6.3/10
12,609
69 user 73 critic

Dreamscape (1984)

A young psychic on the run from himself is recruited by a government agency experimenting with the use of the dream-sharing technology and is given the inverse task of planting an idea into the mind of the U.S. president.

Director:

Joseph Ruben

Writers:

David Loughery (story), David Loughery (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

ON DISC
ALL
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dennis Quaid ... Alex Gardner
Max von Sydow ... Doctor Paul Novotny
Christopher Plummer ... Bob Blair
Eddie Albert ... The President
Kate Capshaw ... Jane DeVries
David Patrick Kelly ... Tommy Ray Glatman
George Wendt ... Charlie Prince
Larry Gelman ... Mr. Webber
Cory 'Bumper' Yothers Cory 'Bumper' Yothers ... Buddy
Redmond Gleeson Redmond Gleeson ... Snead
Peter Jason ... Babcock
Chris Mulkey ... Finch
Jana Taylor Jana Taylor ... Mrs. Webber
Madison Mason ... Fred Schoenstein
Kendall Carly Browne Kendall Carly Browne ... Mrs. Matusik
Edit

Storyline

A government funded project looks into using psychics to enter people's dreams, with some mechanical help. When a subject dies in his sleep from a heart attack Alex Gardner becomes suspicious that another of the psychics is killing people in the dreams somehow and that is causing them to die in real life. He must find a way to stop the abuse of the power to enter dreams. Written by Zaphod <aaa@scs.leeds.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Who in hell has peace of mind..? See more »


Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 August 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El túnel de las pesadillas See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,257,000, 19 August 1984, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$11,484,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Dennis Quaid was the first and only choice for Alex Gardner, after the producers loved his dedication for the role and the project during its pre-production stage. See more »

Goofs

When Ms. Matusik has a heart attack, the paddles used to try and revive her are placed in the wrong spots on her chest. One paddle is supposed to be placed on the upper right of the patient and the other on the lower left at the base of the ribs. This allows for proper current travel through the heart. But both paddles are placed on her upper chest at her shoulders. This would do nothing for the patient. Also, you can see the actor jump before she is "shocked." See more »

Quotes

Tommy Ray Glatman: [Alex turns into Tommy's father] Daddy? Daddy, I'm sorry!
See more »

Alternate Versions

A brief shot of topless nudity from Kate Capshaw during the love sequence on the train with Dennis Quaid was cut from the film in the US in order to secure a PG-13 rating. The scene is uncut in European prints of the movie. The scene is not present on the R1 Image Entertainment Special Edition DVD although the commentary makes reference to nudity in the scene. See more »

Connections

References Enter the Dragon (1973) See more »

Soundtracks

Baby, Can't We Take It Home
Composed and Produced by Craig Huxley (as Craig Hundley)
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Could have been a contender
25 July 2005 | by enricoleperaSee all my reviews

The idea is fantastic. Can you imagine being able to get into other people's dreams, watch them, interact with them. The problem is, the plot is inconclusive and becomes kind of a TV movie along the way. It would make a fantastic remake with a stronger cast and director. However, movies about dreaming are always scary because they touch on something so close and yet inexplicable to all of us. I saw recently a short movie from Italy entitled "Xchange" which is the closest to this one in terms of innovation insofar as the subject is concerned. Not an easy area to tell a long story about. Dreams are often used as omens or hints of psychological discomfort in movies. Instead, it would be great if they could be regarded as something different: a world of their own, a parallel state of mind no less real than real life itself. Someone should redo Dreamscape!


13 of 22 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 69 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed