In 1944, a German colonel loads a train with French art treasures to send to Germany. The Resistance must stop it without damaging the cargo.

Directors:

John Frankenheimer, Arthur Penn (uncredited)

Writers:

Franklin Coen (screen story), Frank Davis (screen story) | 3 more credits »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Burt Lancaster ... Paul Labiche
Paul Scofield ... Colonel Franz Von Waldheim
Jeanne Moreau ... Christine
Suzanne Flon ... Mlle. Villard
Michel Simon ... Papa Boule
Wolfgang Preiss ... Major Herren
Albert Rémy ... Didont (as Albert Remy)
Charles Millot ... Pesquet
Richard Münch Richard Münch ... General Von Lubitz (as Richard Munch)
Jacques Marin ... Jacques - Rive-Reine Station Master
Paul Bonifas ... Spinet - Resistance Leader
Jean Bouchaud Jean Bouchaud ... Captain Schmidt
Donald O'Brien ... Sergeant Schwartz (as Donal O'Brien)
Jean-Pierre Zola ... Octave
Arthur Brauss ... Pilzer (as Art Brauss)
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Storyline

As the Allied forces approach Paris in August 1944, German Colonel Von Waldheim is desperate to take all of France's greatest paintings to Germany. He manages to secure a train to transport the valuable art works even as the chaos of retreat descends upon them. The French resistance however wants to stop them from stealing their national treasures but have received orders from London that they are not to be destroyed. The station master, Labiche, is tasked with scheduling the train and making it all happen smoothly but he is also part of a dwindling group of resistance fighters tasked with preventing the theft. He and others stage an elaborate ruse to keep the train from ever leaving French territory. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

They bombed it. They strafed it. Sabotaged it. Cursed the train! See more »

Genres:

Thriller | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Boxoffice magazine in 1964, filming had been shut down for several weeks before resuming in April of that year. See more »

Goofs

When the bombing of the railway yard is about to start, we are shown a close up of Major Von Herren's watch when he is talking on the phone to Deitrich in the switch tower. The watch shows 10 o'clock, but the second hand is not moving, indicating the watch had not been wound. See more »

Quotes

Labiche: Well, hurry it up. We're working on a locomotive, not a pocketwatch.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: PARIS August 2-1944 1511th day of German occupation See more »

Alternate Versions

Whilst the official run time is 133 minutes, the BBFC website has two separate entries, one with a theatrical 'U' rated certificate in 1964 running at 141 minutes 31 seconds and the other entry with a theatrical 'A' rated certificate in 1959 running at 90 minutes 37 seconds. Though the second entry seems incorrect due to the erroneous date of certification being 21 October 1959 (the film was being made in 1963 and is copyrighted in 1964) and a much shorter run time, the BBFC reference numbering is in sequence with the later video rated entries so it is unknown if this 1959 entry is a much shorter cut of this film or this is an error in the BBFC records. It is also not known if the 142 minute entry is a longer cut of the film that has simply not been since it's UK theatrical release in 1964. See more »

Connections

Referenced in What's My Line?: Robert Mitchum (2) (1965) See more »

User Reviews

Interesting sidenote...
26 January 2001 | by hbreimhurstSee all my reviews

Like everyone else who has posted here, I think this film is superb. Brilliant screenplay, excellent acting, exceptional directing, and so on and so forth. I think there is one little twist to the screenplay that deserves mention. Burt Lancaster has not one spoken line in the final 20 minutes of the movie. I can't recall ever seeing that done with a major character in a mainstream film. His actions ARE his words. In the final scene, we know exactly what he is thinking without him saying a word. A lovely subtle touch and the crowning moment in a truly great film.


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Details

Country:

France | Italy | USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

7 March 1965 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

John Frankenheimer's The Train See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,700,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical release) (1964)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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