7.8/10
22,202
153 user 92 critic

All That Jazz (1979)

Director/choreographer Bob Fosse tells his own life story as he details the sordid life of Joe Gideon, a womanizing, drug-using dancer.

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Won 4 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Erzsebet Foldi ...
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Dr. Ballinger
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William LeMassena ...
Irene Kane ...
Leslie Perry (as Chris Chase)
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Kathryn Doby ...
Kathryn
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Robert Hitt ...
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Storyline

Choreographing and picking dancers for his current show whilst editing his feature film about a stand-up comedian is getting to Joe Gideon. Without the chemical substances, he would not have the energy to keep up with his girlfriend, his ex-wife, and his special dancing daughter. They attempt to bring him back from the brink, but it's too late for his exhausted body and stress-ravaged heart. He chain-smokes, uses drugs, sleeps with his dancers and overworks himself into open-heart surgery. Scenes from his past life start to encroach on the present and he becomes increasingly aware of his mortality. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Prepare yourself for all that acclaim... See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music | Musical

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

20 December 1979 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Hinter dem Rampenlicht  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$86,229, 23 December 1979, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$37,823,676
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Alan Alda, Robert Blake, Elliott Gould, Gene Hackman, Jack Nicholson, and George Segal were considered for the role of Joe Gideon. See more »

Goofs

In a closeup of back of Joe's head during Bye Bye Love number, a large strip of Scotch tape is inexplicably running across back of his head. See more »

Quotes

Joe Gideon: Do you suppose Stanley Kubrick ever gets depressed?
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Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits, only the company credits and the title, which resembles revolving Broadway lights. See more »

Connections

References Lenny (1974) See more »

Soundtracks

Who's Sorry Now?
(1923) (uncredited)
Music by Ted Snyder
Lyrics by Bert Kalmar & Harry Ruby
Performed by Ann Reinking with Leland Palmer and Erzsebet Foldi
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User Reviews

 
Quite simply a brilliant film.
29 January 2003 | by See all my reviews

To think that Fosse synthesized musical theater, artistic obsession, relationships, fatherhood, and satire all within the framework of a deconstructionist film musical and made it all about himself to boot (including predicting the manner of his own death) without being the least bit self-congratulatory is amazing. The film is edited beautifully; choreographed flawlessly; lit with stark colors that almost fade to black and white at times; and acted with heart and verve, especially by Roy Scheider. The film has one of the most effective uses of the zoom lens (despised by most filmmakers precisely for their inability to figure out when to use it) in film history. The shot pulls back from a lone choreographer on the stage while multitudes of bodies go flying by him, letting us feel his insurmountable task of choosing which of these people will make his show come alive. Some may say the final series of musical numbers runs long but I defy anyone these days to sustain a musical film with the same success. "Moulin Rouge" and "Chicago", excellent films that they are, play their cards fast and furious, hoping to razzle-dazzle us just long enough that we'll stay tuned. "All That Jazz" dares to show you a taste of musicals to come ("Take Off With Us") and yet insists you remember where the form came from (the Busby Berkely-esque "Who's Sorry Now?"). When will they come out with the DVD? We can only hope soon.


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