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Damien: Omen II (1978)

R | | Horror | 9 June 1978 (USA)
Damien the Antichrist, now about to turn thirteen years old, finally learns of his destiny under the guidance of an unholy disciple of Satan. Meanwhile dark forces begin to eliminate all those who suspect the child's true identity.

Directors:

Don Taylor, Mike Hodges (uncredited)

Writers:

Harvey Bernhard (story), David Seltzer (based on characters created by) | 2 more credits »
3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Holden ... Richard Thorn
Lee Grant ... Ann Thorn
Jonathan Scott-Taylor ... Damien Thorn
Robert Foxworth ... Paul Buher
Nicholas Pryor ... Charles Warren
Lew Ayres ... Bill Atherton
Sylvia Sidney ... Aunt Marion
Lance Henriksen ... Sergeant Neff
Elizabeth Shepherd ... Joan Hart
Lucas Donat ... Mark Thorn
Allan Arbus ... Pasarian (as Alan Arbus)
Fritz Ford Fritz Ford ... Murray
Meshach Taylor ... Dr. Kane
John J. Newcombe John J. Newcombe ... Teddy
John Charles Burns John Charles Burns ... Butler
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Storyline

Seven years later, Damien Thorn is about to turn 13 and is just discovering who he really is, and what he is destined to do. Now living with his Aunt, Uncle, and cousin in a wealthy suburb of Chicago, Damien is in line to inherit everything from his family. Can Richard Thorn finish the job that Damien's father (Ambassador Robert Thorn) started? Written by Mark J. Popp <poppmj@cadvision.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

These eyes will follow you wherever you go and your nightmares will become a frightening reality. See more »

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Richard Donner was supposed to return as director, but he was busy with Superman (1978). See more »

Goofs

Simple blood tests could have determined that Damian was not the offspring of the ambassador and his wife. Why this is never seriously addressed during the film is unknown. They could, but there was never a reason to. It was established that the only ones that knew at the beginning of the first film was Damian's father, the priest that convinced him to switch the babies, and the Satanists involved with the birth. By the time the first film is over nobody knew except Satanists. If Robert never told Richard about it, there wouldn't have been any reason for them to do the tests. See more »

Quotes

Teddy: That's Damien's father in the back. My old man was on that team, too.
[pointing at picture]
Teddy: That's him. He was on the line. But Robert Thorn was quarterback. Even back then he was calling the plays for everybody.
Mark Thorn: [Coming in from Neff's office] You're next, Damien.
Damien Thorn: Teddy, don't ever talk about my father again. Do you understand?
Teddy: Can't you take a joke?
Damien Thorn: [Giving Teddy a long look] Yes.
[Turns to leave]
Mark Thorn: What was that all about?
Teddy: Your cousin really thinks he's somebody, doesn't he? My old man tells me the Thorns...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

An abridged 6 second version of the Alfred Newman Fox fanfare is heard See more »

Alternate Versions

The original version was released uncut with a "Not under 16" rating in German cinemas in 1978, the 1983 VHS release was uncut as well. The 1992 VHS re-release was cut (ca. 3 minutes) due to the fact that in the 1980s the uncut version was put on the index for youth endangering media. Only in 2001 the film was removed from that index and the film was re-released uncut, again with a "Not under 16" rating. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Filth and the Fury (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Happy Birthday to You
(uncredited)
Written by Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill
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User Reviews

A must to see for anyone who liked THE OMEN.
10 November 2001 | by ChristiancrouseSee all my reviews

This sequel to THE OMEN is a "fun" film. It continues the story of the anti-Christ Damien into his teenage years and his years in military school. Now adopted into the family of his father's brother, an unsuspecting Damien is unwittingly at the centre of a plot to bring Satan's son to the threshold of power. Everyone around him is at risk as the secret of Damien's birth is under threat of exposure by forces emerging from around the world - and at the root of this threat are the mad depictions painted on an ancient wall that reveal the very face of evil.

Jonathon Scott-Taylor gives a commanding and creepy performance as the ultimate misfit son. Looking particularly significant in his military outfit, Scott-Taylor captures - as much as the script allows him - the torment of self-discovery as the truth of his existence is revealed to him. The script could have demanded more from such a fascinating scenario, and tried to make Damien more of a Miltonic Satanic Hero, but the film chooses to go for as much shock value whenever it can. Mysterious and violent accidents - linked by the ever-present shadow of a raven of death - dominate this movie from beginning to end. The scene involving an ill-fated lady on a deserted country road is one of its most grotesque. As death and destruction mount, Damien goes from self-possessed orphan to self-recognized supreme power in the span of two hours.

William Holden and Lee Grant play Damien's surrogate parents, Richard and Ann Thorn. They are not really allowed to display their incredible talents in this film, but Holden does fine trying to duplicate Peck's memorable performance in the original. Grant does what she can with this supporting role, but has a great moment in the film that proves worthy to wait for. The always wonderful Sylvia Sidney makes a memorable appearance as one of Damien's greatest "thorns" - the troublemaking menace Aunt Marion. And the ending is a bit of a shock if you watch the film closely, particularly if you listen to the exposition early on in the film about "The Whore of Babylon."

Another highlight is Jerry Goldsmith's title score - empowering, commanding and downright evil, the opening score is one of my favorites.

Although not as creepy as the first film, DAMIEN: OMEN II has its moments, and is worth seeing for anyone who likes to have a fun time with all this biblical stuff.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 June 1978 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Omen II See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,880,880, 11 June 1978

Gross USA:

$26,518,355

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$26,518,355
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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