7.8/10
932
6 user 6 critic

The Hour of the Furnaces (1968)

La hora de los hornos: Notas y testimonios sobre el neocolonialismo, la violencia y la liberación (original title)
Divided into three segments, namely 1 Neocolonialism, 2 Act for liberation, 3 Violence and liberation, the documentary lasts more than 4 hours this deals with the defense of the revolution ... See full summary »
Reviews
2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
María de la Paz María de la Paz ... Narrator
Fernando E. Solanas ... Narrator (as Fernando Solanas)
Edgardo Suárez Edgardo Suárez ... Narrator
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Storyline

Divided into three segments, namely 1 Neocolonialism, 2 Act for liberation, 3 Violence and liberation, the documentary lasts more than 4 hours this deals with the defense of the revolution and the revolution of the third world such as the revolt of the students in the United States and Western Europe, Czech citizens protest against the Soviet Union's State bureaucracy and also the revolution that (probably) is unprecedented in Argentina. Written by egi david perdana

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Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film began shooting as early as 1966 during the constitutional government in Argentina of Arturo Illia, and continued in clandestine form when that government was overthrown by the general Juan Carlos Ongania. See more »

Connections

Edited from Maioria Absoluta (1964) See more »

User Reviews

 
Political manifesto through monologue, dialogue and montage.
14 March 2002 | by ollekidSee all my reviews

As a very strong document of a lost age it still holds actuality.

The film leaves no room for objection and it is assured of it's own truth. The subject of the film is the "Neo-Colonisation" of South America through a historical perspective but is still heavily anchored in the 60s. It is divided into sections labelled The History, The Country, The System and so forth. Each section is usually introduced with a presentation of the subject and it's problems, complications and horrors in a fact like fashion but then drifts into strong pictures illustrating the subject alternatively it uses very strong montage sequences (both audio and visual). Examples of these montages are cuts between ad campaigns and poverty or a slaughterhouse and the exploitation of South American resources and so fort, all skilfully made. In whole the film is a very strong piece of work and it would be futile to, at this level, try and analyse it. Still I would like to comment that it is as much propaganda as manifesto, not that it would make it a worse film but still, it doesn't really strike you as all that very objective. To wrap it up I must say that it is well worth seeing and studying.


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Details

Country:

Argentina

Language:

Spanish | English | Portuguese

Release Date:

1 November 1973 (Argentina) See more »

Also Known As:

The Hour of the Furnaces See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono
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