7.8/10
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112 user 81 critic

The Trial (1962)

Le procès (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama, Mystery, Thriller | 22 December 1962 (France)
Trailer
3:55 | Trailer
An unassuming office worker is arrested and stands trial, but he is never made aware of his charges.

Director:

Orson Welles

Writers:

Pierre Cholot (adaptation), Franz Kafka (based on the novel by) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Perkins ... Josef K.
Arnoldo Foà ... Inspector A
Jess Hahn ... Second Assistant Inspector
Billy Kearns Billy Kearns ... First Assistant Inspector (as William Kearns)
Madeleine Robinson ... Mrs. Grubach
Jeanne Moreau ... Marika Burstner
Maurice Teynac Maurice Teynac ... Deputy Manager
Naydra Shore Naydra Shore ... Irmie
Suzanne Flon ... Miss Pittl
Raoul Delfosse Raoul Delfosse ... Policeman
Jean-Claude Rémoleux Jean-Claude Rémoleux ... Policeman
Max Buchsbaum Max Buchsbaum ... Examining Magistrate
Carl Studer Carl Studer ... Man in Leather (as Karl Studer)
Max Haufler Max Haufler ... Uncle Max
Romy Schneider ... Leni
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Storyline

Josef K wakes up in the morning and finds the police in his room. They tell him that he is on trial but nobody tells him what he is accused of. In order to find out about the reason of this accusation and to protest his innocence, he tries to look behind the facade of the judicial system. But since this remains fruitless, there seems to be no chance for him to escape from this Kafkaesque nightmare. Written by Joern Richts <richts@informatik.rwth-aachen.de>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A Film of Enormous Visual Panache! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

It has been reported that Orson Welles dubbed 11 voices in the movie. See more »

Goofs

When Josef K. follows Hilda being carried out of the large trial room/hall by the law student, he hastily grabs and throws on his suit jacket. In the succeeding scenes, the jacket's buttons which are buttoned change. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: Before the law, there stands a guard. A man comes from the country, begging admittance to the law. But the guard cannot admit him. May he hope to enter at a later time? That is possible, said the guard. The man tries to peer through the entrance. He'd been taught that the law was to be accessible to every man. "Do not attempt to enter without my permission", says the guard. I am very powerful. Yet I am the least of all the guards. From hall to hall, door after door, each guard is ...
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Crazy Credits

The end cast credits are read over by Orson Welles without titles (though the actors are read in a different order from their listing on the screen). See more »

Alternate Versions

On the French Studio Canal DVD, there is a deleted scene not found anywhere else. In it, K meets with the scientist in charge of the computer in hopes of using the computer to help his situation. She enters K's information into the computer and it determines the crime he is most likely to commit, suicide. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Lobster (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Adagio Slow
Interprété par Martial Solal, Darryl Hall, Aldo Romano
Arranged By'Jean Ledrut'
Avec l'aimable autorisation de Disques Pathé-Marconi
Publisher: S.l. : Philips, 1962.
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User Reviews

Brilliant Photography
18 December 2002 | by birdland08See all my reviews

Despite the fact that Welles is best remembered for the film ranked first by the AFI among the films of the Twentieth Century, Citizen Kane, Welles considered The Trial his finest work. In my mind, it is the most beautifully photographed film ever made in black and white, and its sense of composition is that of an artist. The settings are dark and mysterious, and a sense that humanity has been shunted to the margins of a dark industrial order is beautifully conveyed.

I'm told that younger people who did not grow up with black and white TV or with black and white movies automatically tune out pieces that are not in color. That is a shame, as there are films that are better made in black and white, and expressions of time and mood that cannot be made as well in color. Welles never really got the chance to make the transition to color that Kubrick made as well as any American director. Perhaps he would have found expressive use of color as well as Kubrick did, but certainly neither this film nor Citizen Kane could be made in color.

The brilliance of its artistry aside, the film will not appeal to everyone because of the deliberate opaqueness of the plot, and because of its lack of optimism. I like Kafka's story, and I like the movie very well, but it is more art than diversionary entertainment, and some might prefer a good action flick or a romantic comedy.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

France | Italy | West Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 December 1962 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Trial See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Optiphone) (source format)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

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