7.8/10
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112 user 81 critic

The Trial (1962)

Le procès (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama, Mystery, Thriller | 22 December 1962 (France)
Trailer
3:55 | Trailer
An unassuming office worker is arrested and stands trial, but he is never made aware of his charges.

Director:

Orson Welles

Writers:

Pierre Cholot (adaptation), Franz Kafka (based on the novel by) | 1 more credit »
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1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Perkins ... Josef K.
Arnoldo Foà ... Inspector A
Jess Hahn ... Second Assistant Inspector
Billy Kearns Billy Kearns ... First Assistant Inspector (as William Kearns)
Madeleine Robinson ... Mrs. Grubach
Jeanne Moreau ... Marika Burstner
Maurice Teynac Maurice Teynac ... Deputy Manager
Naydra Shore Naydra Shore ... Irmie
Suzanne Flon ... Miss Pittl
Raoul Delfosse Raoul Delfosse ... Policeman
Jean-Claude Rémoleux Jean-Claude Rémoleux ... Policeman
Max Buchsbaum Max Buchsbaum ... Examining Magistrate
Carl Studer Carl Studer ... Man in Leather (as Karl Studer)
Max Haufler Max Haufler ... Uncle Max
Romy Schneider ... Leni
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Storyline

Josef K wakes up in the morning and finds the police in his room. They tell him that he is on trial but nobody tells him what he is accused of. In order to find out about the reason of this accusation and to protest his innocence, he tries to look behind the facade of the judicial system. But since this remains fruitless, there seems to be no chance for him to escape from this Kafkaesque nightmare. Written by Joern Richts <richts@informatik.rwth-aachen.de>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Most Remarkable Motion Picture Ever Made! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In May '62, while filming, Jeanne Moreau suffered a slight nervous breakdown due to the stifling atmosphere of the film. See more »

Goofs

When Josef K. follows Hilda being carried out of the large trial room/hall by the law student, he hastily grabs and throws on his suit jacket. In the succeeding scenes, the jacket's buttons which are buttoned change. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: Before the law, there stands a guard. A man comes from the country, begging admittance to the law. But the guard cannot admit him. May he hope to enter at a later time? That is possible, said the guard. The man tries to peer through the entrance. He'd been taught that the law was to be accessible to every man. "Do not attempt to enter without my permission", says the guard. I am very powerful. Yet I am the least of all the guards. From hall to hall, door after door, each guard is ...
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Crazy Credits

The end cast credits are read over by Orson Welles without titles (though the actors are read in a different order from their listing on the screen). See more »

Alternate Versions

In 1984, the Desilu studios acquired The Trial and re-edited it prior to its release on American TV. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Judas: Respect (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Sentimental Slow
Composed by Jean Ledrut
Interprété par Martial Solal, Darryl Hall, Aldo Romano
Avec l'aimable autorisation de Disques Pathé-Marconi
Publisher: S.l. : Philips, 1962.
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User Reviews

 
Overwhelmingly Confusing, But Magnificently Composed
23 August 2011 | by drqshadow-reviewsSee all my reviews

I found a lot to adore in "The Trial," but just as much to furrow my brow over. The cinematography is stunning; full of visual metaphor and gorgeous composition, it's an unyielding show of movie-making expertise. Welles plays up the bleak, "no tomorrow" nature of the exterior scenes, the structured chaos of the workplace and the hedonistic excess exhibited by the various stages of the trial itself, each to great effect. The story, though, feels too flighty and nebulous for my taste. It should come as no surprise, being a translation of a Kafka novel, that the entire picture often feels surreal and confusing. It continuously floats and sputters just beyond the grasp of understanding, like a moth delicately avoiding a set of flailing hands. The premise may have been established nicely during the slightly more straightforward opening scenes, but as the duration grows it becomes too ambitiously ambiguous for its own good.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

France | Italy | West Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 December 1962 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Trial See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Optiphone) (source format)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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