Three amateur bank robbers plan to hold up a bank. A nice simple robbery: Walk in, take the money, and run. Unfortunately, the supposedly uncomplicated heist suddenly becomes a bizarre nightmare as everything that could go wrong does.

Director:

Sidney Lumet

Writers:

Frank Pierson (screenplay), P.F. Kluge (based upon a magazine article by) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
1,826 ( 244)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 13 wins & 21 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Penelope Allen ... Sylvia
Sully Boyar ... Mulvaney
John Cazale ... Sal
Beulah Garrick Beulah Garrick ... Margaret
Carol Kane ... Jenny
Sandra Kazan Sandra Kazan ... Deborah
Marcia Jean Kurtz ... Miriam
Amy Levitt ... Maria
John Marriott ... Howard
Estelle Omens Estelle Omens ... Edna
Al Pacino ... Sonny
Gary Springer ... Stevie
James Broderick ... Sheldon
Charles Durning ... Moretti
Carmine Foresta Carmine Foresta ... Carmine
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Storyline

Based upon a real-life story that happened in the early seventies in which the Chase Manhattan Bank in Gravesend, Brooklyn, was held siege by a bank robber determined to steal enough money for his wife (a trans woman) to undergo a sex change operation. On a hot summer afternoon, the First Savings Bank of Brooklyn is held up by Sonny and Sal, two down-and-out characters. Although the bank manager and female tellers agree not to interfere with the robbery, Sonny finds that there's actually nothing much to steal, as most of the cash has been picked up for the day. Sonny then gets an unexpected phone call from Police Captain Moretti, who tells him the place is surrounded by the city's entire police force. Having few options under the circumstances, Sonny nervously bargains with Moretti, demanding safe escort to the airport and a plane out of the country in return for the bank employees' safety. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Most Bizarre Bank Siege Ever See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

James Broderick's final theatrical film appearance. See more »

Goofs

New York State license plates of the time were orange on blue, not blue on yellow. See more »

Quotes

Sonny: [on a TV broadcast over the phone] I'm robbing a bank because they got money here. That's why I'm robbing it.
TV Anchorman: No, what I mean is why do you feel you have to steal for money? Couldn't you get a job?
Sonny: Uh, no. Doing what? You know if you want a job you've got to be a member of a union. See, and if you got no union card you don't get a job.
TV Anchorman: What about non-union occupations?
Sonny: What's wrong with this guy? What do you mean non-union, like what? A bank teller? You know how much a bank teller makes a week? Not ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: What you are about to see is true - It happened in Brooklyn, New York on August 22, 1972. See more »

Alternate Versions

Recent DVD release replaces the old Warner Bros. logo at the beginning with the newer WB/AOL logo. See more »


Soundtracks

Easy Livin'
(uncredited)
Written by Ken Hensley
Performed by Uriah Heep
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User Reviews

 
great character study and a masterful actors' showcase
18 May 2005 | by kwongersSee all my reviews

Sidney Lumet's "Dog Day Afternoon" is one of the most highly enjoyable and wildly funny movies I've ever seen - smart, sharp, complex, witty (and often quotable) dialogue, and superbly acted. Al Pacino stars as Sonny, an optimistic loser who decides to hold up a bank with his friend Sal (played by the late, great John Cazale) to get money for his lover Leon's sex-change operation.

The film is only worked around a few sequences, and may seem overlong to some, but it works excellently because it is held together by the fantastic acting. Al Pacino is astounding as Sonny, and his work here even eclipses the excellent work he did as Michael Corleone in "The Godfather" (and that's saying something, because I adore that movie and his portrayal). Pacino has the facial tics and the energy and the wide-eyed optimism down pat, and his performance is extremely engaging and entertaining. Take, for example, his scene where he rouses up the crowd against the police by chanting, "Attica! Attica! Put your f---ing guns down!" A lesser actor would have made it insipid, but Pacino makes it oddly poignant and hilarious at the same time. (And he was robbed of his Oscar for his role.) The late John Cazale is also superb as Sal, the dopey-eyed follower, the quiet laid-back calm to Pacino's maniacal energy. It's a less flashier role, but Cazale still brings on all the laughs, especially in his deadpan delivery of the line, "Sonny, they're saying there are two homosexuals in here...I'm not a homosexual."

Frank Pierson won an Oscar for his script for a reason - the dialogue is hilarious, sharp, and witty. Many of the lines in this movie are extremely quotable (and you can check some of them out under "memorable quotes"). This is intelligent writing, in the sense that you will laugh and be moved at the same time.

Great movie! It belongs in your VHS or DVD collection. 10/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 December 1975 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dog Day Afternoon See more »

Filming Locations:

New York, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,800,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$50,000,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$50,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1975)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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