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The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1964) - Plot Summary Poster

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Summaries

  • Anthology film about three owners of a yellow Rolls-Royce. A British diplomat buys the car for his French wife. A mobster's girlfriend has an affair in Italy. An American woman drives a Yugoslavian partisan to Ljubljana on the eve of the Nazi invasion.

  • Three stories about the lives and loves of those who own a certain yellow Rolls-Royce: **First purchased by the Marquess of Frinton for his wife as a belated anniversary present, the Marchiness finds her own use for the vehicle, one which prompts her husband to sell the car in disgust. **Gangster Paolo Maltese's moll, Mae, thinks the Rolls is a "classy" car in which to tour Paolo's home town in Italy. When Paolo is called away to the U.S. to finish some "business", a bored Mae takes the Rolls-Royce on a spin through the country, enjoying both the sights and the handsome Italian photographer who crosses her path. **By the outbreak of World War II, the car has come into the possession of socialite Gerda Millet. While on her way to visit Yugoslavian royalty, Gerda and the Rolls-Royce become (at first) unwitting and then (eventually) most willing participants in the Yugoslavian fight.

  • Three stories of love-hurt linked only by a yellow Rolls-Royce. Marquess Charles Printon, an aristocrat and diplomatic official of the British Foreign and Colonial Office in the days of the British Empire, buys a yellow brand new Phantom model as a belated anniversary present for his wife Eloyse. They attend the extremely fashionable Ascot horse races, a socialite event never missed by the royal family, where the Marquess has a horse competing, which wins a cup, but any pride and joy taste bitter after finding Eloyse red-lipped committing infidelity in the Rolls-Royce with an assistant of his, without either knowing if there is actual love between them. For appearances sake, they agree as a modus vivendi to pretend nothing has changed. The cuckolded diplomat can no longer bear to look at the Rolls-Royce, so it's sold and shipped to the Italian Riviera where, alledgedly after a maharajah, who lost it again in Monte Carlo casino, the American mafioso Paolo Maltese buys it, eager to show his ancestral country to his spoiled, slutty fiancée Mae, who alas, appreciates nothing Italian, and only starts having fun after they meet the young Stefano, an attractive young guide-photographer, who proves himself as an entertaining flirter. When Paolo must return for a few days to Miami for business, he leaves Mae to continue the tour, for which she couldn't care less, nor the old Lieutenant Joey Maltese left to chaperon her, so they are both bored, take a spin to the Amalfi coast, and in Sorianao bump into Stefano again, who this time gets to entertain and seduce Mae, and during a swim takes her diving to a mythological nymph's grotto, where Stefano finally learns how his till then unrecognized dangerous rival is, yet they finally kiss, silently noted by Joey, but she dreads Paolo's impending return, and just in time decides to dump her lover rather then risk a bloodbath. In 1941, the Rolls-Royce is in Trieste, where the Yugoslav Davich begs a ride from American celebrity Gerda Millet, who is on her way to visit his king Peter, is smuggled in the trunk; soon war catches up, while his Mediterranean charm.

  • Three separate stories of the love lives of the various owners of the same 1939 yellow Rolls-Royce Phantom are told. The original owner, Lord Charles, the Marquess of Frinton, buys it as a tenth wedding anniversary present for his French wife, Lady Eloise, on the eve of the Ascot Gold Cup, in which he has a horse entered and is expected to win. As Lord Charles focuses on the activities around the race and his diplomatic duties, he may be unaware of Lady Eloise's own activities, which may make this anniversary and the gift a memorable one, but not in a good way. Over two thousand miles (over thirty-two hundred kilometers) later, Paolo Maltese, a world renowned American gangster, buys the Rolls-Royce for his girlfriend and fiancée, Mae Jenkins, as a vehicle in which to travel around Italy. On their travels, they meet a street photographer named Stefano, who flirts with Mae, which Paolo believes is innocent and harmless enough. Despite Mae outwardly calling Stefano amoral for flirting with her, an engaged woman, she falls for him, and he in return truly does fall in love with her. As Paolo is called back to the U.S. to deal with business, Mae and Stefano are able to spend time together. Mae has to decide if she loves Stefano enough to leave him, since Paolo would never let her go, and Paolo's right-hand man, Joey Friedlander, who has seen what has happened between Mae and Stefano, will have to decide if he will rat them out to Paolo for his own self-preservation. The car, having seen better days, in 1941 comes under the ownership of middle-aged American socialite, Gerda Millett, an overbearing and headstrong woman who always gets her way, or else, and is somewhat oblivious to world activities outside of her general sphere. In Trieste, she is planning on making a trip into Yugoslavia to meet with the new Prince, Peter. In Trieste, she is persuaded by a Yugolsavian national named Davich to give him ride to his homeland. It isn't until they are approaching the border that she learns he is a Yugoslavian revolutionary, who, despite her earliest concerns, is not out to kill Prince Peter, but rather work to defeat what he and his colleagues know will be the imminent Nazi invasion of Yugoslavia. Beyond the issue of getting Davich over the border without being detected by border control, Mrs. Millett may see first-hand for what Davich is fighting if they do make it across.

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