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Lord Jim ()


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After being discredited as a coward, a 19th century seaman (Peter O'Toole) lives for only one purpose: to redeem himself. Based on Joseph Conrad's novel written in 1900.

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Lord Jim
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Gentleman Brown
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Cornelius (as Curt Jurgens)
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The General
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Marlow
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Stein
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The Girl
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Schomberg
Jûzô Itami ...
Waris (as Ichizo Itami)
Tatsuo Saitô ...
Du-Ramin
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Brierly
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Robinson
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Malay (as Eric Young)
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Captain Chester
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Captain of Patna
Rafiq Anwar ...
Moslem Leader (as Rafik Anwar)
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Elder
Newton Blick ...
Doctor
A.J. Brown ...
Magistrate
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the French Officer
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Du-Ramin (voice)
Surjit Singh ...
Young Newspaper Boy
Lewis Alexander ...
Marine Court of Enquiry Observer (uncredited)
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Gentleman Brown's Henchman (uncredited)
Aileen Lewis ...
Marine Court of Enquiry Observer (uncredited)
Dido Plumb ...
Shomberg's Bar Patron (uncredited)
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The sailor (uncredited)
Nam Siphan ...
The Girl (uncredited)
Suon ...
Ruon (uncredited)
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(uncredited)

Directed by

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Richard Brooks

Written by

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Joseph Conrad ... (novel)
 
Richard Brooks ... (written for the screen by)

Produced by

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Richard Brooks ... producer (uncredited)
Jules Buck ... associate producer (uncredited)
Peter O'Toole ... associate producer (uncredited)

Music by

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Bronislau Kaper

Cinematography by

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Freddie Young ... (as Frederick A. Young)

Film Editing by

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Alan Osbiston

Editorial Department

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Willy Kemplen ... first assistant editor (uncredited)

Production Design by

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Geoffrey Drake

Art Direction by

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Ernest Archer
William Hutchinson ... (as Bill Hutchinson)

Costume Design by

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Phyllis Dalton

Makeup Department

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Gordon Bond ... hairdresser
Charles E. Parker ... chief makeup artist (as Charles Parker)

Production Management

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René Dupont ... production manager
Timothy Burrill ... production manager (uncredited)

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Roy Stevens ... assistant director
Michael Stevenson ... second assistant director
John Sullivan ... second assistant director (uncredited)

Art Department

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Eddie Fowlie ... property master
Chuck Ferrigno ... props (uncredited)
John Graysmark ... assistant art director (uncredited)
Bobby Murrell ... props (uncredited)
Alan Roderick-Jones ... art set assistant (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Paddy Cunningham ... sound recordist
Chris Greenham ... sound editor
Bob Jones ... sound recordist
Richard Best Jr. ... assistant sound editor (uncredited)

Special Effects by

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Cliff Richardson ... special effects
Wally Veevers ... special effects
Fred Heather ... special effects (uncredited)
Garth Inns ... special effects (uncredited)
Curly Nelhams ... special effects (uncredited)

Visual Effects by

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Doug Ferris ... matte artist (uncredited) / matte camera (uncredited)
Peter Melrose ... matte artist (uncredited)

Stunts

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Nosher Powell ... stunts (uncredited)

Camera and Electrical Department

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Ernest Day ... camera operator
Robin Browne ... clapper loader: second unit (uncredited)
Mike Fox ... focus puller: second unit (uncredited)
Maurice Gillett ... supervising electrician (uncredited)
Skeets Kelly ... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
Douglas Kirkland ... still photographer (uncredited)
Bob Stilwell ... clapper loader: second unit (uncredited)
Michael Walter ... key grip (uncredited)
Kenneth J. Withers ... camera operator (uncredited)

Costume and Wardrobe Department

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John Wilson-Apperson ... wardrobe supervisor

Music Department

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Mantle Hood ... musical advisor: oriental music (as Professor Mantle Hood UCLA)
Muir Mathieson ... conductor
Peter Zinner ... music editor
Robert Franklyn ... orchestrator (uncredited)

Other crew

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Arthur Knight ... story editor
Angela Martelli ... continuity
Phou Seang Teng ... stage manager
Cyril Townsend ... stand-in: Peter O'Toole
Dith Pran ... translator (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

James Burke, after distinguishing himself as a midshipman in the British merchant marine, rapidly rises to the rank of executive officer, second in command of a ship. A broken foot necessitates that he be put ashore to heal. After his recovery, the very proud Jim - his pride rooted in his competence, which had made him a highly respected and admired naval officer - signs on as the executive officer of the Patna, a rusty tub manned by a third-rate crew overseen by a barbarous captain, that is transporting a group of Moslem pilgrims to Mecca. During a severe storm that causes the unseaworthy ship to founder, Jim abandons ship with the rest of the white crew without even lowering the other lifeboat for the passengers. The fleeing crew are prepared to swear they saw the Patna sink with all its passengers; however, in what Jim believes is a cosmic joke upon himself, it is revealed when they get into port on their lifeboat that the Patma did not sink but had been salvaged by a French vessel. In the ensuing inquiry that he himself sought to do penance for his sins (the ultimate sin for a naval officer being to abandon ship particularly when passengers or crew are still on-board), Jim is admonished after confessing his cowardice, chastised for bringing shame upon those to whom he belongs, the British merchant marine. His chief judge asks him why he did not "bury himself 20 feet deep" rather than seek the inquiry and humiliate himself and all professional British sailors. Jim does succeed in "burying himself 20 feet deep" by becoming a drifter and common laborer in various southeast Asian ports, though he never can completely escape into anonymity. The burden of his sin follows him everywhere. Racked by guilt over abandoning his ship, the proud Jim seeks atonement, a second chance, which comes in the guise of running arms and gunpowder to a tribe of indigenous peoples oppressed by a ruthless and brutal warlord. The warlord knows that the difference between a hero and a coward is not as thick as a piece of paper. What will this mean for Jim, now committed to a heroic path for a people whom he does not even know? The man the natives soon call "Lord Jim" is about to face his destiny, which is relentless and inescapable. Written by Jon C. Hopwood

Plot Keywords
Taglines Based on the Novel by JOSEPH CONRAD See more »
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Parents Guide Add content advisory for parents »
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Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • O lordos Jim (Greece)
  • Dödens djungel (Sweden)
  • Господарят Джим (Bulgaria, Bulgarian title)
  • Лорд Джим (Soviet Union, Russian title)
  • Lord Džim (Serbia)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 154 min
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Did You Know?

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Trivia In London this film was the Royal Command Film Performance for 1965, with the Queen attending the premiere. James Mason was among the stars presented to Her Majesty, and he was able to secure free tickets for the evening for his parents, who were both octogenarians by this time. However, they disliked the film so much that they discreetly left the theater at the intermission--even though their son had not yet appeared on-screen. See more »
Goofs When Jim is going up river, one of his companions throws a knife into another's back, but the knife is already in his back as he turns to warn Jim. See more »
Movie Connections Featured in My Favorite Year (1982). See more »
Quotes Stein: [to Jim] You have too much pride in your humility.
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