A computer hacker is abducted into the digital world and forced to participate in gladiatorial games where his only chance of escape is with the help of a heroic security program.

Director:

Steven Lisberger

Writers:

Steven Lisberger (screenplay), Steven Lisberger (story) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
3,253 ( 463)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeff Bridges ... Kevin Flynn / Clu
Bruce Boxleitner ... Alan Bradley / Tron
David Warner ... Ed Dillinger / Sark / Master Control Program
Cindy Morgan ... Lora / Yori
Barnard Hughes ... Dr. Walter Gibbs / Dumont
Dan Shor ... Ram / Popcorn Co-Worker
Peter Jurasik ... Crom
Stuart Thomas Stuart Thomas ... Peter / Sark's Lieutenant (as Tony Stephano)
Craig Chudy Craig Chudy ... Warrior #1
Vince Deadrick Jr. Vince Deadrick Jr. ... Warrior #2 (as Vince Deadrick)
Sam Schatz Sam Schatz ... Expert Disc Warrior
Jackson Bostwick ... Head Guard
David S. Cass Sr. ... Factory Guard (as Dave Cass)
Gerald Berns ... Guard #1
Bob Neill Bob Neill ... Guard #2
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Storyline

Hacker/arcade owner Kevin Flynn is digitally broken down into a data stream by a villainous software pirate known as Master Control and reconstituted into the internal, 3-D graphical world of computers. It is there, in the ultimate blazingly colorful, geometrically intense landscapes of cyberspace, that Flynn joins forces with Tron to outmaneuver the Master Control Program that holds them captive in the equivalent of a gigantic, infinitely challenging computer game. Written by Anthony Pereyra {hypersonic91@yahoo.com}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In the future video game battles will be a matter of life or death. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film inspired a handheld arcade game entitled "Space Turbo" which was manufactured by Tomy and released in 1985. In the game, the player has to speed through the galaxy destroying alien aircrafts by using the joystick control to fire and maneuver. See more »

Goofs

Around the 24-minute mark, in close-up shots of Dillinger behind his desk, what appears to be the top of a crew member's head is visible in the lower right corner of the screen. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Boy in Video Game Arcade: All right, give me room. Here we go.
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Crazy Credits

Certain versions of the European/American re-release have the explanatory title cards establishing the viewer into the world of the Programs and Users. See more »

Alternate Versions

Trailers feature a deleted scene, where Flinn de-rezzes an unknown program on the ring-game with a direct hit. See more »

Connections

Followed by TRON 2.0 (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Only Solutions
Written and Performed by Journey
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User Reviews

 
A Beautiful Film
22 January 2005 | by chris-m-cSee all my reviews

More than just reminiscent of Lang's Metropolis, Tron is a beautiful, well made exercise from a main stream producer (Disney) which reminds us of the time before Jurassic Park and Episode One where creative skill was left to human perception rather than a computer's digitally correct ideal. Owing more to the human colourists than the now outdated computer effects, this film is evidence - similar in a way to Kubric's pre-Moon landing, pre-CGI 2001 - to the creative and more sensory-pleasing abilities of the human artist over soul-less programmers, from a time before when a box would 'parse' it all for you. It's difficult to express how high-powered computers fail to create an image that is satisfactory to the human eye; there is always something that rings false about it. Tron was created in a period of wire diagrams being the best you could coax from a computer; anything else was added by human hand. A film that makes you nostalgic for the time when Disney made films that were accessible for all, almost Bakshi-like in its disregard for the mainstream. There is struggle against adversity; there is an oppressive, evil regime; there are two heroes who survive despite all odds; and there is love conquering all (a token woman is included as love interest. Ironically like the IT industry). The naive use of technical jargon merely adds to the "computer program" style setting and this film is ideally suited for today's retro-chic society. As a Disney film this is aimed predominantly at children, so if you fail to understand the plot then I would recommend sticking to the Lion King or some other pabulum. This is a great film - watch it.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 July 1982 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

TRON: The Original Classic See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,761,795, 11 July 1982

Gross USA:

$33,000,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$33,000,525
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
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