A coffin-dragging gunslinger and a half-breed prostitute become embroiled in a bitter feud between a Klan of Southern racists and a band of Mexican Revolutionaries.

Director:

Sergio Corbucci

Writers:

Sergio Corbucci (story), Bruno Corbucci (story) | 5 more credits »
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Popularity
3,726 ( 3,273)

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Franco Nero ... Django
José Bódalo ... Gen. Hugo Rodriguez (as José Bodalo)
Loredana Nusciak ... Maria
Ángel Álvarez ... Nathaniel the Bartender (as Angel Alvarez)
Gino Pernice ... Brother Jonathan (as Jimmy Douglas)
Simón Arriaga Simón Arriaga ... Miguel (as Simon Arriaga)
Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia ... Klan Member (as Ivan Scratuglia)
Remo De Angelis ... Ricardo (as Erik Schippers)
Rafael Albaicín Rafael Albaicín ... Member of Hugo's Gang (as Raphael Albaicin)
José Canalejas ... Member of Hugo's Gang (as José Canalecas)
Eduardo Fajardo ... Major Jackson
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Storyline

Squelching across a God-forsaken ghost town near the US/Mexican border, always dragging a heavy coffin, blue-eyed Django, a drifting, mud-spattered, former Union soldier, saves runaway María from certain death. But, the wooden container with the mysterious content has already caught the attention of the racist ex-Confederate officer, Major Jackson, and his gang of white supremacists, and before long, things get nasty. Now, the guns have the final say, and as if that weren't enough, Jackson's sworn enemy, General Hugo Rodríguez, and his feared revolutionaries, enter the picture, wanting to have a piece of the action. Can Django, the taciturn stranger with the lighting-fast right hand, take on two armies of murderous henchmen, and live to tell the tale? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He killed for gold... He killed for his woman... He killed for himself! See more »

Genres:

Action | Western

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's film Django Unchained (2012), although it is not a remake of this film, despite the theme song being used in the opening credits and Franco Nero making a cameo opposite Jamie Foxx's Django. See more »

Goofs

When Miguel uses the machine gun during the fort raid, a wire or string can be clearly seen attached to the left side of the belt moving it to simulate actual firing. See more »

Quotes

Nataniele: I sure never thought I'd end up grave-digging and not even getting paid for it, either. Anyhow, it's better to be above ground doing that than below ground doing nothing.
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Alternate Versions

Restored version by Blue Underground includes restored scenes not found on previous releases. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Shoot First... Ask Questions Later (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

Django (theme)
Lyrics by Franco Migliacci (as Migliacci) and Robert Mellin (uncredited)
Composed by Luis Bacalov (as Enriquez)
Conducted by Bruno Nicolai (uncredited)
Performed by Rocky Roberts
Published by General Music [it]
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User Reviews

 
Paint your wagon....RED WITH BLOOD!
11 July 2005 | by CoventrySee all my reviews

Sergio Corbucci's "Django", as well as his "The Great Silence" are two massively underrated spaghetti-westerns that co-founded the genre, along with Sergio Leone's Dollars-trilogy. Okay, this no "Once Upon a Time in the West" when it comes to atmosphere or plotting, but it is a magnificently mounted action ride with an utterly cool lead hero and an enormous body count. "Django" remained banned in several countries for a long time because of its explicit, comic-book like violence, and you'll see that this wasn't without reason, as the bad guys get slaughtered by the dozen in a good old-fashioned gunslinger way. The movie opens terrifically, with a sleazy title song and vicious images of a lonely cowboy wandering through the Southern wastelands with a coffin in tow. The man is Django and his coffin contains whatever he requires to fulfill his difficult goal: single-handedly finishing the war between the racist Major Jackson and Mexican bandidos by annihilating them all. Corbucci implements a straightforward, no-nonsense filming style with some great visuals and very creative camera angles. There are some ingenious aspects (Django's act of vengeance with molested hands) as well as some delicious clichés moments (wrestling prostitutes, extended bar fight sequences...). This film may not be a very intellectual form of entertainment, but it sure is fun and produced with a certain degree of class.

Followed by a numberless amount of sequels, rip-offs and wannabes that are hardly worth purchasing. Stick to the original and have a blast!


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Details

Country:

Italy | Spain

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

December 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Jango See more »

Filming Locations:

Elios Film, Rome, Lazio, Italy See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,150, 23 December 2012

Gross USA:

$25,916

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$25,916
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (censored) | (censored)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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