Following an ever-growing epidemic of zombies that have risen from the dead, two Philadelphia S.W.A.T. team members, a traffic reporter, and his television executive girlfriend seek refuge in a secluded shopping mall.

Director:

George A. Romero
Reviews
Popularity
2,862 ( 336)
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David Emge ... Stephen
Ken Foree ... Peter
Scott H. Reiniger ... Roger
Gaylen Ross ... Francine
David Crawford David Crawford ... Dr. Foster
David Early David Early ... Mr. Berman
Richard France ... Scientist
Howard Smith ... TV Commentator
Daniel Dietrich Daniel Dietrich ... Givens
Fred Baker Fred Baker ... Commander
James A. Baffico James A. Baffico ... Wooley (as Jim Baffico)
Rod Stouffer Rod Stouffer ... Young Officer on Roof
Jese Del Gre Jese Del Gre ... Old Priest
Clayton McKinnon Clayton McKinnon ... Officer in Project Apt.
John Rice ... Officer in Project Apt.
Edit

Storyline

The zombie apocalypse has hit Earth. Two personnel from a TV station and two policemen set off in a helicopter to find a safe place to hide out. Their search leads them to a shopping mall where they manage to find a place that, while not zombie-free, is quite secure. So far, so good. Written by grantss

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In 1968, George Romero brought us "Night of the Living Dead." It became the classic horror film of its time. Now, George Romero brings us the most intensely shocking motion picture experience for all time. See more »

Genres:

Horror | Thriller

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Greg Besnak (who played Rhino, the Bald Mustachioed Biker Gang Leader in Knightriders (1981) and Luke Barnes, one of our villains, the Satanist family in John A. Russo's "Midnight" (1982)) appears as a brown haired and Fu Manchu mustachioed zombie in a poet shirt hit by Sledge in the side of his head with a sledgehammer, and he turns, full-face, into the camera. Later, when Sledge gets eaten, he has another close-up, descending upon him. But it appeared on the Director's Cut only. It was edited out in the US release. But also in the US and Italian release he can be seen getting hit by Blades the assistant head biker on the second floor, he also can be seen walking just as Mousey the Tommy-Gun biker and Butchie, the wild haired bearded biker (riding Harley-Davidson Panhead Motorcycle with sidecar) are making their escape of out the mall. See more »

Goofs

When Peter talks to Stephen at one point, his hand blocks his mouth. Moving away for a few seconds, however, it can be seen that Peter's lips do not match the words on the audio track. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tony, Man at WGON - TV ('You all right?'): [after Francine awakens from a nightmare] You alright?
[Francine nods]
Tony, Man at WGON - TV ('You all right?'): Shit's really hit the fan.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The zombies overrun the mall throughout the course of the end credits. See more »

Alternate Versions

What sets the Japanese Theatrical Version apart from all the other versions is its inclusion of a context for the zombification crisis. Nippon Herald Films, the film's Japanese distributor, feared that Japanese audiences would not be able to accept the ambiguous setting of zombies on Earth that Romero had deliberately left unanswered. As a result, their prints of the film begin with an explosion against a black background, followed by a typed-out explanatory text, presented in English with Japanese subtitles: "In 19XX an exploding planet in a far off galaxy beamed strange rays across space to Earth. It caused the transformation of the dead one after another into resurrected zombies seeking the flesh of the living---". Ironically, this exposition bares similarity to the possible cause of zombification described by a newscaster in Night of the Living Dead: the atmospheric explosion of a space probe that had become contaminated by radiation following an expedition to Venus. See more »

Connections

Referenced in That Movie Show: Dawn of the Dead (1978) (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Tango Tango
(uncredited)
Composed by Barry Stoller
Published by De Wolfe Music Ltd.
Mall Montage Scene
See more »

User Reviews

 
Still my favorite horror film...
10 February 2000 | by Quinoa1984See all my reviews

When you want brutal, look no further, but when you also want to see perhaps the greatest of all comic-book movies not based on a comic-book, it's in George Romero's original take on his continuing mythology. It's not just one of the towering horror films, or horror comedies (what will a poor dead fellow do when the escalator starts?!) but one of the great sequels, more ambitious and ass-kicking than its predecessor, with a filmmaker more confident and technically proficient with his abilities.

Romero didn't originally want to do *any* sequel to his original 'Night', but after a visit by some friends to a soon-to-open mall nearby his hometown of Pittsburgh, it struck a chord as to who would be coming here – and what so much consumerism in one place would mean. "Why do they come here?" one of the four survivors that happens upon this mall swarming with these flesh-eaters asks another. "This meant something to them. Instinct, maybe. This was an important part of their lives," he responds.

I don't think necessarily Romero meant to show the film as any sort of 'This is what will happen!" type of social horror thing. It's more about, this is where we are at NOW, and in that sense, though broader and a whole LOT bloodier, it holds a place right next to a film like Network as one of the magnificent satires of its time and place, and as much about what the public is like. Romero acts as both pessimist and optimist in this world though; past all the chopped limbs, exploding heads (oh yeah!), Tom Savini stunt and make-up and intestines ripped apart, what holds up the film for me is seeing these four characters come to grip with the horror they've made for themselves, holding up in this "paradise" of a mall.

Balls-to-the-wall horror, social horror, and some genuine paranoid horror stuff (note to self, never try and fire a gun at a single zombie when in a dark room full of electrical wiring and pipes), and plenty of rock and roll attitude, this is a personal favorite and the most entertaining horror film of its time. And the Goblin music soundtrack… yummy.


115 of 136 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 738 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA | Italy

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

24 May 1979 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

George A. Romero's Dawn of the Dead See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$650,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$159,822
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Ultimate Final Cut) | (Dario Argento's European Version) | | (TV) | (assembly cut)

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (German prints)| Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed