7.3/10
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112 user 59 critic

Hard Times (1975)

Trailer
2:21 | Trailer
The adventures of a drifter turned illegal prize-fighter during the Depression Era in New Orleans.

Director:

Walter Hill

Writers:

Walter Hill (screenplay), Bryan Gindoff (screenplay) | 3 more credits »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Charles Bronson ... Chaney
James Coburn ... Speed
Jill Ireland ... Lucy Simpson
Strother Martin ... Poe
Margaret Blye ... Gayleen Schoonover (as Maggie Blye)
Michael McGuire ... Gandil
Felice Orlandi ... Le Beau
Edward Walsh Edward Walsh ... Pettibon
Bruce Glover ... Doty
Robert Tessier ... Jim Henry
Nick Dimitri ... Street
Frank McRae ... Hammerman
Maurice Kowalewski ... Caesare
Naomi Stevens ... Madam
Lyla Hay Owen Lyla Hay Owen ... Waitress
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Storyline

During the Great Depression, the mysterious drifter Chaney befriends the promoter of illegal street fights Speed and they go to New Orleans to make money fighting on the streets. Speed is welcomed by his mistress Gayleen Schoonoverand invites his former partner Poe to team-up with them. Meanwhile Chaney has a love affair with the local Lucy Simpson. Speed has a huge debt with the dangerous loan shark Doty and borrows money to promote the fight of Chaney and the local champion Jim Henry, who is managed by the also promoter. Casey wins the fight, they make a lot of money but Speed is an addicted gambler and loses his share in the dice table. But Doty wants his money back and Speed's only chance is Chaney accepts to bet his own money that he is saving and fight a winner that Gandil brought from Chicago. Will he accept the challenge? Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

NEW ORLEANS, 1933. In those days words didn't buy much. [Theatrical] See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Sport

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

DVD.net.au reported that "Obtained by producer Lawrence Gordon in March 1974, 'Hard Times' was an original screenplay by Bryan Gindoff and Bruce Henstell; financed independently by tax shelter dollars, production on the film commenced later that same year, with shooting conducted on location in New Orleans, Louisiana. The film project was renamed 'The Street Fighter', however, in a surprising irony, its name was reverted back to its original title, when Gordon and Hill discovered, whilst their film was still in production, that a martial arts epic was due to be released--Shigehiro Ozawa's The Street Fighter (1974)." See more »

Goofs

The juke box plays Cajun music recorded by Adam Hebert from the 1960s. This is not the style of Cajun music (with steel guitar) that one would have heard during the Depression when the movie was set. See more »

Quotes

Gayleen Schoonover: [leaving the fight with the Cajuns] Come all this way to lose all of our money. Just breaks my heart.
Speed: Breaks my butt is what it breaks!
Chaney: Let's drive around the back country roads.
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Soundtracks

Hard Time Blues
(uncredited)
Written by Julius Farmer, Alfred Roberts, Percy Randolph & Ed Stanall
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User Reviews

 
The Original Fight Club? More In-Between
4 January 2006 | by BogmeisterSee all my reviews

With this, his first directing job, Walter Hill showed his tendency for archetypal characters (see the later "The Driver" - where the characters didn't even have proper names - and, of course, "The Warriors"). Here, Bronson is 'The Fighter'...Coburn is 'The Hustler'...Martin is 'The Addict-Medic'...and so forth. Bronson's final opponent is simply named 'Street' while the big guy who damages The Hustler's automobile with a big hammer is just called 'Hammerman.' They all present striking, impressive figures; you don't easily forget any of them. They stride or shuffle through a page of history, in this case Depression-era New Orleans, nicely atmospheric as shown here. Times are hard. People need to be hard, as well. One way to make good money is in pick up fights, street fights in warehouses, on docks or, in one case of rich atmosphere, in the bayou.

Chaney, aka The Fighter, as played by Bronson, true to director Hill's method of archetypes, first appears on a slow moving train from places unknown. We never learn anything of his past history, even though there's about 50 years worth there. We learn only of his incredible hitting ability in the current time frame of the story's progression. In a way, Bronson was born to play this role: he's certainly not a young man here but he looks so tough we have no trouble believing he can wipe out men 20 years his junior. With the archetype of The Fighter, the story plays out like some Depression times fable, the tale of a mystery man or warrior arrived in a city to astonish all the onlookers with his formidable fighting abilities. The fights themselves are quite memorable; the viewer has the good fortune to witness these with the shouting hordes of betting men from the safety of a couch at home. We're a part of the spectacle, a guilty participant in a brutal spectator sport, a much more gritty version of modern boxing, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

The rest of the cast is super: Coburn was never better as Speed 'The Hustler' and Chaney's front-man/manager. It's mostly through him that we hear all the phrases and quips common to those places & times, and Coburn delivers them all with a gusto & panache few are capable of. You really believe he was born as the 19th century was ending, grew up in the twenties and adjusted to the Depression accordingly. You'll always remember his retorts to the bayou residents and his last insult about fish to Gandil, the bigshot. Speed and Chaney need each other and their relationship is another strong point; Speed is all about the money, sure, but you sense he has a strong admiration for Bronson's power and quiet nobility (this is confirmed at the end). As Poe, Strother Martin created & added another indelible character to the long list on his resume. Other actors would've been saddled with some of the odd dialog he has to deliver, but he just breezes through it like a song. Glover (Crispin's dad) is also very good as a loan shark, as is McGuire as the rich Gandil. Mention should also be made of the top two fighters (Tessier & Dimitri). The film needed characters who could pose a threat to Chaney and these two looked just as tough. Now if only Chaney would explain more about those 'in-betweens'... but he doesn't say much.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 September 1975 (Netherlands) See more »

Also Known As:

Street Fighter See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,700,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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