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The Decameron (1971)

Il Decameron (original title)
An adaptation of nine stories from Boccaccio's "Decameron".

Writers:

Giovanni Boccaccio (novel) (as G. Boccaccio), Pier Paolo Pasolini
Reviews
1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Franco Citti ... Ciappelletto
Ninetto Davoli ... Andreuccio of Perugia
Jovan Jovanovic Jovan Jovanovic ... Rustico (scenes deleted)
Vincenzo Amato ... Masetto of Lamporecchio
Angela Luce ... Peronella
Giuseppe Zigaina Giuseppe Zigaina ... Monk
Maria Gabriella Maione ... Una madonna (as Gabriella Frankel)
Vincenzo Cristo Vincenzo Cristo
Pier Paolo Pasolini ... Allievo di Giotto (as P.P. Pasolini)
Giorgio Iovine Giorgio Iovine ... Lizio da Valbona
Salvatore Bilardo Salvatore Bilardo
Vincenzo Ferrigno Vincenzo Ferrigno ... Giannello
Luigi Seraponte Luigi Seraponte
Antonio Diddio Antonio Diddio
Mirella Catanesi Mirella Catanesi
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Storyline

An adaptation of nine stories from Bocaccio's "Decameron": **** Segment 1: A young man from Perugia is swindled twice in Naples, but ends up rich; **** Segment 2: A man poses as a deaf-mute in a convent of curious nuns; **** Segment 3: A woman must hide her lover when her husband comes home early; **** Segment 4: A scoundrel fools a priest on his deathbed; **** Segment 5: Three brothers take revenge on their sister's lover; **** Segment 6: A young girl sleeps on the roof to meet her boyfriend at night; **** Segment 7: A group of painters wait for inspiration; **** Segment 8: A crafty priest attempts to seduce his friend's wife; **** Segment 9: Two friends make a pact to find out what happens after death. Written by Philip Brubaker <coda@nando.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Pasolini - Sacred and Profane See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sensuality, and for some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first film in Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Trilogy of Life", continuing with The Canterbury Tales (1972) and concluding with Arabian Nights (1974). See more »

Goofs

When Caterina sleeps with Riccardo, a tan line left by a bikini top can be seen on her back. However the bikini was not in use in 14th century Italy. Riccardo's body also shows tan lines left by wearing a pair of bathing trunks. Tan lines are also visible on the sinners cast into Hell in the dream sequence. See more »

Quotes

The Madonna: This wine is bliss for us to piss!
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Alternate Versions

Although the cinema version was intact the 1988 UK Warner video was cut by 22 secs by the BBFC to remove shots of naked genitals during the bedroom sex scene with the nun. The cuts were fully restored in the 2001 BFI DVD release. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) See more »

User Reviews

Amusing Medieval Adventures
13 March 2004 | by RobertF87See all my reviews

This film is a portmanteau film based on the famous 14th Century Italian story collection "The Decameron" by Giovanni Boccaccio. The book deals with ten people telling a story each every day for ten days, but Pier Paolo Pasolini (for obvious reasons) chooses merely nine stories for his film. Most of the stories deal with sex or deception (usually both).

Like all portmanteau films, some stories are better than others, but most of the stories in this film are so short that, if you don't enjoy one story, you don't have to wait long for the next one.

The film depicts a world filled with dirt and vulgarity but also full of life. Pasolini used a lot of ordinary people in his films and here we see many of the actors are not conventionally attractive (for example many have bad, or missing, teeth). Pasolini appears in the film as a pupil of the painter Giotto who is assigned to paint a mural on the wall of a church.

I found this film funny, charming and very entertaining. Definitely for adults though, there is quite a lot of sex and nudity on display here.

This was the first film in Pasolini's so-called "Trilogy of Life" and was followed by "The Canterbury Tales" and "The Arabian Nights".


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Details

Country:

Italy | France | West Germany

Language:

Italian | Neapolitan

Release Date:

29 October 1971 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Decameron See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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