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Damien: Omen II (1978)

R | | Horror | 9 June 1978 (USA)
Damien the Antichrist, now about to turn thirteen years old, finally learns of his destiny under the guidance of an unholy disciple of Satan. Meanwhile dark forces begin to eliminate all those who suspect the child's true identity.

Directors:

Don Taylor, Mike Hodges (uncredited)

Writers:

Harvey Bernhard (story), David Seltzer (based on characters created by) | 2 more credits »
3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Holden ... Richard Thorn
Lee Grant ... Ann Thorn
Jonathan Scott-Taylor ... Damien Thorn
Robert Foxworth ... Paul Buher
Nicholas Pryor ... Charles Warren
Lew Ayres ... Bill Atherton
Sylvia Sidney ... Aunt Marion
Lance Henriksen ... Sergeant Neff
Elizabeth Shepherd ... Joan Hart
Lucas Donat ... Mark Thorn
Allan Arbus ... Pasarian (as Alan Arbus)
Fritz Ford Fritz Ford ... Murray
Meshach Taylor ... Dr. Kane
John J. Newcombe John J. Newcombe ... Teddy
John Charles Burns John Charles Burns ... Butler
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Storyline

Seven years later, Damien Thorn is about to turn 13 and is just discovering who he really is, and what he is destined to do. Now living with his Aunt, Uncle, and cousin in a wealthy suburb of Chicago, Damien is in line to inherit everything from his family. Can Richard Thorn finish the job that Damien's father (Ambassador Robert Thorn) started? Written by Mark J. Popp <poppmj@cadvision.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The first time was only a warning. See more »

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"Davidson Military Academy" is really Northwestern Military and Naval Academy in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and has the same insignia. This school merged with St. John's Military Academy in 1995 to be St. John's Northwestern Military Academy in Delafield, Wisconsin. See more »

Goofs

The elevator cables shown to cut both the doctor in the elevator car, as well as the car itself, in half would not have done so. The elevator shaft is too narrow and all elevator cars have at least FOUR cables to prevent the car from potentially sliding down the shaft in the event of catastrophic failure.

Any failed cable would strike the sides of the shaft and the other cables on it was down to the car. It would then encounter the trolley system on top of the elevator. All of these actions would cause it to lose momentum and it would fall to rest on top of the car itself. Even if it cut through the roof, it would not have enough remaining inertia to slice through the entire car itself.

This does not take into account that this is not an ordinary malfunction. Dr. Kane was on his way to show someone that there was something off about Damien, so the forces that protect Damien were at work and getting around these safeguards. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Kane: Mr. Thorn? They'll be alright. We've checked every boy for lung damage not a sign of it. Now they are gonna be nauseous for a little while but there is no permanent damage...
Richard Thorn: Doctor I don't care what it costs...
Dr. Kane: I assure you Mr. Thorn, they're all receiving the best care. Now there is one thing though, we made every possible test of blood damage, tissue damage and every boy was affected at some level though as I said not seriously. That is every boy except your nephew Damien.
Richard Thorn: Do you mean that...
Dr. Kane: No...
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Crazy Credits

An abridged 6 second version of the Alfred Newman Fox fanfare is heard See more »

Alternate Versions

The original version was released uncut with a "Not under 16" rating in German cinemas in 1978, the 1983 VHS release was uncut as well. The 1992 VHS re-release was cut (ca. 3 minutes) due to the fact that in the 1980s the uncut version was put on the index for youth endangering media. Only in 2001 the film was removed from that index and the film was re-released uncut, again with a "Not under 16" rating. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Omen Legacy (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Happy Birthday to You
(uncredited)
Written by Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill
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User Reviews

A must to see for anyone who liked THE OMEN.
10 November 2001 | by ChristiancrouseSee all my reviews

This sequel to THE OMEN is a "fun" film. It continues the story of the anti-Christ Damien into his teenage years and his years in military school. Now adopted into the family of his father's brother, an unsuspecting Damien is unwittingly at the centre of a plot to bring Satan's son to the threshold of power. Everyone around him is at risk as the secret of Damien's birth is under threat of exposure by forces emerging from around the world - and at the root of this threat are the mad depictions painted on an ancient wall that reveal the very face of evil.

Jonathon Scott-Taylor gives a commanding and creepy performance as the ultimate misfit son. Looking particularly significant in his military outfit, Scott-Taylor captures - as much as the script allows him - the torment of self-discovery as the truth of his existence is revealed to him. The script could have demanded more from such a fascinating scenario, and tried to make Damien more of a Miltonic Satanic Hero, but the film chooses to go for as much shock value whenever it can. Mysterious and violent accidents - linked by the ever-present shadow of a raven of death - dominate this movie from beginning to end. The scene involving an ill-fated lady on a deserted country road is one of its most grotesque. As death and destruction mount, Damien goes from self-possessed orphan to self-recognized supreme power in the span of two hours.

William Holden and Lee Grant play Damien's surrogate parents, Richard and Ann Thorn. They are not really allowed to display their incredible talents in this film, but Holden does fine trying to duplicate Peck's memorable performance in the original. Grant does what she can with this supporting role, but has a great moment in the film that proves worthy to wait for. The always wonderful Sylvia Sidney makes a memorable appearance as one of Damien's greatest "thorns" - the troublemaking menace Aunt Marion. And the ending is a bit of a shock if you watch the film closely, particularly if you listen to the exposition early on in the film about "The Whore of Babylon."

Another highlight is Jerry Goldsmith's title score - empowering, commanding and downright evil, the opening score is one of my favorites.

Although not as creepy as the first film, DAMIEN: OMEN II has its moments, and is worth seeing for anyone who likes to have a fun time with all this biblical stuff.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 June 1978 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Omen II See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,880,880, 11 June 1978

Gross USA:

$26,518,355

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$26,518,355
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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