stayed tried to stifle giggles, then openly guffawed. I stuck it out -- I figured that at least the battle scenes might be good. I was wrong. Inexplicably, Hudson chose to film them with hand-held cameras, not even Steadicam, the jerkiness giving a misplaced newsreel 'authenticity' which ruined the sense of scale.

There was a semi-famous TV reviewer in the audience a few rows ahead of me: (the late) Gary Franklin of Channel 7 Eyewitness News. I could tell he was peeved by the behavior of the rest of us. And sure enough, on his TV segment the next day he gave the film a '10' on his notorious 'Franklin Scale of 1 to 10', while remarking churlishly about the louts who'd disrupted the screening the night before, who clearly didn't know art when they saw it. What a buffoon.

After this disaster, Pacino didn't star in another film for almost 4 years. Hugh Hudson's career never recovered. You can't say I didn't warn you.


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