6.3/10
2,900
51 user 21 critic

The Appaloosa (1966)

Approved | | Action, Drama, Romance | October 1966 (Austria)
Man tries to recover a horse stolen from him by a Mexican bandit.

Director:

Sidney J. Furie

Writers:

James Bridges (screenplay), Roland Kibbee (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Marlon Brando ... Matt Fletcher
Anjanette Comer ... Trini Medena
John Saxon ... Chuy Medena
Emilio Fernández ... Lazaro (as Emilio Fernandez)
Alex Montoya Alex Montoya ... Squint Eye
Miriam Colon ... Ana
Rafael Campos ... Paco
Frank Silvera ... Ramos -Pig Farmer
Larry D. Mann ... Priest
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Storyline

Matt Fletcher, a Mexican-American buffalo hunter is constantly harassed and humiliated by bandit general Chuy Medina. When the bandit steals his horse - the appaloosa of the title - he sets out to even scores; at the climax, single-handedly, he takes on the whole gang. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Between the Hunter and the Hunted..the Wanton and the Wanted...lies the violent trail...Southwest to Sonora! (original poster) See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sidney Furie, the director, had many problems on the set because of his way, his method of filming, the weird angles he asked of the camera operator, an old timer in the movie business since Gone With the Wind. Marlon Brando also told Furie that he was a lousy director. See more »

Goofs

The Appaloosa which portrays the title character was actually a registered Appaloosa stallion named Cojo Rojo. He was born in 1960 and just prior to being used for the film he was racing on the California tracks. He sired several foals, including several race champions. During filming a few other similarly marked horses were used as stunt horses, but the majority of work was done by Cojo Rojo. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Priest: Madam.
[enters confessional booth]
Matt Fletcher: I'm having a little trouble getting started, Father.
Priest: You are in the House of God now, my son. Speak from your heart.
Matt Fletcher: Well, I've done a lot of killin'. I've killed a lot of men and sinned a lot of women. But the men I killed needed killin' and the women wanted sinnin', and well, I never was one much to argue.
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Connections

Referenced in Sidney J. Furie: Fire Up the Carousel! See more »

User Reviews

 
Cracking Good Brando
24 February 2005 | by Bob-45See all my reviews

"The Appaloosa" is a superior low-key western with a great performance by Marlon Brando and very good ones by John Saxon and Anjanette Comer. Brando plays a white man raised by Mexicans who returns from the Civil War tired of killing and ready to build a ranch around one Appaloosa stallion. Brando has the misfortune of becoming a tool for Comer to escape the clutches of Saxon. Saxon retaliates by stealing Brando's stallion, and Brando follows Saxon into Mexico to reclaim it. Director Sidney J. Furie ("The Ipcress File," "Iron Eagle") extensively uses extreme close-ups of faces, in the same manner as Sergio Leone, but not for the same purpose. Furie uses these close-ups to establish intimacy between the characters and the audience. This works beautifully in "The Appaloosa," particularly so since the story is so unremarkable and low-key and Brando's character is by no means a superman. Most of the violence is of the "G" rated variety, with the notable exception of a hand-wrestling contest played with the addition of scorpions.

While the ending of "The Appaloosa" is as abrupt and unremarkable as everything that precedes, intimate moments in the movie linger long after. As examples:

o Brando's confessional o The little girl telling Brando he smells like a goat o The goat herder telling Brando about Saxon's gunmen killing his pet goat o Comer telling Brando her fate if he doesn't help her escape Saxon o The hand-wrestling contest

There are many more unremarkable but somehow memorable moments in the sublime "Appaloosa." It is too insignificant to be great, but it most certainly very good. I give "The Appaloosa" an "8".


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

October 1966 (Austria) See more »

Also Known As:

The Appaloosa See more »

Filming Locations:

Wrightwood, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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